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Just collecting ideas here. Curious the cost involved with a conversion. Basic parts cost that is. The majority of the build will be done by me. I feel like with a body on frame truck it may be pretty easy to locate the batteries between the body and frame and between the frame rails. I could be way off. though.

I was inspired by the cybertruck. I really like the idea of having an EV truck. However I dont want the cybertruck.

Practically speaking, trying to find out if this is even worth the swap or not.

Some questions

1. total parts costs
2. Total battery capacity to get an average 500 miles of range. Is it possible even with current technology
3. Can the batteries be placed between the frame rails and between the frame and body.
4. Can it be made to be water proof.
5. Can you implement fast charging.

I didnt put these questions here to get everyone to answer, more so just to introduce myself and explain my intentions.

Although if you want to answer any be my guest it'll save me some initial research.
 

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Welcome :) Please don't feel like my answer is hostile - I'm just trying to realign your expectations with what's possible. I'm not hugely experienced around here but hopefully my answers can be starting points for your own research...

Parts cost:
The main issue here is your battery size. If you'd said you wanted 100-150mi of range, there would be multiple options to keep to a decent budget. While the cost of batteries has been falling for years, it will still cost you over £100/kWh (convert to dollars if you like :D). That means your battery alone (without any other parts) will probably be at a super-optimistic minimum £20k. Probably a lot more. I can't imagine a 500mi pickup truck costing much less than £30-40k to convert once you're done... This can be a LOT lower if you scale down the battery requirements.

Range & Battery capacity:
If you actually need a 500-mile range truck - an EV is not currently the optimal technology... You'll need a 200kWh battery pack capacity (assuming 400Wh/mile consumption - which is a highly optimistic figure for a heavy, blocky pickup truck...)

Why you need a 500mi range in a pickup truck is a question for another time. If you'd said 100-150mi, that's something that's much more feasible. Another factor that makes a huge difference is speed - 100mi at highway speeds will require a lot more battery capacity than 100mi at 25mph.

Fitting 200kWh of batteries into an existing non-purpose built EV without basically filling the truck bed. Not mentioning the weight - Tesla's 100kWh packs total to around 500kg, so you'd be adding a literal tonne of batteries to the vehicle.

Remember that the paradigm for fuelling a car is nothing like that of charging an EV. If you drive 60 miles in a given day, you park it up and plug it in and refill what you used. If you have a conventional ICE vehicle avaliable to you to do the small quantity of journeys that might not be workable on a DIY EV, then do you need an EV that can do all of those?

Converting a pickup truck is not impossible, nor does it have to cost the earth - but if you want to practically do it, you either need a much larger budget than you'd thought you would (i.e. you might as well buy a Rivian/Cybertruck) or you need to reset your expectations (mostly about range - 500mi is extremely long for any EV using existing battery tech.)

Water-proofing:
Most individual parts needed for a conversion can be ordered in water-resistant enclosures, but this is largely up to your build choices. How water resistant do you mean? Driving around in the rain & occasionally fording a stream is very different from anchoring it to a beach and letting the tide roll in.

Fast Charging:
On most EVs, "slow" or AC charging is done by an on-board battery charger that takes mains AC and converts to the high-voltage DC the battery needs. Fast charging is done by large stationary DC power supplies that output HVDC.

AC charging typically requires single-phase (or 3-phase) 230V power to be installed. Typical chargers operate at 32A, which at 230VAC, will give you around 7kW of power. You triple this if you use a 3-phase 32A charger (though this requires 3-phase power to be installed where you want to charge)

Worth researching, but as far as I've read - there's no existing DIY implementation using CCS charging stations. CHAdeMO is easier, but still a bit fiddly to implement. You have to be a bit careful, as your vehicle needs to instruct the off-board power supply what voltage and current to supply, and these communication standards all have their quirks.

DC Fast Charging speed will vary depending on your vehicle and the charging stations, but is typically somewhere from 50-350kW. To charge at high rates, you need careful thermal management of the battery pack.

Hope this helps - I don't think I'm fundamentally wrong anywhere, but you should verify any claims I made with your own research, especially as things might be different in your locale to where I am (UK).

Regards,
Nick
 

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3. Can the batteries be placed between the frame rails and between the frame and body.
Yes, if the motor and a shaft from the motor to the rear axle are not in the way... and even then, the 200 kWh or more that you need probably won't fit.

There have been many pickup truck conversions, but none with that sort of range. There are several battery-electric pickup trucks proposed for production, but none have been built and all use a specific structure to accommodate a larger battery pack than would fit between typical pickup frame rails.

A couple of decades ago Ford built Ranger EVs, with a battery pack that stretched from the front axle to nearly the rear axle, filling all of the space available where the engine, transmission, fuel tank, and exhaust system were normally located. The frame and battery pack are shown in post #22 of the discussion Factory Ford Ranger EV in this forum.

