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Personally I'm new to the whole electric conversion idea but was enthralled by some results I saw online. With that being said the project in mind would be an early 2000's Subaru Impreza Wagon (want WRX but seems pointless considering the conversion, I could just buy a hood with a scoop after the fact, lol). I would want this vehicle to maintain it's AWD capabilities and be dual motor. I've read up on the topic a little and have realized the difficulties of this would be a real trick. I had one main idea that I was hoping for advice on but obviously am open to any different suggestions to make this idea work. Essentially I would want to have one motor per axel with the motors attached at the differential (obviously this would require changing the gearing in the differential to better suit an EV). This is the idea, I'm open to any and all suggestions that might make this work. As well if this isn't the best way to achieve a dual motor AWD conversion I'd appreciate it if yall could point me in the right direction. Sorry for the long post, thanks.
 

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The best way to do that would be to fit two production EV drive units - that way you get modern kit

If you go old fashioned then the rear is easy - just a short driveshaft from a forklift motor to the diff
The front is more difficult
 

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The best way to do that would be to fit two production EV drive units - that way you get modern kit
I agree. If using modern AC motors with appropriate battery voltage, only gear ratio is needed, and a single-ratio reduction gearbox intended for an EV application makes more sense than adapting anything to bits intended for use with an engine. The big problem likely fitting the rear drive unit into a car designed for only a small final drive unit at the rear axle.

One caveat is that all production EVs have simple open differentials, while something like a WRX typically has limited-slip differentials.

If you go old fashioned then the rear is easy - just a short driveshaft from a forklift motor to the diff
The front is more difficult
Again, I agree.
If you keep the largely pointless transaxle - which is especially pointless with a Subaru if you're not using the AWD system - the front is more difficult only because you need to arrange to mount the motor directly to the transaxle input rather than using a short driveshaft as an easy-to-build adapter.


One possibility is a combination of approaches, with one motor driving the rear axle via the original final drive unit (differential), and another motor as part of a complete salvaged drive unit for the front axle.
 

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This is close to an idea I am nurturing at the moment :)


I am thinking along the lines of a Subaru Legacy estate with a manual gearbox. I would remove the engine and go in (probably with a leaf motor) on the input shaft to the gearbox, just as Damien Maguire does on his BMW conversions on YouTube.


This way I still get the 4x4 and the like and don't have to worry about driving two motors, (1 front, 1 rear).




Cheers,


Andy.
 
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