DIY Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested in converting an older (~2000) model Nissan Frontier truck. The older ones are a little smaller than the newer ones. I realize it will be on the heavy side, but it serves a huge need for me. I want to be able to get my family of 4 inside and be able to drive around town comfortably. I like that the chassis has lots of capacity to take on the extra weight of the batteries - but I'm worried about the final weight.

I have done the rough calculation to obey the 30% rule, and with a 144V system, you are pretty much exactly 30% battery weight after conversion.

I was wondering if anyone out there has converted or seen this vehicle converted. I am a first timer with this so all the input I get will be really appreciated.

thanks for reading!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
A little more info -
from a quick web search, the Curb Wt of the truck is 3911 lbs (before conversion).

From following the calculations in Bob Brant's book for the Ford ranger - a 144 V system will weigh ~ 1400+240 = 1640 lbs (batteries+motor etc)

So, we have:
3911 lbs - 600 lbs (ICE) = 3311 lbs (vehicle without ICE)

then add back in the batteries and motor
3311+1640=4951 lbs (vehicle weight after conversion)

Rule of thumb ratio: 30% of conversion weight is lead acid traction batteries

1440/4951 = 29.1%

Even thought this seems close - I dont want to spend all this money and energy and end up with a dog. Does anyone have a feel for whether this would be a good vehicle, or if it has ever been converted before?

I need this vehicle to get me to work and back (25 miles each way). I should be able to charge while I'm at work too. There are some hills and highway driving on the commute.

Any comments you have would really be appreciated.

thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
I would REALLY look for a smaller vehicle to convert. I consider 2800lbs of original curb weight to be on the upper fringe for a good conversion prospect. Your truck can be converted but with LA you will have a hard time with your one way range and hills. Charging at work will be an absolute must.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,891 Posts
I'm planning on a 156V system with same motor as the Jeep guy in a 91 S10 and hope to get 70miles with 26 T125 batteries. If it turns out to be a dog, you might change the rear gears to a lower gear. And voltage is king! Without it it won't move. Lots of it and it'll move along.

A 3.73 or 4.11 gear (chevy sizes) would produce more torque in the seat for any system. Larger gear number = more torque you'll feel. Likely you have a low 3 gear for economy. Mine has a 3.42, not bad but I don't think I can go higher with the rear I have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone for the responses.

Its interesting that the Jeep Cherokees on the evalbum are all using more voltage. Maybe the 156 or 160 V system would give me the speed, torque, and range I'd like to see when I'm done.

I haven't bought the vehicle yet - I just wanted to throw this out there to see what some folks with experience thought about the idea.

I really like the idea of working on a vehicle that has plenty of room for all the batteries. Even though its heavy - I'm still interested in moving ahead with the plan.

The bottom line is, it sounds like its not the ideal conversion vehicle, but it should work if I put enough batteries into it.

thanks for all your comments!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Remember one thing weight is what it is . changing gear ratio , using higher voltage , or any of that wont change the fact that it takes more power to move a larger mass , than a smaller one .Most important thing in an EV is to be efficient with what little energy you have . J.W. :)
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top