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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi,

Does anyone know if you can make different OEM parts work together? My understanding is that they do not talk the same CAN language, therefore you have to do something about it, but what?


So if I have parts from a salvage yard like this:
  • Old car with cool chassi.
  • Good Motor, like tesla or E-tron motor (or drive unit).
  • Nice batteries, like i3 or leaf batteries (packs or modules).
  • Inverter from somewhere, maybe attached to motor, maybe from another car.
  • Random BMS (Should match battery maker maybe?)
  • All the other cables, cooling, safety switches... etc.
  • VCU - This is my biggest area of non-understanding. How do you make everything work together??
How will I control everything without the software from each car?

Is it even possible?
 

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There's an old country song about stealing a Cadillac one piece at a time from the factory. Ends up using many adapters for everything including an adapter for the adapter.... This is what you are thinking of doing. Not going to stop you, but the trip will be long and arduous. Good mind exercise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
e-tron motor is big $$. Salvage yard pieces will cost you a lot more than a donor car. Have to ask WHY you would do this?
You can not buy and sell crashed vehicles in Sweden, it is illegal. Only insurance companies and authorized car shops can.
It is only legal to buy a car that has never been in an accident, which means that it is working fine, which also means it is expensive.

But parts on the other hand can be bought from the places that disassemble the crashed cars for pretty good prices.
 

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You can not buy and sell crashed vehicles in Sweden, it is illegal. Only insurance companies and authorized car shops can.
It is only legal to buy a car that has never been in an accident, which means that it is working fine, which also means it is expensive.

But parts on the other hand can be bought from the places that disassemble the crashed cars for pretty good prices.
This is true in most places in Canada and the US too, but the line is usually whether insurance thought the vehicle was not worth repairing, which is often if the repairs cost more than 2/3 or more than 3/4 of the current value of the vehicle. Then the vehicle is written off.

Once a vehicle has been written off in a crash, it will have a "salvage" brand on the title. You can get the "salvage" changed to a "rebuilt" brand or whatever that jurisdiction's equivalent, but this requires a very detailed inspection where just about everything has to be in perfect shape. You can't do that inspection yourself, you have to pay a licensed shop to do that and the government does random inspections to make sure they're being as critical as they're supposed to be. You can buy/sell/drive it as normal if it passes, but it will always have that brand on the title so that all future buyers are aware that it was rebuilt.

On a very serious crash, there's usually another brand for "do not repair", which means that this car will never again be a car. It can be parts, but sometimes parts can't even come from a car with this brand. Depends on local laws.

...

Sweden in my understanding actually has a fairly restrictive anti-DIY set of laws where just about everything has to be done by a licensed professional.
 

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Ok same deal here with certified aircraft, but that didn't stop me from rebuilding my 1950 Piper Pacer under the supervision of an AI.

So the project actually is obtaining a cheap roller then changing that vehicle from petrol to electric power using assorted available parts.
 
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