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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After some initial research I would like to tackle converting my 73 Spitfire to an EV

Based on the Newbie Introduction,
I will answer the background questions upfront. (apologizing in advance fornthe length of the post)

Skill level:
Mechanical: High pre-1985, Medium post-1985
history: Started repairing cars and farm equipment beginning at age 9. At 12 Dave gave me a Chiltons manual and said I was reapinaible for keeping the cars up - he was tired of paying mechanics. At 13 was welding and fabricating, and Tried my hand at painting , but do not have the talent. Restored ariund 15 1953-1976 Cadillacs, Buicks, Mustangs, and now the Spitfire. All work done myself.
As an aside - I am an Electrical Engineer too so playimg a little outside my yard, but I think I can grasp the electrics. Rebuilt wiring harnesses, engines, clutches, more...

EV Range: I would like 150-200 miles prior to charging

Performance Level: Moderate - After all, it is still a Spitfire. But I am a performance junkie at times. I figure first cut aims for a little higher than middle of the Pack, , and I can upgrade perfomance as I better understand the tools amd components. With the immediate torque electric provides, the first cut will be grat anyway.

Investment: $7k..$10k for the EV alone (without the car cost, long since paid for and work already done - rebuilt suspensision, some other fixes). I willl slap myself later for putting that into a Spitfire. But it does have a soft spot from my military days.

Parts already considered: Too early to make a definitive list.
- Still absorbing differences in cost vs performance for drives,
- Still figuring out options for data collection and displays.
- Definitely would prefer CAN based data sensor reporting.
- Need to better understand wheel direct drive vs transmission connected drives,
- I havent even begun to consider electric vs mechanical steering.
- Plus understanding what the weighting change from drives and batteries does to handling to determine there best locations in the shell.
To handling before starting oreliminary design and the downslecting specific components,

Thanks! Any thougjts, or material to point me toward would be much appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Postlogue- Just read
“I want to build an EV, where do I start”
I found it extremely helpful.

I have some direction and planning to do now
Thank you
 

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there have been several Spitfire conversions discussed at length in this forum. It is definitely worth your time to read and learn from them, although you should keep in mind that some were long ago and technology does change. I've read them all, having joined the forum due to an interest in converting our Spitfire.

After you have looked at the options there is a lot to discuss, as suggested by your questions, but here's one that's simple:
- I havent even begun to consider electric vs mechanical steering.
If you can possibly keep the front axle load reasonable enough to keep the stock unassisted steering, that would be a good idea. The last thing this tiny car needs is more complication for something unnecessary such as steering boost.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wow, thank you! Thank you all for the superb direction. As you said, several Soitfire conversions are out there with parts and strategy. I am working my way but this will help immensely!

And thank you for the clue on the steering. I was really torn on what I would need to manage wheel force with the additional weight but that sounds like a rabbit hole.
 

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And thank you for the clue on the steering. I was really torn on what I would need to manage wheel force with the additional weight...
The challenge then becomes avoiding that additional weight on the front axle, by some combination of keeping the total mass down, putting enough of it behind the seats instead of in front, and keeping the mass in the front of the car behind the axle (like the original engine and transmission) rather than piled up in the nose.

This isn't easy - fitting in enough battery, especially without ruining the dynamics of the car - is one reason that I abandoned my plan to convert our Spitfire. It can be done well, of course - this was just one factor for my project.
 
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