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I've seen several people who say series wound motors are better for vehicle applications. (Than permanent magnet motors)

But it seems like the only series wound motors in the smaller form (similar to bldc size) are golf cart motors. Aside from that the next step is 6.7" and up in series.

Would a golf cart series wound motor be big enough to move a 2wd 4 wheeler around with better than "golf cart" performance?

If one went with one of the higher revving series motors? Like 6hp or more with 3,500, 4,500 or 5,500 rpm max?


I have looked, but I have had difficulty finding anything(on this site) about golf cart motors.

Is it possible to have a motor rebuilt without the female output shaft with a more standard output shaft, or is the innie advantageous somehow?

I see that many of the fork lift motors that end up being run at 72, 96 or higher volts start life with a name tag saying 36 or 48v, so could you treat a 36 or 48v golf cart motor the same way?

I'm looking for information and opinions.
 

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I've seen several people who say series wound motors are better for vehicle applications. (Than permanent magnet motors)

But it seems like the only series wound motors in the smaller form (similar to bldc size) are golf cart motors. Aside from that the next step is 6.7" and up in series.

Would a golf cart series wound motor be big enough to move a 2wd 4 wheeler around with better than "golf cart" performance?

If one went with one of the higher revving series motors? Like 6hp or more with 3,500, 4,500 or 5,500 rpm max?


I have looked, but I have had difficulty finding anything(on this site) about golf cart motors.

Is it possible to have a motor rebuilt without the female output shaft with a more standard output shaft, or is the innie advantageous somehow?

I see that many of the fork lift motors that end up being run at 72, 96 or higher volts start life with a name tag saying 36 or 48v, so could you treat a 36 or 48v golf cart motor the same way?

I'm looking for information and opinions.
Golf cart motors are 6.6 or 6.7" diameter wound field motors. Several companies make them. One is D & D Motors. They also make a fairly extensive line of 6.6" motors many having normal output shafts, DEH/bearing and fans. They also come in long stack (high torque) and 8 brush (high current) models.

The typical golf cart motor is totally enclosed without DEH/bearing and mates directly to the axle with the internal spline shaft. These also typically have the economy short comm and small brushes. It isn't worthwhile to mod these. A few guys have for go cart or MC projects but it is usually easier to just get a 2 bearing motor. There are a lot of them out there.

Disclaimer: I have no interest in D&D but have used their motors and liked them.
 

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My two cents worth as I have a bit of experience with Golf Cart motors and conversions.

Golf Cart motors in general come in two Flavors of series wound and shunt wound. Some manufactures like EZGO have moved away from series in favor of shunt wound.

In the world of DIY golf cart motors Series are still popular because of lower cost and easier to control. There big advantage is Torque, low end torque and speed is not very important. In Series motors come in two flavors of their own, Torque and Speed. However speed is a bit ironic because series motors are not known for speed because torque and RPM are inversely proportional to each other.

Golf Cart manufactures are beginning to move away from DC motors in favor of AC 3-phase induction BLDC motors. EZGO offered the RXV back in 2007 and outperforms any of the stock DC motors. Yamaha and Club Car will offer AC versions in model year 2015. With a Curtis Controller programmer, and a change in differential ratio gear to 8:1 the RVX is a 36 mph cart. EZGO also offers a LSV which is the RXV with real brakes and meets DOT requirements for street legal and already has the speed gear but controller limits it to 27 mph but just like the RXV with a controller programmer will do 36 mph

For those of us that cannot wait have already made the switch. HPEV offers 3 AC motors that are direct bolt in replacements and out perform both any AC or DC stock motors and every upgraded DC series and shunt wound motors. The stumbling block is cost. For $1000 dollars you can get a beast of a DC motor with controller from Plum Quick, but all you are going to get is 25 to 30 mph. AC will cost $2000 to $2600 but you get better acceleration rates and up to 45 mph easily.

Hopefully AC motors and controller prices will come down as demand increases. I think in as little as 10 years stock golf carts will be strictly AC. With DC in golf carts you have to choose between torque or speed. You cannot have both. With AC you can have your cake and eat it too.
 
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