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Fair point, and yes, 22kWh. (just lazy typing)
22 kwh may not give you the range you expect
You will have 750 kg + 80 kg - 830 kg
My car is 800 kg with 14 kwh - and my range is about 50 km - just over 30 miles - when cruising at 100 kph
So that would give you about 45 miles range - not the 100 miles you expect
 

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Ioniq EV + ???
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
No serious production car would put an electric motor in the front to drive the rear wheels. There's no reason to do it, and no reason to accommodate the resulting shaft down the middle of the car. In an EV, the largest mass is the battery - that's what is critical to mass distribution, not the motor. To keep the character of the car, it would need to keep roughly equal front:rear weight distribution and rear wheel drive, not the location of the motor.

Mass distribution, not just the change (normally increase) in vehicle mass, is a major factor in the changes needed to properly accommodate a conversion.

Most builders don't worry about this much, because they are not seriously interested in handling (or stability, or durability)... but of course there are exceptions. With rare exceptions, "performance" in EV conversions usually means just acceleration, or in some cases the ability to burn rubber.
I suspect you are right, in general, but you don't have to look far to see lots of things that don't make perfect sense. Mazda (if it does an electric MX5) will need to decide what it does with the FR heritage. Front 100kW motor, skateboard-style battery pack on either side of the transmission tunnel and a grippy rear differential? As an ex-MX5 owner, I'd be interested in that.
 
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