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I am hoping to mount a full Model 3 rear suspension in place of the current unpowered rear suspension on my FWD 2016 Ford Escape SEL to create a "performance" plug-in hybrid. I have several engineering challenges in front of me, but the first is simply confirming it will in fact fit without completely rebuilding the rear unibody. Does anyone have access to detailed measurements, or even better a web viewable CAD diagram that includes the full rear suspension with the motor installed?

It looks like it will fit if I remove the spare tire well (run flats in my future?) and the rear muffler. Surprisingly, the Escape actually has two mufflers, one in the driveshaft tunnel area, and a second at the rear that divides the single exhaust pipe from the forward muffler into the twin exhaust tips exiting the rear bumper. I would need a custom exhaust to clear the new Model 3 suspension setup, but that is much easier and cheaper to fabricate than mounting the new suspension.

My next step is to figure out how to control the Model 3 motor/inverter to run it in a hybrid mode. I'm keeping the ICE drivetrain which simplifies the install and allows me to retain all the stock features (specifically AC in southern AZ!) without needing a DC-DC converter or reconfiguring the dash. I will need a parallel way to control both the IC engine and the electric motor for hybrid operations (say up to 60 MPH), then still allow for regen braking when the electric motor is not being used after the vehicle is up to speed. The other issue is how things will function when the battery pack SoC is low enough so that the electric motor is not available below 60 MPH. Hopefully those functions are available via an aftermarket motor controller from one of the EV conversion specialists...

Thanks in advance,
Shack
 

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Model 3 complete rear assemblies (drive unit plus suspension on subframe) are starting to appear in projects. One that I noticed recently is SuperfastMatt's Jaguar Mk V: Tesla Powered Jag

He used CAD models.
 

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It looks like it will fit if I remove the spare tire well (run flats in my future?)
Run-flats are generally horrible tires - heavy, expensive, poor ride and handling. A practical alternative is to just carry an air pump and be prepared to call a roadside assistance service.

Surprisingly, the Escape actually has two mufflers, one in the driveshaft tunnel area, and a second at the rear that divides the single exhaust pipe from the forward muffler into the twin exhaust tips exiting the rear bumper.
That's actually common. :)
 
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