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Most Efficient Motor

33798 Views 77 Replies 14 Participants Last post by  IamIan
I am curious if any one knows of any electric motor someone can buy that is more efficient?

Thanks.

CSIRO Motor ~98% Efficiency
http://www.csiro.au/solutions/psz7.html

which is compatible with:
Wavesculptor20 Controller ~99% Efficiency.
http://www.tritium.com.au/products/TRI50/index.html

( ~97% Combined Efficiency )

I understand the top end of efficiency like any top end of performance comes at a price premium ... so it is understood from the beginning to be expensive beyond being practical ... I was just curious if anyone knows of better.

I also understand that efficiency is not a set thing and does change based on a variety of factors , RPM , Voltage, Current, Load, Temperature, etc... But even looking at some of the documents for these two ... it still looks like the combination would be hard to beat for efficiency... even as a net over all operating efficiency.

And although expensive , they are commercially available to buy right now today ... I have little doubt there are some hypothetical motors and controller that could be better ... but I was more curious about if there is anything actually available that is more efficient??

If you are aware of something better ( more efficient ) ... please post ... thanks.
:D
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Induction motors may be more effcient when operating in deep weakening region. Reason - their excitation current decreases, and for PMACs' counterexcitation current increases when going deeper into weakening.
 

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Power density appears to be very misunderstood concept on this forum in electrical rotating machines since it relies on the operating speed range. Torque density is more appropriate.
samborambo: I'm talking about 1:1 comparison of induction and synchronous motors, both having the same stator and operational speed. For this case, power density ~ torque density. By freeing the stator from the need of providing excitation to the rotor, one can obtain significantly higher torque.

Pull out torque for induction machines is usually only apparent when driven from V/Hz controllers or straight online utility frequency.
By "pullout torque limit" I meant limited span of constant power region, due to falloff of pullout torque. For synchronous machines, this region is somewhat extended.
 
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