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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I thought I'd post some photos of my LED headlight experiment. I'm using a single OPTEK, LED module (9 leds per module) in a test headlight assembly from a vehicle that used replaceable bulbs for the DIM, and the BRIGHT side of the assembly. These photos are showing one module mounted in the reflector of one side of the headlight. One photo is the assembly with the room lights on, another is with the room lights off, and the last is the LED headlight assembly sitting on top of a headlight with a factory bulb in place. The LED light, has a much nicer cast on objects, and the objects look more like they do in the sunlight to me. What do you guys think? I'm going for less battery consumption here, along with a better light, than the YELLOW look I get from the original bulbs. The camera doesn't really do them justice, but I'm not sure how to photograph something illuminating light anyhow.
 

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It looks good.

Do you have a cost comparison and a power consumed comparison X 2?

Trying to figure if the light is worth the cost for DIY.

Since the longest run at night, would be only 5 to 8 miles, I probably won't convert, but I like the idea of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
It looks like my DIM headlights use aprox 4amps each, and the LED Headlights use aprox 1amp each. The LED modules are 10watts @ 330Lumens. So I'd be saving 6amps worth of power alone on just the DIM headlights. I plan on switching to LED's on all the light bulbs that are usually illuminated continuously when driving at night, along with the brake & turn signal bulbs. This all should help conserve power during night driving.

LED's do cost more than normal bulbs, but they last much longer also, along with the power savings, that will help my range with the Aux battery, or load decrease on the DC/DC converter will be worth it in the long run, not to mention they are just COOL looking.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I just replaced all my running lamps with LED versions today. At least all the lights that are on continously when driving at night, along with the turn signal lights. I had the lights on, while changing them out, just to make sure I changed all the ones that needed changing - Boy do normal bulbs get HOT!! even at just 12volts, what a waste of energy.

I like the idea of showing the LED Headlight on a sign @ 50ft, compared to the original headlight @ 50ft. I'll post some photos of that test when I get a chance to perform it.
 

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We've all seen plenty of LED taillights, turn signals and everything but headlights. I've been skeptical that they're bright enough to cover a good amount of area, so I'm looking forward to your tests..
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just when I thought I had the market cornered for LED Headlights:

Audi presents pure-LED headlights

Christoph Hammerschmidt
EE Times Europe
08/10/2007 9:24 AM
MUNICH, Germany — Audi claims to be the first car manufacturer using LED headlights. The company has developed a headlight assembly in which all lighting functions are implemented as semiconductors.

The assembly contains low-beam headlamps as the main function, consisting of two LED arrays with four active elements each, embedded in a free-form reflector. Three additional LED arrays with two LED chips each are located behind an optical lens; their task is controlling the bright/dark boundary and the range of the headlights. For the high-beam headlight, a four-LED array is located adjacent to the low-beam arrays. Near the lower edge of the assembly, a row of 24 LEDs forms the daytime running light. Further elements of the lighting assembly are printed circuit boards carrying the LED chips and a heat sink. In addition, a blower is provided to keep the LEDs cool and to de-ice the unit.

At a current of 1 A, each LED array achieves a luminous flux of 600 lumen, Audi claims. For the future, the company plans to combine the LED technology with other innovative semiconductor-driven headlamp technologies such as swiveling headlights.
 

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Just an FYI, Lexus is the automaker using LED headlights. A few others are starting to use them for signal lights. I even bought some replacement LED turn signal lights at Pep boys.

They are the wave of the future, longer lasting much less power and less heat.

I even buy LED AC bulbs for my solar grid tied home ccrane.com I have checked anhd they do use 1/10 the AC of a regular bulb. They are so cool you can't feel any heat from them. In AZ in the summer heat that saves twice.
 

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I'm not Anti-LED, my taillights are LED installed by previous owner.
But, until I can go to PepBoys or AutoZone and get them there (legally approved for headlight use) , or If they pass multiple TexomaEV distance tests, I'd rather be safe than sorry. I'd hate to kill someone especially myself on account of a few amps...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ouch, Mannyman - I don't want to kill anyone either..... But I like experimenting with LED's. I think by changing out all my other bulbs (over 12ea not counting the headlights) which pulled at least 1amp or more each when driving at night to LED's saves quite abit on power consumption. This will extend my field winding's power pack range, since this pack also drives my DC/DC converter which charges my AUX battery once it hits 12vdc. The aux battery of course drives all the car's accessories, IE: Fans, Lights, etc.... If I were to get an LED headlight to illuminate nicely, I plan to use them in the place of the built in fog lights of the Eclipse. This would still give me the ability to use the regular headlights, but if power started declining, at least I could switch over to the LED Headlights to get me home, maybe ---:>)
 

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Hey, I'm right behind you. I'm hoping you succeed.
They just have match or exceed a non LED headlight in range...
Having them as an emergency backup is a good idea too.

