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If someone wants to play around with an induction motor, I'm selling a complete washing machine induction motor kit.


This is similar to the one I first used when I did my conversion. Includes the induction motor, with a built in speed sensor and the inverter than can be modified and driven from a microprocessor.


The auction links to a small video I did showing how to set everything up to run as stock. From there, the sky is the limit on the modifications one can make.



I think its rare to find such offerings on a complete kit, so i thought I would share here.


If you're a student this is a great kit to modify into your final project.



eBay Link: https://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/710-53481-19255-0/1?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fitm%2FHotpoint-washing-machine-PCB-control-Module-Electric-parts-repair-kit%2F254425616478%3Fhash%3Ditem3b3cf2d05e%3Ag%3ALTgAAOSw46Bd0pax&campid=5338531765&toolid=20008
 

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This is similar to the one I first used when I did my conversion. Includes the induction motor, with a built in speed sensor and the inverter than can be modified and driven from a microprocessor.

Do you have a link to your conversion or can you detail how you modified the inverter?
 

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Do you have a link to your conversion or can you detail how you modified the inverter?

My conversion is here, but most pictures are now gone. I started with a VFD - first by upgrading the power stage to 15 and 30KW and slowly moved away to my own microprocessor & control system based on a motor control dSPIC


The inverter, is no more than 3 half bridges made with mosfets or IGBT's, gate drivers and a stable voltage, backed by a large reservoir capacitor. The best way to start is to modify something already done, because the hardware is all there and setup in the right way. Induction motors can be powered by very low voltages (12 or 24V). They just wont spin very fast (or will, at the expense of torque) - but this is fine to learn and may save the mosfets from blowing up if something goes wrong.



Driving the mosfets the right way is the hardest part. Control them wrong and the half bridge is a direct short circuit across the supply terminals. Once this has been mastered, it is easy to scale to larger IGBT's and power levels.
 
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