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Hi, still currently shopping and trying to figure the investment of the conversion

Now that is settled I need to know how long a Motor + Controler + battery lasts with the Canadian Winters!

I know it depends on how well it is water proof but in general?

Thanks
 

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Hi, still currently shopping and trying to figure the investment of the conversion

Now that is settled I need to know how long a Motor + Controler + battery lasts with the Canadian Winters!

I know it depends on how well it is water proof but in general?

Thanks
The motor and controller, under reasonable care and conditions, will likely outlast you. The batteries will depend upon the kind of battery and the depth of draw, how high and how often you are pulling high amps, etc. If I were just going to put out a number, for an appropriately sized pack, with appropriate discharge levels, and reasonable driving, maybe 3-5 years for PbA. If you're letting them get cold (you don't have a garage and don't heat them) then maybe 2-3 years.
 

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Thank you

So basically I should cont my 10,000$ investment on 10 years?




and for the batteries I wanted to put them in a heated (room temp box)

for the night

eg; back home / work plug in the charger that heats the batteries to room temp
 

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Actually, as cold relates to the life of a lead-acid battery ... and assuming you are not leaving them in a state of discharge and all other factors being equal.... the lower tempuratures will actually increase the life of the battery. Most battery performance numbers are based on 75F. Above this number, output increases slightly and life is shortened. Below it, output is decreased and life is lengthened. This is a very significant point particularly for buying AGM's if used.
 

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DIYguy is right, keeping them cold does prolong the life because it slows self-discharge. However, if you use the batteries while they are cold, you will experience more losses, and you will be drawing the batteries down much further, which hurts the life.

The best way to keep your cost over time down is to put the cost upfront. That is, say you have a pack that gives you 30 miles at 80% DoD, and you go 30 miles every day. You're not hurting the batteries but you only get standard life. If you instead get a pack that would do 60 miles to 80% DoD, and only go 30 miles each day, you're cutting your cycles in half, and would roughly double the life of the battery, which brings your cost over time down.
 
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