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74 Karmann Ghia Convertible with Autostick and 2009 Gen2 Prius
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know about the EV West kit. My Ghia has the Autostick transmission. Any suggestions or links to good threads would be greatly appreciated. I'm also interested to see if anyone has electrified a Gen2 Prius by replacing the ICE engine with an Electric motor and or an extra battery pack. I'm very interested also in previous projects with hub motor. Thanks in advance and I'm glad I finally took the plunge to join the forum. Glen
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Welcome! :)

These are three very different subjects, so they should probably each have their own discussion thread:
My Ghia has the Autostick transmission. Any suggestions or links to good threads would be greatly appreciated.
I'm also interested to see if anyone has electrified a Gen2 Prius by replacing the ICE engine with an Electric motor and or an extra battery pack.
I'm very interested also in previous projects with hub motor.
 

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Have a '69 Ghia coupe. Am in the middle of the conversion so can only offer a few insights. Car has 44 CALB 100AH cells, an AC-51C motor, and Curtis 1239 controller. To me the motor is just the right size, I only do surface streets. The car is so much fun to drive.

Have had two issues. Both were simple and due to being a newbie. First one was due to 50 year old wiring. Was solved by cleaning up contacts and getting rid of wires from past aftermarket radios and gauges. Second was due to not programing the controller for my application. Got a handheld programmer and not only solved my problem but is a heck of a lot of fun changing the settings such as regen.

What I wish I understood when I was starting out:
The car is now torn apart and am redoing things. I read this and did not take it to heart. Sort of like having kids. No mater what people told me it would be like I did not understand it until it happened.
First: Rewire the car. The wiring harness kits are not too expensive and it is getting rid of many ghost issues
Second: Install the motor
Third: Install the battery. Make a model of the battery box out of cardboard or foam. Then make the box
Forth: Install everything else around the motor and battery
The other stuff such as wiring, gauges, and the charger are fun and make it look like it is coming together, but the battery placement is key.

As to your question on Autostick. A fellow I know with a Corvair conversion likes it. Tried it on the Ghia and did not like it. Have an IRS and I like it. Much simpler.

Look at the images on the web for where to place things. Videos and images from EV West have been a great help with finguring the layout and buying stuff that I break or want to change. Fast delivery. Parts for my conversion came from EV4U. This suited me as I want a hobby car and will be constantly fiddling with it. They have been quite helpful in answering my questions. I like to understand what I am doing and why which is what they are really good at.
 

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74 Karmann Ghia Convertible with Autostick and 2009 Gen2 Prius
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Have a '69 Ghia coupe. Am in the middle of the conversion so can only offer a few insights. Car has 44 CALB 100AH cells, an AC-51C motor, and Curtis 1239 controller. To me the motor is just the right size, I only do surface streets. The car is so much fun to drive.

Have had two issues. Both were simple and due to being a newbie. First one was due to 50 year old wiring. Was solved by cleaning up contacts and getting rid of wires from past aftermarket radios and gauges. Second was due to not programing the controller for my application. Got a handheld programmer and not only solved my problem but is a heck of a lot of fun changing the settings such as regen.

What I wish I understood when I was starting out:
The car is now torn apart and am redoing things. I read this and did not take it to heart. Sort of like having kids. No mater what people told me it would be like I did not understand it until it happened.
First: Rewire the car. The wiring harness kits are not too expensive and it is getting rid of many ghost issues
Second: Install the motor
Third: Install the battery. Make a model of the battery box out of cardboard or foam. Then make the box
Forth: Install everything else around the motor and battery
The other stuff such as wiring, gauges, and the charger are fun and make it look like it is coming together, but the battery placement is key.

As to your question on Autostick. A fellow I know with a Corvair conversion likes it. Tried it on the Ghia and did not like it. Have an IRS and I like it. Much simpler.

Look at the images on the web for where to place things. Videos and images from EV West have been a great help with figuring the layout and buying stuff that I break or want to change. Fast delivery. Parts for my conversion came from EV4U. This suited me as I want a hobby car and will be constantly fiddling with it. They have been quite helpful in answering my questions. I like to understand what I am doing and why which is what they are really good at.
Thanks so much for the response and the advice. I'm still reading through and looking at options for the transmission / drivetrain options. I wanted to buy the EV-West kit but I'm going to have to save up my wife is none to keen on the idea. I've already obtained roughly 10KW of Samsung 18650s with 3200AH each. I'm aiming for a 20KW pack minimum in the end as I want to eventually make it my daily. Luckily the local VW guy has gotten inspiration from my project and can easily hook me up with a good wire harness, he was already on that before when I was contemplating putting the ICE motor back together (Carb-fire). It is a Texas Ghia with 104,000 on the car. After the carb fire it sat for 26 years in a climate controlled garage. I've been reading the book "Convert It" by Ron Toms and it has a ton of straight forward formulas and advice for planning out the project. Interesting that you worked with EV4U I have looked at their stuff too. Are they less expensive than EV-West? Anyway thanks again. I'll be sure to update the thread as things progress. I hope you continue to have fun with your build too.
 

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Are they less expensive than EV-West?
I have bought parts from EV West and not a kit. My impression is that the purchase price of the EV West kit is more, you will get a fully finished car that is easier to put together and the kit will contain all that they have learned to make it easier and a better car. Sort of like following a recipe.

My car was running and a lot of fun. Now it is take apart so I can make changes and improvements from what I learned. The components that you get from EV4U comes at a lower price. Many of the parts are the exact same ones that you get from EV West. EV4U offers a class that I am planning on taking. Before I didn't know what I didn't know. Now when I take the class I will understand much more and then make more changes. In the end I am sure that I will be spending more by going the EV4U rout and have much more fun.

Others will know much more than I and the EV4U will be the lower cost option because they will do it they way they want the first time. Others will get the EV West kit and have a better car than mine. Both are good options. Mine seems to be the right one for me.
 

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74 Karmann Ghia Convertible with Autostick and 2009 Gen2 Prius
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I like the hands on learning approach of EV4U (I'm a teacher) and I'm contemplating doing this for a hobby/possible small business in retirement in 12-15 years.
 
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