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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here’s a place for everything EV Controls T2C. I recently installed one in my project and had a few small issues during the install. This morning EV Controls dropped a new, more robust, manual. It addresses most, if not all of the issues I ran into. After a few missteps in MCU land I’m very happy to have found this solution. The proprietor of the company is helpful but obviously very busy. The expectation of EV Controls fits the nature of this board, meaning do your homework and be prepared before asking questions you could answer yourself. Hopefully this thread can lighten the load and I wouldn’t be surprised if the proprietor doesn’t see suggestions here and incorporate them in future manual updates.

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I’ll go first. If during the initial “Flashing” process you find things aren’t progressing, cycle the key switch. I had left the key on over night before trying to flash and figured it was cool just to roll into the process but it appeared to cause an issue. Midway through the 3 separate flashes I had to do, while emailing EV controls back and forth in a process that took about an hour of sending emails, I cycled the key switch once again when it seemed like things weren’t progressing properly. Once cycling the key switch the flash progressed immediately. Just a suggestion if your flash seems to be stuck..
 

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My only wish is that there was a solution for flipping D and R on the app. Tesla motors in Land Rovers call for running the motor in reverse. Internally the oil pump is switched to pump in reverse. EV controls says the app can’t accommodate the switch and that some owners have reworked the encoder and reversed the phase leads. I’d love to know more. Too bad there isn’t a software solution…
 

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Flipping two phase leads is easy. Encoder needs a bit of homework but shouldn't be horrible.

I found this interesting:

"Traction control

We are releasing traction control features for the T2C in early 2022. Our traction control system uses a high resolution GNSS module we developed, along with our software, to modulate torque under acceleration and regen conditions and maintain drive wheel traction at the limit of what is available.
To use the traction control features, you need to install the EV-controls GNSS module and connect it to the CAN bus (CAN 1), 12v power and ground. The T2C software monitors data coming from the module, and when a valid signal is available, traction control will be enabled. You can monitor the status of the traction control in the dash app. An icon at the top of the left power gauge will either display "no TC", "TC on", or "TC active" when the system is limiting torque for longer periods.

You can monitor the satellites available to the GNSS module, and the difference in speed between the driven wheels and actual vehicle speed (kph) in the center information scroll view. These values are near the bottom, so scroll down to see them. You can also use the logging features to monitor these parameters.

You must adjust the "front wheel speed scalar" value under the T2C settings so that the "TC slip measured" parameter is as close as possible to zero while driving straight at low power. The value is high resolution and measures in hundredths of a kph, so it is normal for it to vary slightly above and below zero under these conditions. You can also disable/enable the traction control by using the TC icon in the bottom right of the screen. This can be useful to satisfy juvenile tendencies that may present themselves, and perform emergency maneuvers (ie. burnouts and doughnuts).

Traction control will never be enabled unless a valid GPS signal is available, so you can disable traction control entirely by simply switching off the GNSS module."



So "traction control" is a vehicle slip measurement that temporarily remaps the torque curve of the traction motor. This is different than a limited slip diff which tries to ensure both sides of the diff are fully engaged to the road surface.

So, I'll partially backpedal my mockery of them allegedly using a GPS in that they are peddling apples and we (@dlud, @57Chevy, @bobwind, @brian_ , et al) were buying oranges in @428RC's 1962 Corvette thread.
 

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Yea, I thought that approach was 'interesting' definitely no replacement for a real LSD

functionally, there is always a slight lag between actual road speed and a gps speed reading, its not and will never be instantaneous.
So, in that moment when you do need traction control, it only kicks in half a second or more 'after' your already power sliding into a wet corner. It obviously also depends on having a good signal (4 or more sats) so there will be times in big cities it may not work properly and good luck in tunnels and potentially really bad weather, ironically the exact time you'd want the traction control working perfectly.

Seems like they've gotten themselves stuck into developing a system around the module. Having an option to connect to wheel speed sensors in the breakout sub box would be functionally better for a larger range of customers, In theory it only needs a pair of wheel sensors on the other axle as the motor has a speed sensor internally and fixed gearing to the wheels, that really couldn't be too hard to implement?

Similar to if the app was available on Android as well instead of just Apple seems like the same thing, they've set themselves on one thing and no other option will ever be considered.
 
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