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Discussion Starter #1
I've come by a 5 HP Baylor 208/240 electric motor. Give me some
suggestions to entertain as to what all I can do with this motor!
What controller would be suitable to use with it as well.

Thanks in advance!

Ralph.

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Victory belongs to the most persevering.
--Napoleon Bonaparte--

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Discussion Starter #2
I don't know if you can use it to propel a vehicle since it's fixed RPM, but
I believe you could couple it to an engine and make a pretty nice portable
generator/charger out of it.


----- Original Message -----
From: "R Patterson" <[email protected]>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Tuesday, October 23, 2007 5:13 PM
Subject: [EVDL] What to do with a 5HP Baylor motor?


> I've come by a 5 HP Baylor 208/240 electric motor. Give me some
> suggestions to entertain as to what all I can do with this motor!
> What controller would be suitable to use with it as well.
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> Ralph.
>
> --
> Victory belongs to the most persevering.
> --Napoleon Bonaparte--
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
>


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Discussion Starter #3
Oh yeah, and be careful of the 11th commandment everybody, Though shalt not
covet another mans junk :).

----- Original Message -----
From: "R Patterson" <[email protected]>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Tuesday, October 23, 2007 5:13 PM
Subject: [EVDL] What to do with a 5HP Baylor motor?


> I've come by a 5 HP Baylor 208/240 electric motor. Give me some
> suggestions to entertain as to what all I can do with this motor!
> What controller would be suitable to use with it as well.
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> Ralph.
>
> --
> Victory belongs to the most persevering.
> --Napoleon Bonaparte--
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
>


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Discussion Starter #5
----- Original Message -----
From: "R Patterson" <[email protected]>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Tuesday, October 23, 2007 6:13 PM
Subject: [EVDL] What to do with a 5HP Baylor motor?


> I've come by a 5 HP Baylor 208/240 electric motor. Give me some
> suggestions to entertain as to what all I can do with this motor!
> What controller would be suitable to use with it as well.
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> Ralph.

Hi Ralph;
> Sounds like an AC motor, BIG clunky thing? Maybe us it for tradin'
> material, at a junk yard for a DC motor, like out of a forklist or
> Electric Truck? Just about all of us are using series DC motors, in the 6
> to 9 inch diameter.They can SOMEtimes be had in Junkyards.

Happy hunting!

Bob ..... BAYLOR motor? Out of a bilge pump? Sorry, couldn't resist!Almost
as exhotic as a CAV motor!
> --
> Victory belongs to the most persevering.

Napoleon Bonaparte---

"There is no greater joy nor reward than to make a fundamental difference
in someone's life"

Sister Mary Rose McGready

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Discussion Starter #11
Convert your lawnmower? riding lawnmower, that is.

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Discussion Starter #12
R Patterson wrote:
> Is there someway to convert this beast into a variable speed motor...
> and maybe pump some more HP out of it with cooling?

There's nothing about the motor itself that makes it run at one speed.
The speed is determined by the frequency of the AC powering it. If this
AC comes from the AC power line, then all you get is one frequency (60
Hz), so one speed (1750 RPM for a 4-pole motor).

But, if this AC comes from an inverter whose frequency (and voltage) can
be adjusted, then you have a variable-speed motor. This is what is
always done for AC-driven EVs. For example, they will start with a motor
having a "nameplate" rating of

120/208 VAC, 60 Hz, 5 HP continuous

And drive it with an inverter that produces AC from

10-300 VAC, 10-120 Hz, 50 HP peak for 5 minutes

They get the higher HP by running the motor at higher frequency, higher
voltage, improving the cooling, and only running it at high HP for short
periods of time.

They normally use 3-phase motors. This is roughly equivalent to a
6-cylinder engine; they run a lot smoother and quieter, and are more
efficient. The one you have might be single-phase; like a 1-cylinder
engine, you get a lot more noise and vibration, and it won't be as
efficient (but it's cheaper).

--
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget the perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net

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Discussion Starter #16
From: Marty Hewes
> if you run a motor designed to run at 60Hz AC at less than 60Hz AC
> at the same voltage, aren't you going to have saturation problems
> in the metal of the armature?

You are correct. The voltage and frequency are normally varied together to avoid exactly this problem. For example, if the motor is rated at 120vac 60hz, then you can also run it at 100vac 50hz, or 240vac 120hz, etc.

As you get more sophisticated, the inverter will independently control voltage and frequency. For example, it might apply only 60vac at 60hz if the load only requires half the torque at this speed.

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"Excellence does not require perfection." -- Henry James
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Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart-at-earthlink.net

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Discussion Starter #17
I will add that almost all induction motors that start under a load, at
least start on three phase.

Something has to set up a direction of rotation. They shade one side of
the pole to get things spinning on single phase blower motors,fans,
blenders and such. If, however you look at the motor on your table saw
or air compressor, you will see the starting capacitor. This creates a
temporary third phase to help get over the initial starting load. Some
leave the cap in the circuit, usually a larger starting winding and a
second cap to balance it out, but the simplest are only in there during
start and use a centripetal switch to disconnect it once it exceeds
pullout rpm(about 90% of free rpm)

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Discussion Starter #18
Jeff Shanab wrote:
> I will add that almost all induction motors that start under a load, at
> least start on three phase.

Two phase, actually.

--
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget the perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net

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Discussion Starter #19
R Patterson wrote:
> This is a 3 phase 5HP Baylor, 208-230/460 volts, 15-13.2/6.6 amps,
> 1725 RPM. So is this thing worthy of a small car project? ... and if
> so how would I determine it's peak rating?

That might be big enough to be useful. I assume it's not an "inverter
grade" motor, so it will have a bit weaker insulation and a bit lower
efficiency. But that in itself is not a serious problem -- it just
limits the peak rating.

The peak rating itself is something you'll have to determine by
comparison with the specs of similar motors, or by trial and error.
Basically, the harder you drive it, the hotter it gets. At some point it
gets hot enough to fail. But you can put temperature sensors on it for a
warning before it actually fails.

I'd say it's a safe bet that it's good for at least 10 HP continuous at
120 Hz, and perhaps double that for 5-10 minutes at a time.
--
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget the perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net

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