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I own and am generally quite happy with a 2013 plug in Prius. Unfortunately I can rarely make a trip which doesn't use gas. I sure would like 2x or 3x the EV range. I have looked inside the "battery" and convinced myself that replacing the cell modules with arrays of 18650 cells retaining the stock BMS etc. can result in significant range increase. Using for example the LG INR18650MJ1 which is rated at 3.3AH and 3C continuous discharge it would need 15P56s to support the 150 amp fuse current. The stock battery is composed of 4 cell modules, each is 14s with cooling air duct-ed between modules, I'd copy this general layout, including similar cooling. I've done a quick sketch in Sketchup using 18p blocks and it fits inside the stock enclosure, with lots of space for cooling and mounting. Has anyone done it?
 

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No one I am aware of has has successfully attempted to modify an already plug in Prius.
https://priuschat.com/threads/addin...an-double-plug-in-miles.114724/#axzz3BUzDo7yh

Volt, yes
Leaf, yes
I3, yes

I do know some folks who have done minor streamlining, light weighting and ecomodding to Prius models to gain efficiency


Where I would start is to see how similar the PIP battery system BMS/communication
Is to previous Gen II & III non plug ins

Toyota is in some ways very lazy and re uses the same IP for decades which means you may be able to use previous plug in conversions as a guideline or potentially modify prime parts for your pip.

From what I remember Toyo counts amp hours in and out so you would also need to address that even if you simply reuse their battery shell and replace the modules keeping their bms fully intact

Ah well

Good Luck and sorry I can’t help
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No one I am aware of has has successfully attempted to modify an already plug in Prius.
https://priuschat.com/threads/addin...an-double-plug-in-miles.114724/#axzz3BUzDo7yh

Volt, yes
Leaf, yes
I3, yes

I do know some folks who have done minor streamlining, light weighting and ecomodding to Prius models to gain efficiency


Where I would start is to see how similar the PIP battery system BMS/communication
Is to previous Gen II & III non plug ins

Toyota is in some ways very lazy and re uses the same IP for decades which means you may be able to use previous plug in conversions as a guideline or potentially modify prime parts for your pip.

From what I remember Toyo counts amp hours in and out so you would also need to address that even if you simply reuse their battery shell and replace the modules keeping their bms fully intact

Ah well

Good Luck and sorry I can’t help
Thank You for your response and interest! I was aware of the Plug In Supply "range extender". They AFIKT did install at least one. There is another PIP owner, in the UK, that has added a "range extender" ( made out of salvaged Tesla cells but not permanently mounted) more recently. In both cases the stock software was retained and it "accommodated" the larger packs with appropriately increased range estimates. I use "Torque" to monitor the PIP's operation and based on my observations of my PIP I can say: You are correct, the PIP uses "coulomb counting" to estimate range. However the stock software also uses pack voltage to stop charge @ about 4v/cell (222V) and switch from EV to HV @ about 3.5 volts/cell (196V) and appears to do these switches independent of state of charge. It appears that the stock PIP software "assigns" 85% capacity to the charge termination and 23% capacity to the EV to HV switch voltage levels then estimates EV range based on actual charge use and actual miles driven.

FWIW, I am one of those who have done " minor streamlining" (I run with the lower grill blocked).
 
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