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I did the same for my EV and they are working great.

On the EVDL today there was a fellow asking just how hot his cables should get!

NONE HOT AT ALL, is my idea on that. Use large enough cable that you can drive 10+ miles and they remain cool to the touch.
 

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I like your idea of drilling a hole to insert the solder. I've always built cables with that style lug with the pre-portioned slugs of solder. Chuck the connector in a vise, drop in the slug, stick the wire in the hole, blast the wire and connector until it fluxes and remove heat.

Having said all that, I've always been told that solder should not be the sole mechanical connection, such as when you use too small a wire on too large a hole in a PCB.
 

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Excellent web page. Can you add an entry in the wiki area for this? When it comes time to make cables, I definitely want to be able to find it.

Thanks,

ga2500ev
 

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...I've always been told that solder should not be the sole mechanical connection...
I was thinking the same thing. All you have holding that connection together is solder and heat shrink tubing?

I'm not knocking your system or your method, I just think I would still give them a crimp. Thats just me.
 

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If your wires/cables are sized for the job, there won't be any heat to bother an uncrimped cable end.

It is just a matter of personal choice....Remember, starter battery cables have a lead clamp, that is formed on the end of the cable.....not possible to clamp.

I make cables for car clubs and CAST the original style lead clamp ends on welding cable......no clamp.....just lead.......lasts for only about 20+ years...
 

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If your wires/cables are sized for the job, there won't be any heat to bother an uncrimped cable end.
I'm sorry, but I must disagree with that. No amount of wire diameter will mitigate a bad connection. Bad connections cause heat all by themselves, regardless of wire diameter.

I understand the comparison of cast lead with solder, but remember that solder melts at a lower temperature than lead. If you have connectivity resistance sufficient to melt the solder, and if solder is your only electron bridge from the terminal post to the wire, then your connection will be short-lived.
 

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I'm sorry, but I must disagree with that. No amount of wire diameter will mitigate a bad connection. Bad connections cause heat all by themselves, regardless of wire diameter.

I understand the comparison of cast lead with solder, but remember that solder melts at a lower temperature than lead. If you have connectivity resistance sufficient to melt the solder, and if solder is your only electron bridge from the terminal post to the wire, then your connection will be short-lived.
I agree with this, but it really depends on the type of solder you use. Some of the blends conduct very well and if your wires are well oversized the solder won't really heat. HOWEVER!!!

In my experience with high power audio systems that actually need to run 1/0 cabling, we were always told to NEVER solder UNLESS you did so on the ends for holding strength, filed down any excess (which you shouldn't have if you solder properly) and then take a thin sheath or plate, cut the sheath into a plate and bend that plate around the metal, solder that together (can't weld it) and crimp it. Oh, and don't forget your shrinkwrap.


Generally though for high power connections good quality gold or silver plated screw pressure held junctions were preferred. With a properly sized junction the wire only just fits, the screw pushed it out for a full contact plus through the screw, and the gold or silver plating nearly eliminates the normal resistance of these connectors.
 
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