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Hi, my name's Andy, I live in Germany with my family and have been dreaming for some time to get an electric vehicle.
Right now I am driving a 20 year old Mercedes E200 that is converted to LPG, but I am not really driving it a lot, as I try to use my electric bike wherever possible (e.g. to commute to work).

I am thinking of maybe getting a W124 Mercedes (the predecessor of my current vehicle, with less electronics) and converting it with the help of a German car conversion company called Lorey machinery.

The challenge is that in order to get a modified car registered in Germany, we have some very strict laws for that and there are difficult - hence expensive - tests of electric interference required. The company in question is ready to help with that. They basically provide kits consisting of an engine, an adapter plate that links the engine to the original gearbox, and a set of LiFePo batteries (they don't do LiIon), and they only convert vehicles built before 2002.

 

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Welcome!

The famous W124 has been the target of a few conversions, even in this forum.

Just a small tip: in English, "engine" is normally used only for fuel-burning engines, not electric motors. Unfortunately some translation programs don't realize this, and it occasionally causes confusion. It's particularly frustrating because in German an electric motor is called a "motor".

And another bit of terminology which is a very common error (unrelated to translation between languages): LiFePO4 and lithium-ion are not different things - LiFePO4 (also known as LFP) is one of several lithium-ion (or "Li-ion") battery electrode material combinations or "chemistries".
 

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Yes technically lithium = LI = li-ion are synonyms and designate the whole "umbrella" of dozens if related chemistries, including the two lower-voltage and less energy dense LTO and LFP.

However in the common parlance many use-case sectors "li-ion" is used to just mean the higher-density chemistries at nominal 3.6-3.7Vpc, those used most often for propulsion use cases these days, as opposed to LTO and LFP.

Yes this latter usage is confusing and ambiguous, but unfortunately it seems more common for "li-ion" than the former broader meaning.

So generally I avoid the term, use LI or "lithium chemistries" for the umbrella meaning

use LFP or LTO specifically

and "higher-density chemistries at nominal 3.6-3.7Vpc" for the rest like NMC NCA LMO LCO etc ad infinitum.
 
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