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Just dropping in to say hi and introduce myself. I'm the technical IT chick, my wife is the gearhead.

We have a 2002 1.6 petrol Renault Megane, and Adobe from a few dings and scratches is in really good nick. It's maybe not the greatest conversion, so don't want to put a ton into it, really only need to hit 100 mile range for it to be a daily for us.

My brother in law does imports and has a few proper old cars in his shed, but I have my eye on his 2 door Morris Minor that is in need of a lot of bodywork. I really want to turn that one into an EV, but have to kinda prove that I can.

Looking forward to the research and getting told why I'm a total moron 馃槀
 

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Just dropping in to say hi and introduce myself. I'm the technical IT chick, my wife is the gearhead.

We have a 2002 1.6 petrol Renault Megane, and Adobe from a few dings and scratches is in really good nick. It's maybe not the greatest conversion, so don't want to put a ton into it, really only need to hit 100 mile range for it to be a daily for us.

My brother in law does imports and has a few proper old cars in his shed, but I have my eye on his 2 door Morris Minor that is in need of a lot of bodywork. I really want to turn that one into an EV, but have to kinda prove that I can.

Looking forward to the research and getting told why I'm a total moron 馃槀
Hello I was born in Scotland in Helensburgh many many moons ago............... A beautiful country with truly great whisky.
OK so I will tell you this, to get any production vehicle to go 100miles will take a lot of batteries, how many and how far a vehicle goes depends upon:
(1) Aerodynamics - which involves the frontal area of the vehicle presented to the air and its slipperiness which is known as COD ( coefficient of drag)
(2) Weight
(3) How heavy footed you are
(4) How hilly the terrain is !!!! well its the Highlands so pretty hilly
(5) How much headwind you have
(6) Without some temperature management ambient temperature in winter will affect range and recharge times
I recommend to get your head around just how important number 1 & 2 are look up your vehicles frontal area and COD you can generally find this type of information on line somewhere. Then compare that to a 100mile range production electric vehicle and see what size battery pack it has. A Nissan Leaf would be a good starting point for comparison.
If your COD and/ or frontal area and /or final vehicle weight are higher you will need more batteries than the leaf. The most battery draining factors in descending order are
(1) Frontal Area
(2) COD
(3) Weight - but when I say this I mean the amount of weight over a compared vehicle as obviously the lighter the vehicle the further it will go and you have some known's in terms of weight already. To get your weight as a very rough estimate find out your engine weight (less transmission) & gas tank full weight subtract them then add on the weight of an appropriate electric motor & your batteries and this should give you an approximation within 100lbs of true final weight.
I hope this helps, dont be afraid to ask questions, when you know very little to start with there are no stupid questions.
In my humble opinion electrifying most production cars cost a good bit of money and time for not a very good return in terms of range and charge time and that's because they are inherently very heavy and have a large frontal area but it all depends upon what you are prepared to spend and what your personal goal is so don't let my put you off look into it and if nothing else learn some things you never knew before
 

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EVMAC makes good points - I will add that speed also plays a factor. 100 miles on the freeway will take more energy than 100 miles on back country roads due to the non-linear nature of aerodynamic drag.

I do not yet have any real world data to back up any of my claims, but the rule of thumb that I heard a lot of people throw out is that you should figure 10% of your vehicles weight in pounds equals the watt-hours per mile. A 3500lb truck would need 350wh/mile, or a 35kwh pack to go 100 miles. A 2000lb sports car might make the same distance on 20kwh. Your milage may vary.

If hills abound, and range is critical, regenerative braking might be worth having. You probably shouldnt bank on it getting you more than a 10% boost, but if it doesnt cost more than 10% more spent on batteries, then why not? It has the advantage of weighing less than adding battery capacity.
 
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