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In the spirit of having fun with a vehicle, having the ability to pop the clutch to break the tires loose is a much more controllable way of getting the tail out! Depending on setup there would still be a fair bit of inertia to a motor that would make this possible. Given the choice between a single speed EV or a 2-3 speed with a clutch I would absolutely chose the latter for that additional fun factor!
I suppose, but in a low enough gear (even a single-speed, depending on motor) the tires will spin - in a much more controllable way - by just applying more accelerator pedal.
 

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In the spirit of having fun with a vehicle, having the ability to pop the clutch to break the tires loose is a much more controllable way of getting the tail out! Depending on setup there would still be a fair bit of inertia to a motor that would make this possible. Given the choice between a single speed EV or a 2-3 speed with a clutch I would absolutely chose the latter for that additional fun factor!
I have a single speed - no clutch - and I can pop the rear tyres loose just by pressing the loud pedal

A modern EV will have software to PREVENT this - but my DC forklift motor and basic controller is too primitive
 

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Here is an answer I gave on another forum, cause a lot of people are asking just that :)


We kept the manual transmission for three reasons:

1. The width of the torque band in a typical AC motor is worth about three gears in an ICE. So, you can definitely get away with just one gear. But it's a compromise--even for Tesla, which has a "low" top speed for how much power it has. We want to be able to hit 200mph with this car and you couldn't do that with a single speed without giving up too much acceleration. Two gears is about perfect for an EV, but there aren't any decent 2 speed gearboxes on the market and they'd be hard to develop.

2. A lot of people enjoy going through the gears. An electric is already a pretty out there concept for the typical Mustang fan, and having gears helps with that. I just got back from SEMA, where the car was revealed, and I got that feedback a LOT.

3. Coming up with a single gear reduction is actually a lot harder than using an existing 6 speed. The differential by itself is not enough reduction, so you need something more. And the existing offerings, such as the Borg Warner eGearDrive, can't handle 1000 ft-lbs of torque.

I will add that, although it has six speeds, you'll never use them all. First is completely unusable. Second is good for converting tires to smoke. Third fourth and fifth are all a lot of fun. I don't know for certain yet, but I doubt sixth will ever be used...I think you would run out of power before you ran out of RPM in 5th. Like I said, if there were a good 2 speed we'd use it.

Great job on the Mustang conversion!

I get the same questions when I take my converted Mustang to car shows, and there were a lot of these types of comments/questions when it won the Ford Canada #sweeteststang contest. Mine has a 5-speed T5 transmission, upgraded to handle the torque. I spend time walking through the same technical reasons for the transmission as you did above, but some people just like the "cool" factor of being able to shift gears. I think much of this is just nostalgia for old manual shift cars, but even my 20 year old son thinks that manual transmissions in sports cars are cool.
 

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It seems to me that the mustang should not be electric, but in terms of technical characteristics it is very powerful.
 

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Here is an answer I gave on another forum, cause a lot of people are asking just that :)


We kept the manual transmission for three reasons:

1. The width of the torque band in a typical AC motor is worth about three gears in an ICE. So, you can definitely get away with just one gear. But it's a compromise--even for Tesla, which has a "low" top speed for how much power it has. We want to be able to hit 200mph with this car and you couldn't do that with a single speed without giving up too much acceleration. Two gears is about perfect for an EV, but there aren't any decent 2 speed gearboxes on the market and they'd be hard to develop.

2. A lot of people enjoy going through the gears. An electric is already a pretty out there concept for the typical Mustang fan, and having gears helps with that. I just got back from SEMA, where the car was revealed, and I got that feedback a LOT.

3. Coming up with a single gear reduction is actually a lot harder than using an existing 6 speed. The differential by itself is not enough reduction, so you need something more. And the existing offerings, such as the Borg Warner eGearDrive, can't handle 1000 ft-lbs of torque.






I will add that, although it has six speeds, you'll never use them all. First is completely unusable. Second is good for converting tires to smoke. Third fourth and fifth are all a lot of fun. I don't know for certain yet, but I doubt sixth will ever be used...I think you would run out of power before you ran out of RPM in 5th. Like I said, if there were a good 2 speed we'd use it.
Hi Hollie!

I'm new to this forum and I came upon this thread to see if anybody here was talking about the Mustang Lithium. I was thinking though, although you mention there aren't any good two speeds on the market, wouldn't a Powerglide or TH400 work fine? They're still used in drag cars today and can handle ludicrous amounts of power. Although they're automatic, many companies make full manual versions.
 

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I'm new to this forum and I came upon this thread to see if anybody here was talking about the Mustang Lithium. I was thinking though, although you mention there aren't any good two speeds on the market, wouldn't a Powerglide or TH400 work fine? They're still used in drag cars today and can handle ludicrous amounts of power. Although they're automatic, many companies make full manual versions.
Those old automatics can be converted to be used without a torque converter, but they are unnecessarily heavy, complex, and expensive.

As I mentioned earlier, there are two-speed transmissions suitable for EVs available... just not ones really suitable for a converted Mustang like this. Volvo has introduced battery-electric trucks in various sizes (including some sold by their Mack division, and the powertrain for the Rosenbauer electric fire truck), and all use a two-speed transmission developed and built by Volvo.
 

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I will add that, although it has six speeds, you'll never use them all. First is completely unusable. Second is good for converting tires to smoke. Third fourth and fifth are all a lot of fun. I don't know for certain yet, but I doubt sixth will ever be used...I think you would run out of power before you ran out of RPM in 5th. Like I said, if there were a good 2 speed we'd use it.
Sorry, back to this thread again. Did you guys use the gear ratios found in the normal Mustang when you did this build?
 

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Did you guys use the gear ratios found in the normal Mustang when you did this build?
As mentioned earlier, it apparently uses a Getrag MT82. Hollie Maea can provide the correct answer, but my guess is that since the ratios in it are mostly unsuitable, it likely has one of the stock ratio sets for a Mustang (there are more than one). The MT82 has a poor reputation, and the consensus seems to be that the best way to improve it is to replace it with a Tremec, which Ford does with higher-power Mustang variants. If changing ratios, it would be easier and make more sense to put in the shortest final drive (ring and pinion at the diff) rather than messing with any transmission, especially the MT82.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
As mentioned earlier, it apparently uses a Getrag MT82. Hollie Maea can provide the correct answer, but my guess is that since the ratios in it are mostly unsuitable, it likely has one of the stock ratio sets for a Mustang (there are more than one). The MT82 has a poor reputation, and the consensus seems to be that the best way to improve it is to replace it with a Tremec, which Ford does with higher-power Mustang variants. If changing ratios, it would be easier and make more sense to put in the shortest final drive (ring and pinion at the diff) rather than messing with any transmission, especially the MT82.
We got a special transmission from Ford, with billet gears. I think the ratios were the same, but it was highly specialized for high power. If I remember right they said they only make a few of them per year.
 

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We got a special transmission from Ford, with billet gears. I think the ratios were the same, but it was highly specialized for high power. If I remember right they said they only make a few of them per year.
That makes sense: it's not the right transmission, it's the one that they have available in a version modified for more power handling. Thanks. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
That makes sense: it's not the right transmission, it's the one that they have available in a version modified for more power handling. Thanks. :)
That's right. It was not specially designed for this project. If my memory is right it was typically an aftermarket part for the Ford GT, but like I said they only made a few per year. That came straight from Ford so I can only imagine how much it might have cost.
 
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