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Honda Fit Conversion

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Does anybody have a recommendation for a kit traction drive system, or better yet a complete transplant from a junkyard, that would be a good fit to drop into my Honda Fit? I have a 2013 5-speed (manual) that I bought brand new; it's never had a big scratch, a drop of oil or a single real repair in 10 years, and it's a jewel to drive so I really hate to think of cutting it's heart out, but now I've been bitten by the EVirus and I can't think of another car I'd rather turn into my 1st conversion. (2nd project would be a '74 Spitfire)

I have moderate skills, (started out as a Navy submarine nuclear power plant electrician), and I've already gotten some good support from our local SEVA, but I still want to make it as easy as possible, (I'm a tech, not a designer or engineer), and would like to keep it as close to this generation's hardware as possible, (AC system with Regen at least, and a decent BMS please). I have some trade-offs I'm willing to make in performance, but it seems like the state of the art today is such that I SHOULD be able to build a 150 mile range with a top end of 70 mph, (all I need around Seattle), and still be able to drive it every day for another 10 (or 20?) years - with a clear conscience and a not-unlimited budget.

I'm just a Wannabe at this point, so please tell me if I'm out to lunch, but if you've seen any production EV's with a drive system, (with or without the battery - that's a separate challenge), that you think might work especially well in my baby, I'd appreciate all suggestions or advice. (btw, NOT impressed with the production Fit EV performance specs - that was a different era, no?)
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I can think of no reason to convert a perfectly fine, worthless, 35mpg bland car to EV. You never really gave one, and in fact gave reasons not to.

The cost to do so would put you at buying a used EV, so why bother?

I can easily think of another car....the Spitfire. So why not do the Spitfire and keep the Fit as a reliable daily driver?

To call the FWD Fit a warmup or skillbuilder for the Triumph is kidding yourself. It's peeing away your time and money for a permanent loss of both.

My $0.02...you are free to do as you wish, of course.
 

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Hi Ron.

Let me suggest you a classic conversion Kit: 9" ADC Series Motor and 144V600Amp Controller for $2500USD it includes harness, software for to configure the controller, Hall effect pedal, main contactor, heat sink for controller. This motor has great torque and power at $50% of comparable AC Kit (AC-51 or Hyper9Drive). I sell those components. Then NCA Samsung-Incell battery modules 48V100Ah each with built-in BMS (4.8KWH each). You can use 6 modules 2p3p (28kwh) or 9 modules 3p3s (43kwh) to get great range, they are sort of LEGOs, the ideal battery for conversions for many reasons: they can be turned ON or OFF, so they are very safe during installation, they have built-in breakers, there is no need to buy power fuses, this is better than any fuse because once a fuse burns, you have to have spare parts, tools and time to replace them you could need your EV to be toed in the middle of a freeway or street, breakers are greater by far: once opened (in extreme conditions), the BMS works for you, you would have no voltage source but you won't need tools, you simply close the breakers with your hands and you are back on the road in seconds. $1000 each module, This are all Samsung 21700 cells, not TESLAs or i3s but they are great, easy to do battery swap if needed, I've been using them in several conversions since 2019, in my opinion better than TESLA or any other battery pack because the BMS is inside, you do not have to wire or spend more bucks on BMS stuff. As individual cells TESLA's are better no doubt, you are free to choose TESLA cells or any other battery chemistry with the complexities, risks and extra money of BMS. You could use 800Amp or bigger controller, but I do not recommend more amperage because the motor gets stressed, many DC Series motors have been damaged with the super hyper expensive Zilla controller for instance.

You can convert your Honda Fit or any other car with this Kit.

Send me a private message if you are interested in more details.
 

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A budget DIY conversion to reach your goals will probably be north of $20K and will take a year of hard work before the wheels spin. And after the wheels start spinning another year of tinkering. And that's if you do all the fabrication yourself. This is an extremely complex undertaking. There are no drop-in kits, certainly not for a modern Honda. And the kits that do exist for some vehicles are more like collections of parts with some of the fabrication taken care of. There's still a lot of work and engineering involved.

Also, EV conversions benefit from a very simple donor vehicle. That Fit is very modern. Your power steering, power brakes, A/C and heater systems all rely on the gas engine to function, all will need expensive workarounds. Any screens and computers in the interior are going to be completely inoperable or full of warnings. A '74 spitfire, which has none of that stuff, is a far better candidate. Also you have a prayer of actually getting some money back on an enthusiast car if you decide to sell. I saw a very nice Triumph EV conversion advertised for $25k. He probably spent $35k on the parts, but at least he could get something out of it. If you take a common $3000 economy car and spend $20k on it, you've got yourself a scrap car and a bunch of used EV parts to put on ebay.

So ultimately the most reasonable thing to do is sell the Fit and buy a Bolt. If you really, really want to get into it choose the simplest car you can and preferably one with some kit/parts availability (cough cough VW bug).
 
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