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I have a 1996 48V Club Car Carryall that requires (6) 8-volt batteries that will need upgrading soon. What is the down-fall to utilizing (4) 12-volt batteries instead? Also, I have heard of using hybrid electric car battery packs in these types of vehicles, is it a complicated swap? Which pack would be the "best" retrofit option for my cart? Thanks in advance.
 

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If they fit, 8*6V best value.

Duracell (Deka) flooded GC from Sam's Club or Batteries+ are very good value. Trojan T-105 a little better if close in price, RE variant much better but pricey. U.S. Battery, Crown, Superior also very good.

12V rarely as robust or long-lived.

Going for a used EV pack would be lighter but lots more expensive installation, IMO much riskier.
 

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Hi
Ignore John - he is into house systems where a few extra tons are not a problem and he seems to think that everybody should buy new all of the time - must have shares in battery manufacturers

A single Volt 2Kwhr module would probably give more range than your Leads - should cost somewhere around $400
 

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Unless you want to change lead acid batteries every 3 years, and carry 4x the weight around, then go with GM Volt used cells, and get a lot more range.

You would need a 48V CCCV 12s charger.

Duncan, is the module 12s? Does it have balancing, or not needed?
 

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The Volt 2Kwhr module is 12S3P - but you are only worried about the 12S

As far as balancing is concerned the pack comes with individual balancing modules - but using them is too complex for me!

I use a "Batt Bridge" - an incredibly simple circuit that tells me if I am out of balance
http://www.evdl.org/pages/battbridge.html

And I do checks at the individual cell level with a Celllog8 - they are about $20 and they can be modified to plug straight into the BMS cables on the Volt modules

So far every cell (I'm using 84S 3P) has been within 0.014v - and I am kind of abusing them a touch!

I use mine between 3.5v and 4.05v - you do need the right voltage for the specific chemistry!

With my old Headway pack I needed to track Ah - in and out -
With the Volt cells battery voltage is a good measure of charge
 

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I have a 1996 48V Club Car Carryall that requires (6) 8-volt batteries that will need upgrading soon. What is the down-fall to utilizing (4) 12-volt batteries instead? Also, I have heard of using hybrid electric car battery packs in these types of vehicles, is it a complicated swap? Which pack would be the "best" retrofit option for my cart? Thanks in advance.

6 x 8volt vs 4 x 12volt, if the amp/hr rating is the same then they would perform about the same also total weight of the pack, 12volt vs 8volt.

I would buy new lead acid as apposed to used, if you take care of them they will last yrs, I have 2 - 36volt battery packs 5 and 6yrs old that are in good shape with lots of range in them.

The added weight of a lead acid pack is a benefit to a golf cart, traction and stability, it's not a road going car where extra weight hurts performance

Going to a used hybrid car pack, where do you buy them, how do you know if there still good and then you need a charger for them. ???
Not saying this is a bad thing but if you don't know then it could be risky, expensive if you make a mistake.
I would love to have lithium pack in my electric GE tractors but ??? I don't know enough to find and setup a used pack properly.
IMO for certain vehicles lead is a good choice.
 

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Very few 12V are available as robust as lower voltages, as well designed for deep cycling.

Yes new lead is best value where weight is not a problem.

I stand by the Deka / Duracell recommendation above, as well as the pricier ones, all built for that specific purpose and a no-brainer drop in.

Go talk to the cart guy at any large golf course near you.
 

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If weight is not a problem for a golf cart, I would go for range. Why not have 3 or 4x the range? Which means used Volt li-ion modules (or six or seven Leaf sardine cans). Many shops are selling used modules. A 48V charger for li-ion is as little as $50. And as Duncan says, you don't need round-the-clock balancing if you occasionally monitor the state of health of the cells.
 

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Having bought (@$1500/set), several sets of 8 volt Trojan DC cells for a professionally maintained industrial vehicle, i can attest that in daily use , correctly charged etc, they never lasted more than 18 months...often much less.
The lease contract on those devices specifically stated the user is responsible for battery costs !....i wonder why ?
 

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6 x 8volt vs 4 x 12volt, if the amp/hr rating is the same then they would perform about the same also total weight of the pack, 12volt vs 8volt.
Yes, but common lead-acid deep-cycle batteries are about the same weight per battery, at the limit of what one person can reasonably handle. The different voltages just exist to break the mass of the whole battery set into suitable chunks.

In golf cars, the batteries are normally in series. A common standard setup is six 8-volt batteries. The higher-capacity option is eight 6-volt batteries. No one uses 12-volt batteries, because the capacity of four of them (of a reasonable size each) is just not enough.

Some Trojan examples, of comparable construction (not comparing a cheap 12 volt starting battery to an industrial-grade deep-cycle battery):
  • 6V: T-125 240 Ah, 66 lb (30 kg), so a set of eight is 240 Ah @ 48 V in 528 lb (240 kg)
  • 8V: T-875 170 Ah, 63 lb (29 kg), so a set of six is 170 Ah @ 48 V in 378 lb (174 kg)
  • 12V: T-1275 150 Ah, 85 lb (39 kg), so a set of four is 150 Ah @ 48 V in 340 lb (156 kg)
Similar boxes, split into different numbers of cells to change the size of the total 48V set.


So, you decide on your battery chemistry and construction, your total capacity, and how big a box you want to lift... and you have your battery ("module" in EV terms) voltage and capacity.

If you're happy with lead-acid, and only need two-thirds of the capacity of the current six X 8V configuration, you can use four X 12V (of something like the size above).
If you want more capacity, you can use really big and really hard to manage 12 volt batteries;
e.g. J185P-AC, 205 Ah, 114 lb (52 kg) each, or 205 Ah @ 48 V in 456 lb (208 kg)
 

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12V: T-1275 150 Ah, 85 lb (39 kg), so a set of four is 150 Ah @ 48 V in 340 lb (156 kg)
Problem isn't just weight.

The vendors design most 12V to not last nearly as long as the 6V units, often **half** the rated cycles for a given cycling depth.

And they're more expensive per AH.

For price and performance, stick to 6v.
 

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The vendors design most 12V to not last nearly as long as the 6V units, often **half** the rated cycles for a given cycling depth.
Stereotypes don't help; facts do. The 12 volt battery which I used as an example (Trojan's T-1275) is rated for the same cycle life (1,200 cycles @ 50% DOD) as the 6 volt models in the same product line (Signature Line). That makes sense, since it is built the same way.

Pricing is another matter - that has nothing to battery technology and much to do with supply and demand.
 

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Problem isn't just weight.
Weight isn't a problem with the voltage selection, either. The values which I quoted clearly show that the total capacity is proportional to the total weight - regardless of the voltage per battery (which means the number of cells per battery box) - within the same product line (so comparable construction).
 

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Yes sorry you're completely right, about that model, sorry.

There are others, exceptions that prove the rule.

And whatever the cause of price differences, the GC 6v I spec'd above can't be beat for value.
 
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