DIY Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
They were out of the link10 when I needed one at the local boat store so
I got a link 1000. Is the link10 the same way in being designed for a
24V power source?
When I had it connected to my bottom most battery(I know, no isolation.
I put it there before I had a dc-dc ) it would brown out and reset all
the time. I connected it to the bottom two batteries and no more
problems. I am just wondering if a 12 isolated dc-dc is the right
choice. Maybe using a 18V or 24V would be more stable.

_______________________________________________
For subscription options, see
http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
If the "it" you cite is the Link 10, you are correct
that most of us are running it from a dedicated
bipolar 12V power supply. I'm using one by Belktronix
that just hooks up to the most pos./neg. leads of the
battery pack. It is rock solid.
I was using the bipolar supply coming from the DCP
DCDC converter, but am still wondering if it was
responsible for some erratic readings.

--- Jeff Shanab <[email protected]> wrote:

> They were out of the link10 when I needed one at the
> local boat store so
> I got a link 1000. Is the link10 the same way in
> being designed for a
> 24V power source?
> When I had it connected to my bottom most battery(I
> know, no isolation.
> I put it there before I had a dc-dc ) it would brown
> out and reset all
> the time. I connected it to the bottom two batteries
> and no more
> problems. I am just wondering if a 12 isolated dc-dc
> is the right
> choice. Maybe using a 18V or 24V would be more
> stable.
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>


Converting a gen. 5 Honda Civic? My $20 "CiviWithACord" DVD shows footage of my '92 sedan, as well as a del Sol and hatch too!
www.budget.net/~bbath/CivicWithACord.html
____
__/__|__\ __
=D-------/ - - \
'O'-----'O'-'
Would you still drive your car if the tailpipe came out of the steering wheel? Are you saving any gas for your kids?

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

_______________________________________________
For subscription options, see
http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Jeff Shanab wrote:
> They were out of the Link-10 when I needed one at the local boat
> store, so I got a link-1000. Is the Link-10 the same way in being
> designed for a 24V power source?

The E-meter, Link-10, Link-20, and Link-1000 are all the same basic
design. They just added extra bells and whistles to monitor a second
battery (Link-20) or control an inverter or generator (Link-1000). To
fit in the extra features, they left out some of the EV-specific E-meter
/ Link-10 features like prescaler and serial port.

> When I had it connected to my bottom-most battery (I know, no
> isolation; I put it there before I had a DC/DC) it would brown out
> and reset all the time. I connected it to the bottom two batteries
> and no more problems. I am just wondering if a 12v isolated DC/DC is
> the right choice. Maybe using a 18V or 24V would be more stable.

The E-meter wasn't designed for electric vehicles. It was intended for
boats, RVs, and alternative energy systems that don't load their
batteries below 1.75v/cell (i.e. 10.5v per 12v battery). So, their
internal power supply only works down to about 10v.

In an EV, if you try to power the E-meter from a 12v tap on the
propulsion pack, it is easy to draw a high enough current so that tap
goes below 10v.

But the internal power supply works up to 40v max -- so you can power
the E-meter from a 24v tap instead. If you ever sag a 24v tap to 10v,
you are *really* murdering your batteries! And even during the worst
equalizing charge imaginable (say, 2.7v/cell) the 24v tap won't go over 32v.

Don't try to use a 36v tap -- it will go over 40v the first time you
charge, and kill the E-meter from over-voltage.

I used a 24v DC/DC in my E-meter / Link-10 Companion board. First,
because the E-meter's internal power supply is more efficient at 24v.
Second, so it can survive a much longer brown-out (power sag). There is
a big 1000uF capacitor in the E-meter that keeps it working for several
seconds at 24v; but less than 1 second at 12v.
--
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget the perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net

_______________________________________________
For subscription options, see
http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top