To make it work, Ford built a special version of the Ranger frame with crossmembers designed to arch up over the top of the pack instead of the usual position straight between the frame rails. To make a stock frame work, the battery would need to be split up into multiple packs to fit the spaces between crossmembers... a custom frame would probably be easier for the extreme battery capacity that is being considered here.
 

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If you actually need a 500-mile range truck - an EV is not currently the optimal technology... You'll need a 200kWh battery pack capacity (assuming 400Wh/mile consumption - which is a highly optimistic figure for a heavy, blocky pickup truck...)
That is sound reasoning. For comparison, the electric pickup proposal with the most development work done and the best corporate support is from Rivian, which predicts a 400 mile range with 180 kWh of battery (450 Wh/mile). Their base version will have only 105 kWh battery capacityWith their state-of-the-art technology and optimized design they would need more than 225 kWh of battery capacity for 500 mile range... and that's probably with no cargo and certainly not towing anything.
 

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Rivian, which predicts a 400 mile range with 180 kWh of battery (450 Wh/mile).
At highway speeds?

Just the rolling resistance is close to 450 Wh/mile.

I know companies usually quote range as a mixture of city/highway, but, no one is driving 400 miles in mixed circumstances. The only time you're using the upper edge of the range is highway driving for the majority. 400 miles at highway speeds is already 7 hours of highway driving in a day. If you spend half your time at 30mph, there almost aren't enough hours in the day to say what your range would be.

4. Can it be made to be water proof.
Reasonably, if not perfectly.

Teslas, even though they use the skateboard style battery packs, are not waterproof. They're designed so that water doesn't easily splash into them, but for any water that does to be able to get back out. There's channels everywhere.

...

I'm not sure what the OP is envisioning. He's going to drive 4 hours out of town to a mud pit, go offroading in his obesely heavy vehicle, and then turn around and drive 4 hours home?

Every day? Or just occasionally?

Seems like a worst possible choice for an EV.

I wonder if people are just playing fantasy games sometimes when they come here. Like, is this a "I wonder if..." or is this a serious question about something someone's going to be spending tens of thousands of dollars on?

Both are fine, but, sometimes I feel like, someone wants to help plan or troubleshoot a build that they have no intention of building, so I'm putting effort in problem-solving something they're barely going to read.
 

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... Rivian, which predicts a 400 mile range with 180 kWh of battery (450 Wh/mile).
At highway speeds?
Who knows? We're talking about marketing claims which may not correspond to test results, which are based on various operating conditions.

Just the rolling resistance is close to 450 Wh/mile.
That seems unlikely. Do you mean rolling resistance plus aero drag at some speed? If rolling resistance for a pickup this size is 450 Wh/mile, then EVs which are half the weight (so half the rolling drag) must have nearly zero aero drag to make their consumption.

I know companies usually quote range as a mixture of city/highway, but, no one is driving 400 miles in mixed circumstances. The only time you're using the upper edge of the range is highway driving for the majority. 400 miles at highway speeds is already 7 hours of highway driving in a day. If you spend half your time at 30mph, there almost aren't enough hours in the day to say what your range would be.
It doesn't matter when you are using the range. A driver certainly can use the full range of their energy supply (whether it is battery charge, or fuel from a tank) in urban conditions, although it may take several days. There is no elapsed time period in range capabilities.
 

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It doesn't matter when you are using the range. A driver certainly can use the full range of their energy supply (whether it is battery charge, or fuel from a tank) in urban conditions, although it may take several days. There is no elapsed time period in range capabilities.
True, though it's a reasonable assumption that Matt made, given that a majority of EV drivers will plug in at home - overnight for example.

If I had to drive 500 miles between long stops (e.g. overnight) on a fairly regular basis, I'd certainly not want to do that distance in an older pickup truck...
 

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... it's a reasonable assumption that Matt made, given that a majority of EV drivers will plug in at home - overnight for example.
True, but the key - as is often the case - is to properly define the requirements. Given that the intended vehicle is a pickup truck, the range may be required to take a load (perhaps a camper or travel trailer) to a destination and return... possibly days later, and possibly without charging facilities at the destination. Again, range is the distance which can be travelled on a charge, regardless of how long that takes, even though typically EVs are charged daily.

If I had to drive 500 miles between long stops (e.g. overnight) on a fairly regular basis, I'd certainly not want to do that distance in an older pickup truck...
Perhaps not, but the most popular choice for long-distance travel by owners of travel trailers is full-size pickup trucks, and they haven't changed much (other than the extent of electronic toys) in decades. On the other extreme, commuting to work in an urban environment - the last place I would want to drive a large pickup - a very popular vehicle choice here is... large pickups. I certainly wouldn't make any assumptions about the type of use based on the vehicle being a pickup.
 
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