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On the end of the charge cord, like seen on many hair dryers, would be one option. Since outdoor and garage outlets are supposed to have GFCI protection built in you shouldn't need to add it if you have a newer home. There are less options for 240 vac GFCI protectors, but they are available because they are used on hot tub installations.
I just installed it in a sub panel in the garage, and ran it to a 240VAC outlet I install right next to the sub panel. I use one of those 240V/30A "generator" extension cords sold at Home Depot to plug in the car (I pull at most about 16A).
So in the car, or on the wall?
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I checked and found just over 100 VDC on all connections, and switched to AC and got about 20 VAC. Also checked the chargers ground wire to the trucks ground and got nothing.

Wasn't brave (or stupid) enough to reach down and check the voltage across the motor. Kinda concerns me as the motor was hot after an hour since my 15 mile drive in below 32 degree weather, making me believe there's voltage across the motor when charging.

If I ever get the time...
 

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I checked and found just over 100 VDC on all connections, and switched to AC and got about 20 VAC. Also checked the chargers ground wire to the trucks ground and got nothing.

Wasn't brave (or stupid) enough to reach down and check the voltage across the motor. Kinda concerns me as the motor was hot after an hour since my 15 mile drive in below 32 degree weather, making me believe there's voltage across the motor when charging.

If I ever get the time...
If there was enough voltage across the motor to make it warm during charging, then your controller is messed up, and the motor would be trying to turn. This would be a very bad situation and highly unlikely, not to mention it being a very unsafe vehicle.
 

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I checked and found just over 100 VDC on all connections, and switched to AC and got about 20 VAC. Also checked the chargers ground wire to the trucks ground and got nothing.

If I ever get the time...
Does your Curtis controller have a precharge resistor across the contactor? If so, the B+ of the controller and all motor connections will have DC HV with respect to battery negative. This is normal.

You will ALWAYS have a DC potential with respect to chassis due to leakage. This is normal.

You may have nothing wrong. :)

Russ Kaufmann

RUSSCO
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I like your answer the best, nothings wrong. The precharge resistor is on the positive side just after the main disconnect, so the voltage I'm seeing has gone through the controller.

The controller (Curtis 1231C) has been upgraded to a 650 amp. It runs great! Went over 10,000 miles yesterday, and raced a full size PU on the highway this morning! (He was one of those people who shift lanes constantly, though they never seem to do any better than the rest of us)

Maybe I do have nothing wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
If there was enough voltage across the motor to make it warm during charging, then your controller is messed up, and the motor would be trying to turn. This would be a very bad situation and highly unlikely, not to mention it being a very unsafe vehicle.
Yeah, that would be bad, I'll check it ASAP. Probably not happening though, just running a hot motor. Warp 9" on a 148V pack doing 65-70 down the highway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 · (Edited)
Yesterday, the power to the truck had popped the breaker at work, so it didn't charge most of its cycle. Got home and plugged it in, and now I can hear a loud hummimg coming from the FRONT of the truck, possibly just under and behind the firewall. Maybe thats where my short is?

Gonna pull it out and inspect. I'll drive the Gas guzzling Prius for now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 · (Edited)
Turned the charger on to see where the buzzing was coming from and heard it crackling instead. It was arching inside the motor!!! :eek:, controller off, truck off, just charger on. Disconnected this and that and finally got it to go away with the positive cable disconnected from the pack, but the chargers + still connected. Also had a short that was gone once the + HV was disconnected. Going to re-wire, might use 4/0 since I have some lying around. Got some work to do.

The pack short was close to 0V at the positive end, and 148V at the negative end to trucks ground. After disconnecting +HV, the V to truck ground was about 20V on either side.

Also, I was measuring the V going through the motor, got higher and higher till the arching, then dropped down and started going up again.
 

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How does the motor get connected if you are only charging (ie the ignition is off)?

I would suggest using 2 contactors (one +ve and one -ve) and the only thing that can turn-on the +ve contactor is your motor controller (ie ignition on, turned to start and after all self-tests are completed). The -ve contactor should get turned on if you the ignition is on or if the charger is connected (I use a switch on my fuel filler door where my electrical plug is). This way there is no chance of the motor getting power through the charger...
 

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How does the motor get connected if you are only charging (ie the ignition is off)?

