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I have a large compound dc motor and ev1 controller. It was working til recently it stopped working. I've been tracking wires and swapping them with new copper wires(was all aluminum). I'm stumped any help would be appreciated. The ev1 was working would like to get it going again. But if there is a simpler opetion for a controller with reverse that could be an option. Can I run a curtis sepex controller with the compound dc motor? I reached out GE and all they could tell me was normal voltage, kw, class and roughly the motor is from the early 80s.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What leads you to believe it is a compound wound motor?
Regards,
major
I'm sorry, I looked up the email again to double check my response, and the engineer said it's a series wound motor. But my question is why does it have four motor terminals? I though 4 motor terminals means compound dc or shunt motor. It does run is forward and reverse directions with the switch board.
 

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What leads you to believe it is a compound wound motor?
Regards,
major
I've attached the info I received from GE power solutions. Could you guide me in the right direction for a new controller that will work. I want to keep the 36v system. I guess I forgot they told me it was a compound motor. Why would a series motor have four input terminals?
 

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That spec sheet claims it is a series wound motor. Series wound reversible motors require 4 terminals, 2 for armature, A1 & A2, and two for the series field, S1 & S2. To reverse rotation direction on the series motor, either the armature, or the field, must have polarity reversed, but not both. Such circuitry requires separate armature and field termination.

major
 

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That spec sheet claims it is a series wound motor. Series wound reversible motors require 4 terminals, 2 for armature, A1 & A2, and two for the series field, S1 & S2. To reverse rotation direction on the series motor, either the armature, or the field, must have polarity reversed, but not both. Such circuitry requires separate armature and field termination.

major
If I don't use the ev1 scr I have, can I use any series wound motor controller with matching voltage and amperage? Do you have any suggestions on a new motor controller?
 

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can I use any series wound motor controller with matching voltage and amperage?
Series motors are particularly agnostic about where their juice comes from. Voltage is voltage.

Anything that varies the voltage will work as a speed controller.

Golf cart controllers were popular, but there are many series-wound speed controllers out there, including some you build for yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
can I use any series wound motor controller with matching voltage and amperage?
Series motors are particularly agnostic about where their juice comes from. Voltage is voltage.

Anything that varies the voltage will work as a speed controller.

Golf cart controllers were popular, but there are many series-wound speed controllers out there, including some you build for yourself.
Sorry for the dumb question but would a series/pm motor controller work? I'm looking at a kelly controller. The controller is the Kelly KDZ Series/PM Motor Controller 24-48v 300amp with Regen. Also how would I get reverse with a new controller, do I need another switch board like the ev1 uses or does the Kelly controller have that built in. Thank you all for your answers to my questions.
 

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Sorry for the dumb question but would a series/pm motor controller work? I'm looking at a kelly controller. The controller is the Kelly KDZ Series/PM Motor Controller 24-48v 300amp with Regen.
Presumably yes, but regen probably won't. Regen on a series motor is all but impossible, I've heard of maybe 1 or 2 people ever who implemented it on their builds.

It depends on what's inside the Kelly controller, you'll have to read the specs and/or the manual.

Also how would I get reverse with a new controller, do I need another switch board like the ev1 uses or does the Kelly controller have that built in.
Again, you'll have to read the manual.

Reversing a series motor requires flipping the field and armature relative to each other (flip one or the other, not both). Often that's done with a physical contactor, but the controller can do it too.

Alternatively you can use the transmission and mechanically reverse. I'm not sure what your vehicle has in it.
 

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Regen on a series motor is all but impossible, I've heard of maybe 1 or 2 people ever who implemented it on their builds.

It depends on what's inside the Kelly controller, you'll have to read the specs and/or the manual.
I was surprised to see that the Kelly KDZ series includes a regen option... but only for permanent magnet motors.

Reversing a series motor requires flipping the field and armature relative to each other (flip one or the other, not both). Often that's done with a physical contactor, but the controller can do it too.
For a controller to handle reversing a series motor, it would need to have separate field and armature output terminals. The KDZ has only three terminals (battery negative, motor negative, and common positive) so it can't possibly handle reversing. The manual includes wiring diagrams showing how an external contactor can be used to provide reverse.

Even though it doesn't do the reversing itself, the controller is designed to apply different limits to reverse operation, based on an input from a reverse switch, as shown in the wiring diagram.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sorry for the dumb question but would a series/pm motor controller work? I'm looking at a kelly controller. The controller is the Kelly KDZ Series/PM Motor Controller 24-48v 300amp with Regen.
Presumably yes, but regen probably won't. Regen on a series motor is all but impossible, I've heard of maybe 1 or 2 people ever who implemented it on their builds.

It depends on what's inside the Kelly controller, you'll have to read the specs and/or the manual.

Also how would I get reverse with a new controller, do I need another switch board like the ev1 uses or does the Kelly controller have that built in.
Again, you'll have to read the manual.

Reversing a series motor requires flipping the field and armature relative to each other (flip one or the other, not both). Often that's done with a physical contactor, but the controller can do it too.

Alternatively you can use the transmission and mechanically reverse. I'm not sure what your vehicle has in it.
my vehicle doesn't have a transmission, because I was relying on the motor to run backwards. Thanks for the info I'll look into it. The motor I'm using is the GE equivalent to the warp 11. Just made for 36v instead of 72v.
 

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Regen on a series motor is all but impossible, I've heard of maybe 1 or 2 people ever who implemented it on their builds.

It depends on what's inside the Kelly controller, you'll have to read the specs and/or the manual.
I was surprised to see that the Kelly KDZ series includes a regen option... but only for permanent magnet motors.

Reversing a series motor requires flipping the field and armature relative to each other (flip one or the other, not both). Often that's done with a physical contactor, but the controller can do it too.
For a controller to handle reversing a series motor, it would need to have separate field and armature output terminals. The KDZ has only three terminals (battery negative, motor negative, and common positive) so it can't possibly handle reversing. The manual includes wiring diagrams showing how an external contactor can be used to provide reverse.

Even though it doesn't do the reversing itself, the controller is designed to apply different limits to reverse operation, based on an input from a reverse switch, as shown in the wiring diagram.
Based on what your saying would a sepex controller run this series motor, since is has four inputs? Or is it best to just find a series motor controller and run a contractor or manual switch for forward/N/reverse.
 

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About the voltage!

If you run a low voltage the motor will produce it's usual Torque BUT as the revs rise it will rapidly drop off to zero

I have a Hitachi 11 inch motor - it's great - but when I was only using 130 volt it limited my top speed to 100 kph

With 36 volt you may not be able to reach 30 mph
 

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About the voltage!

If you run a low voltage the motor will produce it's usual Torque BUT as the revs rise it will rapidly drop off to zero

I have a Hitachi 11 inch motor - it's great - but when I was only using 130 volt it limited my top speed to 100 kph

With 36 volt you may not be able to reach 30 mph
If my top speed is 30mph that would be perfect I really only need 15mph.
 
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