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Discussion Starter #1
Jeff mentioned that Optima didn't give a warranty on Optimas in EV use.
Shame on them

With golf cart batteries, Sam's swapped me a new one when one vented under
my butt within the 30 day warranty period. They also refunded me when I
bought Stowaway marine batteries in the early 90's that didn't meet AH range
specs (which I replaced with golf cart batteries). Presently I'm using
surplus ni-cads but when they die I'll probably go back to golf cart
batteries since the STM5-180 isn't made anymore. Just looking at the best
cost per mile when driving 370 miles per week.

Have a renewable energy day,
Mark

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Discussion Starter #2
Nickel IRON batteries, a battery alternative to lead. Anyone ever try them
out for 10 years and see if it actually works ?

Well if you are rich and can carry additional battery weight of say 110lbs
for a 12V battery that produces 122Ah and comes with a warranty for 10
years. Plus, the battery can last 50 years, which would make you an old
person unless taking telomerase activators (immortality drug). Well to read
more about Nickel Iron batteries , see
http://www.beutilityfree.com/batterynife/Flyer.pdf . www.beutilityfree.com
Of course they are made in CHINA (most likely) as companies in US are too
STINGY to make them. Heard from hearsay that these batteries don't produce
as much overall amperage, but I don't know about this. Also, heard that you
supposed to connect a gravity feeder to all the batteries, so the fluid
level stays optimal without you having to worry about the level yourself.
Also, heard REVA has this gravity system in their Indian EV cars.

Here is probably what most would need. 183Ah 12V Cost $966 each 12V pack.
Weight 230lbs per battery. You would need 7 of these and that would weigh
1610lbs and cost $6762. Now you'd have to pick them up at port or pay more
to freight them.

Supposedly, if the alkaline electrolyte is completely changed every few
years the batteries will last 80 years.



Mark Hanson-2 wrote:
>
> Jeff mentioned that Optima didn't give a warranty on Optimas in EV use.
> Shame on them
>
> With golf cart batteries, Sam's swapped me a new one when one vented
> under
> my butt within the 30 day warranty period. They also refunded me when I
> bought Stowaway marine batteries in the early 90's that didn't meet AH
> range
> specs (which I replaced with golf cart batteries). Presently I'm using
> surplus ni-cads but when they die I'll probably go back to golf cart
> batteries since the STM5-180 isn't made anymore. Just looking at the best
> cost per mile when driving 370 miles per week.
>
> Have a renewable energy day,
> Mark
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Can you find the hidden words? Take a break and play Seekadoo!
> http://club.live.com/seekadoo.aspx?icid=seek_hotmailtextlink1
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>

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View this message in context: http://www.nabble.com/No-Warranties-on-Optimas-tf4392917s25542.html#a13258408
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Discussion Starter #3
NiFe's are wonderful. At a railway museum I've touched them, used them,
cycled them - damn things still work after all these years.

They don't freeze, because their electrolyte doesn't change chemically.
That also means capacity isn't limited by electrolyte strength or quantity.

They would be insanely great for home power. Railroads used them to
power block signals that were too far from wired power, often in
desolate locations that suffered extreme conditions. Signal maintainers
would charge up NiFe's in the shop and haul them to the remote site in a
track speeder once a week.

Now that railroads have gone PV solar, NiFe's seem to only be used in
stationary power situations. These current Chinese NiFe's are MUCH
larger and heavier than old railroad signal batteries, where a 10-cell
pack (12V) could be easily lifted by a human.

Edison intended them for EV batteries, which sounds great to me. But
then, Edison's EVs weren't expected to go 0-60 in 10 seconds.

Robert


ampaynz1 wrote:
> Nickel IRON batteries, a battery alternative to lead. Anyone ever try them
> out for 10 years and see if it actually works ?
>
> Well if you are rich and can carry additional battery weight of say 110lbs
> for a 12V battery that produces 122Ah and comes with a warranty for 10
> years. Plus, the battery can last 50 years, which would make you an old
> person unless taking telomerase activators (immortality drug). Well to read
> more about Nickel Iron batteries , see
> http://www.beutilityfree.com/batterynife/Flyer.pdf . www.beutilityfree.com
> Of course they are made in CHINA (most likely) as companies in US are too
> STINGY to make them. Heard from hearsay that these batteries don't produce
> as much overall amperage, but I don't know about this. Also, heard that you
> supposed to connect a gravity feeder to all the batteries, so the fluid
> level stays optimal without you having to worry about the level yourself.
> Also, heard REVA has this gravity system in their Indian EV cars.
>
> Here is probably what most would need. 183Ah 12V Cost $966 each 12V pack.
> Weight 230lbs per battery. You would need 7 of these and that would weigh
> 1610lbs and cost $6762. Now you'd have to pick them up at port or pay more
> to freight them.
>
> Supposedly, if the alkaline electrolyte is completely changed every few
> years the batteries will last 80 years.
>
>
>
> Mark Hanson-2 wrote:
>> Jeff mentioned that Optima didn't give a warranty on Optimas in EV use.
>> Shame on them
>>
>> With golf cart batteries, Sam's swapped me a new one when one vented
>> under
>> my butt within the 30 day warranty period. They also refunded me when I
>> bought Stowaway marine batteries in the early 90's that didn't meet AH
>> range
>> specs (which I replaced with golf cart batteries). Presently I'm using
>> surplus ni-cads but when they die I'll probably go back to golf cart
>> batteries since the STM5-180 isn't made anymore. Just looking at the best
>> cost per mile when driving 370 miles per week.
>>
>> Have a renewable energy day,
>> Mark
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________
>> Can you find the hidden words? Take a break and play Seekadoo!
>> http://club.live.com/seekadoo.aspx?icid=seek_hotmailtextlink1
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> For subscription options, see
>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>
>

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