I must be getting old, because I remember a time I didn't care if I killed anyone ;)...plus the motorcycle and skydiving didn't speak much for my self preservation either...

So what's your total range again? It's a bummer that we have to plan our trips according to our battery packs or budget in time for recharging.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
So far, I've only driven the car around 20miles per charge, keeping the pack as close to 50% DOD and that's the reading during the trip. If I let the pack recover a few minutes, the meter actually comes back up to around 25% DOD. So, I'm guessing my range would be around 30miles. Remember though, I'm playing with only a 78vdc main pack, since I can't build my EV over 80vdc here in okiEVille. This is why I need to conserve power everywhere I can.
 

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Very good idea to use led for headlamp but if the output is not sufficient you could use hid and still save since they use about 3.5A generally and they produce a much better output than regular year 1800 technology.as for the rest of your car you can save a lot more if you replace all light with led. as a example i replaced all 194 bulb in the gages assembly with led and it went from 1.3A to 0.071A.
 

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Another technology out there that IS great for headlights is HID (high intensity discharge)

They are very bright and use less power.

However, they need a ballast and take a minute or two to get to full power (sort of like gymnasium lights).

Seems like the trade-offs might be good for an electric vehicle.

Just Google "HID headlights" and there will be more than you ever want to know about them.

I am a big fan of LEDs and will wire up my bike with them as I can afford it.
For now, I am just sticking with my big old energy-sucking single headlamp on my cycle. I would like to replace it with something more efficient, but needs to be affordable as well.

Too bad I can't just screw in a compact fluorescent bulb!:D
 

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I'm not Anti-LED, my taillights are LED installed by previous owner.
But, until I can go to PepBoys or AutoZone and get them there (legally approved for headlight use) , or If they pass multiple TexomaEV distance tests, I'd rather be safe than sorry. I'd hate to kill someone especially myself on account of a few amps...
I think Mannyman is right on the money here. I believe LED headlamps will need to be D.O.T. (department of transportation) approved. Until you see conversion kits like the H4 or HID ones...I would consider it illegal. Perhaps if they do illuminate adequately though...the cops might mistake them for HID and you can get away with it?
 

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When it comes to LED headlights, I have to agree to wait till it becomes commercially available. I saw lab experiments that lead me to believe that what might be required for a headlight would take numerous LED chips that run so hot that it would necessitate water cooling. For now, stick with the smaller red, yellow, white bulbs that are somewhat reasonable. Now that would be appropriate for an EV. I can’t find a right angle stop light for my 94 S10… yet.

Also, headlights take 4-5 amps each (~50 watts). In the big scheme of things, that means ~1 amp at 120 volts of my system, which is nothing compared to the motor amps we all waste. I try to reduce motor amps as I drive (with an egg under my foot), but a bump in the pavement easily jumps it up 5-10 amps. If really trying to shave amps, go with an AC motor for better efficiency. But this is my first EV. The experience will dictate what would be nice on EV #2.
 

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I dont know if you ever mesured current draw when you put your lights on but i was able to shave about 22amps by replacing all lamps with led exept for headlamp wich i replaced with HID.Add to these the interior lamp reduction of another 3.5 amps .If you only dirive in daylight i agree that it may not be a must but if you use you lights you might be supprised of the end result.Dont forget that if you use an inverter to make 12v from you main battery pack you loose even more because of efficiency of the conversion.
 

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On my 120V system, it does charge the 12V battery from the pack. The E-Meter shows 2.1-2.2 amp draw with the key & lights "ON". That does convert (by Ohm's Law) to 22 amps/hr at 12V as you say, or 264 watts/hr.
What I am saying is that 132 watts in an half hour is nothing when I travel 14 miles at night and need about 7000 watts to recharge. I am all for saving money but the return on investment will take a long time to recoup.
 
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