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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm having nothing but headaches with my 2011 Th!nk City and I'm ready to gut the entire vehicle and replace everything with a much more simple aftermarket DIY kit. The Th!nk only made 44hp with it's current weight so I don't think it would be TOO difficult to find a motor that's capable of 50kw+. I'm planning to use the LG A7 60V battery modules I've already purchased for the build as they'll be able to throw out a lot more amps than the stock 370v Th!nk pack. The only piece I'm looking to retain is the factory differential, if possible.

I'm not interested in trying to swap in another 360-400v motor in the vehicle because I don't think it'll fit without major fabrication and a ton of wiring/electrical/software issues.

I was really hoping the HyPer9 120v kit would fit but the motor is too long to mount to the factory gear reduction.

Can anyone point me in the direction of a suitable 48-62V motor and controller that would be strong enough to power my little dinky hatch?
 

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So you want to run a motor at 50 volts and 1,000 amps? That's going to be a huge motor and expensive controller. I understand the difficulty of finding a modern 360 V EV motor which is physically small enough and adapting it to mount to the existing transaxle, but if that can't be found something at ~120 V and 400 A seems like a more likely combination.
 

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And I would be fine with that if there was something that would fit without requiring me to cut the frame rails or fabricate new mounts and shorten/lengthen cv axles. Any suggestions? I have about 12" of space from the face of the differential to the frame rail. The HyPer9 120v I wanted to use is 13.75". Do you know of any other, more compact, 120v motors and controllers I could slot in place?

So you want to run a motor at 50 volts and 1,000 amps? That's going to be a huge motor and expensive controller. I understand the difficulty of finding a modern 360 V EV motor which is physically small enough and adapting it to mount to the existing transaxle, but if that can't be found something at ~120 V and 400 A seems like a more likely combination.
 

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And I would be fine with that if there was something that would fit without requiring me to cut the frame rails or fabricate new mounts and shorten/lengthen cv axles. Any suggestions? I have about 12" of space from the face of the differential to the frame rail. The HyPer9 120v I wanted to use is 13.75". Do you know of any other, more compact, 120v motors and controllers I could slot in place?
That is tough. Typical industrial vehicle motors used in EV conversions ("forklift" motors) are about the length of that HyPer9 (not just by coincidence) if they are powerful enough for a car. Motors for lighter vehicles (e.g. golf cars) are smaller (in every dimension), but not likely strong enough (even if they ran at a high enough voltage to keep the current reasonable).

There are the various "pancake" motors (typically axial flux designs, such as those from Emrax and YASA) which are short, but they are also expensive and likely to need more voltage for sufficient power over a good range of speed.

The Meiden S61 motor used at the front of Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is quite short (150 mm according to a reseller, but more length would be needed for a housing adapter and shaft coupler), and is rated for 30 kW continuous or 60 kW peak, but it need to turn at high speed and get up to 300 volts to make that power. Using only the lower half of its speed range might work.
 

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It would be helpful to know where your headaches specifically come from:
What I have understood is, the Th!nk A306 suffers from battery, BMS and cotroller (PCU) issues. So I would try to replace these components only.
Even if the motor should be affected, a repair might make sense (new bearings, rewind coils, replace sensors).
I guess it is easier to find an inverter meeting the specifications of the existing motor than a low-voltage motor with 50kW.
Markus
 
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