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Discussion Starter #1
Dear All,

If you wanted to combine the output of 2 electric motors to have the output
available on one shaft, could you use a differential in reverse, as it were?
IE connect each motor directly to what should be the left and right
half-shaft and then the output would be available on what would normally be
the input shaft. Then you could connect the one lump (motor
pair/differential) output to the input shaft of your donor vehicle to
complete the drive train (or put it through a gearbox etc).

The advantages would be;-
a/ you could use relatively inexpensive AC motor/controller combos like ebay
#250162167453 to achieve quite good peak power (80HP in this case) instead
of much more expensive alternatives and
b/ that instead of having each motor connected to a wheel - as I gather
multi-motor conversions are done usually - you can leave all the potentially
difficult to modify drive train, suspension etc as it is. It would also
allow the use of a gearbox - even the full unadulterated donor vehicle drive
train (g/box, prop shaft, differential, half-shafts/rear axle) without mods.

I don't know if they are designed to be run in reverse though.

Regards, Martin.
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Registered
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70 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
martin winlow wrote:
>> If you wanted to combine the output of 2 electric motors to have
>> the output available on one shaft, could you use a differential in
>> reverse, as it were? IE connect each motor directly to what should
>> be the left and right half-shaft and then the output would be
>> available on what would normally be the input shaft?

Zeke Yewdall wrote:
> The issue that I see is that your motor speed ends of being exactly
> the same as your wheel speed (if the two differentials were the same
> ratio -- first one steps up the speed, then second one steps it back
> down), so you'd need a high torque low rpm motor.

The VW Eurovan 4-wheel-drive version has a rather unique rear
differential that might work well for this. It is a fully independent
rear suspension (half shafts with universal joints to each rear wheel),
plus it has a 1:1 ratio (the drive shaft spins at the same speed as the
rear axles). I think they did this so they could keep the same front
transaxle used in the normal front-wheel-drive-only Eurovans. A viscous
fluid coupling connects the rear drive shaft to the transaxle.

--
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget the perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net

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