I would suggest using 2 contactors (one +ve and one -ve) and the only thing that can turn-on the +ve contactor is your motor controller (ie ignition on, turned to start and after all self-tests are completed). The -ve contactor should get turned on if you the ignition is on or if the charger is connected (I use a switch on my fuel filler door where my electrical plug is). This way there is no chance of the motor getting power through the charger...
Very true. But that just bypasses the problem. Sort of like the penny under the fuse trick.

Duh!

There is a carbon build up in the motor or some other leakage from the HV circuit to vehicle chassis.

Your GFCI AC circuit breaker to the charger should have tripped.

Why didn't it? :eek:

Russ Kaufmann

RUSSCO
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
How does the motor get connected if you are only charging (ie the ignition is off)?

I would suggest using 2 contactors (one +ve and one -ve) and the only thing ...on my fuel filler door where my electrical plug is). This way there is no chance of the motor getting power through the charger...
The Positive cable was shorted to truck ground, somehow, the cable looks good, but then... and the negative side is connected to the controller and motor. The motors case is directly connected to the trucks ground.

Still, the + cable had a few chaffing areas, but nothing I'd call a short, or even close, but then it is HV.

A second contactor would work, though I'd spend $$$ and still have had the short. I'm going to route a 4/0 cable through PVC and seal it. I've been meaning to upgrade to 4/0 anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Very true. But that just bypasses the problem. Sort of like the penny under the fuse ...chassis.

Your GFCI AC circuit breaker to the charger should have tripped.

Why didn't it? :eek:

Russ Kaufmann

RUSSCO
I dont have a GFCI breaker, maybe the electrical inspector didn't know what he was doing? Plus, the amps draw was less than what would have caused the breaker to trip. Seems it did draw enough at work to trip thier breaker, and might have at my house, but I didn't let it run on long enough. It started as a crackling sound, and I could see the arching in the motor. After letting it go for a while, it turned into a humming sound. So I shut it off. My KWH went from my usual 10kwh to 20kwh the last charge.
 

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I would guess that the breaker at your work had GFCI protection built into the breaker and/or possibly arc fault protection. If you are on a breaker with built in GFCI you don't have the test and reset buttons on the outlet and you cannot reset it without going to the service panel.

You should install, or have installed, GFCI protection on any garage or outdoor outlet in your home. It is not standard on older homes. GFCI protection should also be installed in the kitchen and bathroom outlets. This is standard on newer homes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I would guess that the breaker at your work had GFCI protection built into the breaker and/or possibly arc fault protection. If you are on a breaker with built in GFCI you don't have the test and reset buttons on the outlet and you cannot reset it without going to the service panel.

You should install, or have installed, GFCI protection on any garage or outdoor outlet in your home. It is not standard on older homes. GFCI protection should also be installed in the kitchen and bathroom outlets. This is standard on newer homes.
Breaker at work is a normal breaker. They did have the GFCI installed with 110VAC outlets, till someone re-wired it for a 220VAC outlet cause the 110VAC outlet was pulling so many amps, it heated up the wire and breakers inside when doing our yearly thermal (whats that called?) scans.

My 220 in the garage was just installed and inspected last year. They never mentioned GFCI. But even then, I don't think it'd pop. The ground fault isn't to actual ground, its to the trucks ground, so the outlet only sees an increase in amps, not a fault. Eventually my C/B in the basement would have faulted.

I should probably get a GFCI outlet just for cheap insurance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Hey, any suggestions on insulating the HV cable. I had it just laying on the frame, tied down, was going to put it in PVC, but had idea to just put it in that pipe insulating foam and tie wrap it, slit facing downwards to let any water out. Very flexible, and insulating. Good or bad idea?
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Thought I had it, but I don't. I replaced the Negative HV cable going to the Curtis's B- and highly insulated it, and it still arc's across the motor.

I also checked the main pack to trucks frame and got -3.8VDC on the #46 neg post, -.52 on #46 pos post, and +2.8 on #45 pos post, and so on till the most pos post at battery #1 had almost full pack voltage!

When the charger is on, I get 103VDC at #46's Neg post to frame, and 50 VAC.

If I disconnect the B- from the Curtis, there is no arc'ing, but the battery pack still shows a short. Looks like in between batts 45 and 46, but nothing is connected other than MiniBMS with no end board connected (Still have a pack to frame short)

I'm going to try disconnecting the main charger and see what pack reads to frame, then disconnect DC/DC and re-check. DC/DC (IOTA) is always on, goes to full charger with ign key on.

I'm dead till I figure this out.
 
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