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To piggyback on what DMPstar said, Phillips Screw Company has a drive profile called "External MorTorq Super Spiral"
As the "spiral" part of the name suggests, that drive is directional - the fastener in this case is not.

Looks a lot like the screws on a Super Nintendo but maybe a bit bigger. Sometimes referred to as "Triwing".
Tools look like this: View attachment 129649
That looks promising, but it's not Tri-Wing® (which is very different).

I don't know what this is - they seem to be offered under the name "gamebit", or specifically as security screw sockets for Nintendo products, but might actually be for "line head" bolts. This might be the LH-5 size.

I don't know where you might find the right socket, and I assume that's the reason for the manufacturer's choice: they don't want you to be able to open it, especially without destroying the bolt head and thus leaving evidence of tampering.
 

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Two traditional shade tree mechanic techniques: a sharp chisel ot drift punch across one of the tangs at an oblique angle or beat on a 12point harbor frieght short socket, probably metric so it is a tight initial fit. Replace with normal head. Wouldn't suprise me that it's left hand thread either.

Years ago true vaule had a pin containing socket that would fit anything

Although the welding idea has a certain panache
 

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It certainly is a well kept secret tamper proof design.

To get one off i think you could use an 8mm or 5/16" socket and 2 short pieces of 1/16" or (1- 2 mm) brass or steel rod. Hold the rod pieces in opposing divots of the screw head with needle nose pliers while sliding into the apex of the hex socket. If you only have 1mm rod then it might need 3 rods in the divots in order to fill up the socket apexs. Simple cheap and easy enough to try without any welding.

i found a security socket known as tri-groove which might work but couldn't find dimensions.

Those 3.5 and 4.5 mm sockets shown earlier have the right shape but obviously too small.

Good luck let us know what you find that works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·

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what is the diameter and pitch of the threads on the extracted bolt--it looks like a very fine thread? M5 or M4

The 5 lobe or spline bit should be available, maybe called a star torx bit.
 

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If you cant find the 5point star tool, a modified pipe extractor might work definitely a ground down screw extractor that is oversized.

Other than paying a large fortune, do any of the auto tool people have these displayed on a web site?
 

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When I encounter a bolt like this, that I'm going to replace anyway, or a broken off bolt or stud, I'll just MIG weld a blob of metal to the exposed end. Then you have something to weld a short, regular hex bolt to that can be used to remove the problem bolt or stud.

This does require some welding skills and a lot of practice.
 

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When I encounter a bolt like this, that I'm going to replace anyway, or a broken off bolt or stud, I'll just MIG weld a blob of metal to the exposed end. Then you have something to weld a short, regular hex bolt to that can be used to remove the problem bolt or stud.

This does require some welding skills and a lot of practice.
You could also use a broken screw extractor, even though the bolt isn't technically broken.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
When I encounter a bolt like this, that I'm going to replace anyway, or a broken off bolt or stud, I'll just MIG weld a blob of metal to the exposed end. Then you have something to weld a short, regular hex bolt to that can be used to remove the problem bolt or stud.

This does require some welding skills and a lot of practice.
Interesting idea. Though, I think I'd be terrified to fry the electronics parts inside. I bet those bolts come in contact within the ground plane if the PCB.
 

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You're not going to fry anything by welding to the head of the bolt.

I bet those bolts do not come in contact with the groundplane of the pcb...can't see the board edge and it would be near-impossible to seal a board sandwich.

But, it's all moot. The bolt is out. The second head is somewhat conventional.
 
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