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Gentlemen,

This is a quick newbie consult about the HVH250-115 motors.

I am just getting in touch with these units for the first time and I wonder if you could kindly address me on the right track of understanding about their configuration choices:

Rated voltage: all the units I have seen on the web state 700V on their tags (most, if not all of them, old Remy units), and the curves family found in the specs sheets also step up to 700V. Should I understand that,

1) The entire family is wound for 700V as its rated voltage (no matter if D or S) and the different curves just describe the performance of the motor for this rated voltage and a few other lower discrete values (350, 500 and 600V on new BorgWarner literature; 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600V on Remy’s)?

Or,

2) Should I expect units wound for any of those values as a rated voltage?


Thanks
 

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I am also considering this motor. The double winding preferred is about the right performance for me, it's the 700V unit.

BergWarner also has some great boxes that bolt on directly.

Anybody with experience with this motor and the associated gear box?

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Via Motors used them in their hybrid pickups and vans under the VTrux trademark around 2012 iirc. Company was led by Bob Lutz formerly of GM and daddy of the Chevy Volt.

The HVH250-90 cartridge appears to be used in the Ford Mustang Mach-E.

The problem is that Model 3/Y have become such jellybeans it's really tough to justify the spend, especially considering a Tesla DU has the inverter, whereas the HVH needs one in addition to the cost of the motor and that offset gearbox.

Leaf motors are a lot cheaper. There's also almost no community support for them...in fact, I'm not aware of anybody using them.

It's pretty much become a boat anchor over the past couple of years, lol.
 

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Thanks remey_martian, great data. I've been learning a lot over the past few weeks. But vacation is over, gotta work again. I really like the HVH motors, but haven't done the pricing yet. We'll see.

The Ford ecrate motor is really geared up, 9.08:1 IIRC. The price is rig, but if you hook that up to a differential, you have tremendous low end torque, but not very fast.

Thoughts on the idea behind the high ratio? Are they somehow connected directly to the wheels or a different differential?

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The axles come right out of that drive unit. That ratio is pretty nominal for a 10k motor to wheel speed. It goes in place of a diff
Alright, thanks. You put on independent suspensions and tie directly to that. That's really what I'd like, but have new research to do to figure out how to get that into my truck. If I have to cut into the bed, no good.

Seems like something for the next vacation.

Mark

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Chevrolet Silverado has independent front suspension. Do what they did on the Pontiac Fiero and run the inner tie rods to a fixed point on the frame after you move it to the back.
Hi Remy, I had some a quick death before this and thought all hope was lost for direct connect.

This is intriguing, but after an hour of searching, I can't find this reference. Can you provide a pointer so I can see what they did?

Nothing is a given, considering this truck is a straight frame.

Thanks,
Mark

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It's a common trick on mid engined cars (I believe MR2 did it as well). Slide the front wheel drive straight back, tie the inner tie rod to the frame using a long rod so it doesn't bump steer. Easiest to crawl under one that's up for sale and look.
 

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This is intriguing, but after an hour of searching, I can't find this reference. Can you provide a pointer so I can see what they did?
It's just a general approach: if using a suspension at the rear which was designed for the front, one issue is that there is no steering rack... so just use links like the steering tie rods, but anchor them to fixed points on the vehicle structure instead of to the ends of a steering rack.

Also, don't take this "just use front suspension in the rear" too literally - the geometry won't be right if the suspension was designed with anti-dive (as a front suspension usually is) unless some link mount positions are adjusted.
 

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It's a common trick on mid engined cars (I believe MR2 did it as well). Slide the front wheel drive straight back, tie the inner tie rod to the frame using a long rod so it doesn't bump steer. Easiest to crawl under one that's up for sale and look.
To minimize bump steer, you need the right length, not just the longest length. In most designs, that means a track (tie) rod similar in length to the control arms.

Dealerships are great reference sources. I like the vehicles inside the showroom - clean and smooth floors are easier on the knees than parking lots. :)
 

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Sigh, there's no way that will work without installing a tub. The '52 is straight frame in the rear with springs mounting on the outer sides of the frame to keep the bed lower.

The more I look at it, the more I realize it's going to be full differential in the rear.

I've got the bug again about four wheel drive. Maybe I can do this or a 4wd front differential with either transfer case (ie np205) or two motors. Or I give up and live with two wheel drive.

Thanks for the help!

Mark

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The more I look at it, the more I realize it's going to be full differential in the rear.
What do you mean by "full differential"?
The original live axle in the truck.
That's a reasonable guess, but since "full differential" doesn't really mean anything at all, my question for 52International remains.

The big thing with hubs on each end and a differential in the middle is a live beam axle (yes, routinely just called a "live axle").
 
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