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Discussion Starter #1
Assuming I leave the gearbox in the 1940's car I'm thinking of electrifying, I don't need a motor that's reversible. how much simpler does this make motor choice ? Is it true that sticking DC will make my life simpler on a budget project with a low powered car. AC seems to present extra costs ...for what advantage?
 

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Both AC and DC motors are reversible in direction - it depends on the controller used to do that, not the motor itself (though most DC controllers don't reverse)

Standard doctrine from what I've read round here on motors is;

DC: Cheaper, Unsophisticated power, cheaper controllers, Old tech. Brushes wear and need replacing periodically. No Regen & reverse uncommon.

AC: More expensive, more advanced controllers (expensive, more features). Regen braking (not for range really, but it's a nice-to-have). New manufactured AC motors are expensive and weak - Salvaged motors from OEM electric cars are usually less expensive and far more powerful. All motor advancements in tech are being made on AC motors now - OEM EV motors and controllers are the best way to go if budget's no object.
 

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Both AC and DC motors are reversible in direction - it depends on the controller used to do that, not the motor itself (though most DC controllers don't reverse)

Standard doctrine from what I've read round here on motors is;

DC: Cheaper, Unsophisticated power, cheaper controllers, Old tech. Brushes wear and need replacing periodically. No Regen & reverse uncommon.

AC: More expensive, more advanced controllers (expensive, more features). Regen braking (not for range really, but it's a nice-to-have). New manufactured AC motors are expensive and weak - Salvaged motors from OEM electric cars are usually less expensive and far more powerful. All motor advancements in tech are being made on AC motors now - OEM EV motors and controllers are the best way to go if budget's no object.


Also, motor braking might be an essential feature, if you drive around mountains. Or have really, really good brakes.


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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I have no real need for motor braking. Nor do I need much range or speed. The car is quite light ( probably less than a tonne without it's original engine ) If I leave the gearbox in...giving me 'mechanical ' reverse, then that simplifies the controller choice presumably...So is my best bet a simple DC motor? I'm seeing 3 phase motors...surely single phase is easier?
 

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So is my best bet a simple DC motor?
For a low-budget, low-effort build, yep.

Used forklift motors for free-$200 are the usual plan.

I'm seeing 3 phase motors...surely single phase is easier?
Nope. Single phase is a bit of a hack, motor-wise. You have to fake a second phase just to get it rotate.

3 phase is what everything is.

I don't know if I've ever even seen a 1ph EV conversion.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for that ...I'm not clear on how that works coming from a battery supply. Can you point to anywhere where's circuit diagrams of how a 3p DC motor wires up to it's batteries?
 

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For a low-budget, low-effort build, yep.

Used forklift motors for free-$200 are the usual plan.



Nope. Single phase is a bit of a hack, motor-wise. You have to fake a second phase just to get it rotate.

3 phase is what everything is.

I don't know if I've ever even seen a 1ph EV conversion.
No such thing as ‘phase’ with DC.

AC requires 3 phase, or some form of starter to get it to turn if single phase.
 

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There are still 2 phases in a DC motor, but the commutation is mechanical rather than electronic.
 
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