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I have an impulse9 that I am not doing anything with and wonder if I could use it as an alternator/generator ?
Google has been unhelpful, the motor would be used to permanently produce power and not be used as a motor.
Its new home would be on a water wheel.

thanks for any help :)
 

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I'm no expert, but I think there are some technical challenges there. Since impulse9 is a series wound motor, there needs to be a way to excite a magnetic field into the rotor probably. Some alternators use residual magnetism and then build it up via feedback, but basically you may need to figure out some funky electricals around it. Otherwise it should work :)
 

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The series winding is the big issue. If you disconnect the field winding from the armature, and arrange a controlled power supply for the field, then you could use it as a separately excited generator (or motor).
 

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The series winding is the big issue. If you arranged a controlled power supply for the field winding, then you could use it as a separately excited generator (or motor).
Is there a reason you'd excite the field and not the armature ? Seems like most generators use a permanent field in the rotor. Since this is a commutated setup, I imagine it will naturally produce a pulsed DC output that will require a smoothing capacitor but no rectification ?
 

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Is there a reason you'd excite the field and not the armature ? Seems like most generators use a permanent field in the rotor.
The Impulse and similar brushed DC motors feed the rotor (armature) windings through a commutator, so the stator (field) has constant polarity - it could even be a permanent magnet. Machines built as alternators are normally the opposite: the constant side is the rotor (wound and fed a controlled current through slip rings, not a commutator) and the alternating side is the stator (connected to a rectifier). So the common automotive alternator is like a brushed DC motor inside-out: you control the rotor of the alternator and take the output from the stator; you would control the field (stator) of the Impulse and take the output from the rotor (armature).

Since this is a commutated setup, I imagine it will naturally produce a pulsed DC output that will require a smoothing capacitor but no rectification ?
Yes, and that's a big difference from a typical automotive alternator.
 
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