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What would the electricity requirement to propel a 80,000 pound vehicle up a 5% grade for 5 miles?

I've heard gas turbines become less efficient the larger they get

I just have serious doubts 400 KW would be enough to do the job of driving the vehicle up a mountain while weighing 80,000 pounds
 

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What would the electricity requirement to propel a 80,000 pound vehicle up a 5% grade for 5 miles?

I've heard gas turbines become less efficient the larger they get

I just have serious doubts 400 KW would be enough to do the job of driving the vehicle up a mountain while weighing 80,000 pounds
I can't give you any of the numbers. But I can assure you that this vehicle was sized for the job.

Keep in mind that hills don't last forever. So the truck can draw significantly more than 400kW when going up a hill, due to the 315kWh battery. The whole point of a series hybrid is that the range extender must cover only the average load. 400kW is enough for that.
 

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Gas turbines become MORE efficient as they get larger
and 400Kw is 533Hp -
Some (only a few) of today's truck engines exceed 600hp - BUT they only achieve that power at maximum rpm
Using an electric drive this truck would have 400Kw available all of time + being able to pull from the battery
 

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Gas turbines become MORE efficient as they get larger
and 400Kw is 533Hp -
Some (only a few) of today's truck engines exceed 600hp - BUT they only achieve that power at maximum rpm
Using an electric drive this truck would have 400Kw available all of time + being able to pull from the battery
Exactly. The peak power of the truck is actually 1.5 Megawatts. With the turbine running, the battery can supply the other 1.1Megawatts. Of course as you drive this way, the battery SOC starts to drop. But there isn't a hill in the country long enough to deplete the batteries. And then of course you regen down the other side. With 80,000 lbs, regen starts to be a lot more significant.
 

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I don't think the trucking industry is aware of the big changes that are coming soon. Drivetrain technology for heavy trucks have been mostly stagnant for decades (more so than cars). I guess it is a consequence of an industry with only a few competitors (Cummings, CAT, International, Detroit, etc.) and very conservative customers. Brand loyalty is fierce in trucking, almost religious.

In the end, fleets demand efficiency. The manufacturer that brings a platform to market that delivers better performance with significant efficiency gains than current trucks will have a winner. We know it works, but convincing this industry is the hard part.
 

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Nikola One in Motion - "Behold, the 1,000 HP, zero emission Nikola One semi-truck in motion. Get ready for the pre-production units to hit fleets next year in 2019 for testing. The Nikola hydrogen electric trucks will take on any semi-truck and outperform them in every category; weight, acceleration, stopping, safety and features - all with a 500-1,000 mile range!"

 

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I question the wisdom of using a fuel cell. The PEM in a typical stack undergoes severe degradation for such an expensive part. Also, the overall efficiency of the H2 cycle is quite low compared to just using an NG gas turbine like Capstone.

At least with NG, you are up running right away with a pervasive infrastructure. No need to risk success on a technology that has yet to prove viable in truck transport. When the batteries get better (and they will quickly) you just ditch the turbine for an ideal all battery solution.

H2 seems like a greenwashing gimmick cooked up by extraction industry to forestall pure BEV and provide a market for soon-to-be stranded assets.

I get the idea that it is more profitable to sell a device that forces the user to buy proprietary "fuel" forever. However, I think the fleets are wise to this trap.
 

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Nikola One in Motion - "Behold, the 1,000 HP, zero emission Nikola One semi-truck in motion. Get ready for the pre-production units to hit fleets next year in 2019 for testing. The Nikola hydrogen electric trucks will take on any semi-truck and outperform them in every category; weight, acceleration, stopping, safety and features - all with a 500-1,000 mile range!"

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I found it interesting that there is no real audio - just added music. Does the gear whine sound that bad?

More importantly, the truck is doing nothing that requires a working fuel cell, or even a large battery. It certainly isn't demonstrating 1,000 horsepower, or high performance in hauling weight, accelerating, or stopping. As far as I'm concerned, this is still a marketing prop - not a viable development mule, let alone anything close to production.

To be fair to Nikola Motor, the truck by the other company which has ripped off Nikola Tesla's name has not demonstrated high performance, either. ;)
 

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Nikola One in Motion - "Behold, the 1,000 HP, zero emission Nikola One semi-truck in motion. Get ready for the pre-production units to hit fleets next year in 2019 for testing. The Nikola hydrogen electric trucks will take on any semi-truck and outperform them in every category; weight, acceleration, stopping, safety and features - all with a 500-1,000 mile range!"

Faked. This truck has never driven and probably never will. I'm guessing they had a pusher that they photoshopped out (which is pretty easy to do these days).
 

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Considering that hybrid drivetrains have been around for cars and locomotives for more than a decade, you would think all the current truck builders would have them.

Makes me think the point of their vehicles is oil consumption, not transportation.

This Nikola machine is just a thinly veiled attempt to create a natural gas consumption machine (via H2 reformation). They would consume less NG if they just build a hybrid drivetrain with a gas turbine genset.

But we know now that they start with the premise of building machines to provide a large market for their consumables. Transportation is just an afterthought for them.
 

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Considering that hybrid drivetrains have been around for cars and locomotives for more than a decade, you would think all the current truck builders would have them.
Hybrids provide their greatest advantage in urban stop-and-go situations; long-haul trucks are the opposite situation. There are short-haul hybrids; they don't make sufficient economic sense to be successful in the market, yet.

Makes me think the point of their vehicles is oil consumption, not transportation.
That's extraordinarily simplistic, and makes no sense. Companies buy trucks to do a job effectively, at minimum cost. Fuel consumption is part of both effectiveness (higher consumption means shorter range and/or less payload) and cost (obviously). Go ahead and build a truck which is cost-effective and uses less fuel; I assume you have billions of dollars for development. ;)

This Nikola machine is just a thinly veiled attempt to create a natural gas consumption machine (via H2 reformation). They would consume less NG if they just build a hybrid drivetrain with a gas turbine genset.
At least we agree that this design makes little if any technical sense, given the reality of the source of hydrogen. The natural gas turbine hybrid is Wrightspeed's design; they have targeted entirely different truck applications so far, where the technology makes more sense.
Wrightspeed
 
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