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Nissan Leaf powered Mercury Cougar

2664 Views 10 Replies 4 Participants Last post by  blackterminal
Hi, I'm in the process of converting a 2001 Mercury Cougar to electric. It will be powered by a 2011 Nissan Leaf motor (EM61), a Leaf inverter (with Paul Holmes drop in board) and a Nissan Leaf battery pack. Right now I have a Nissan Leaf Inverter, Paul Holmes Drop-in board (currently running in the inverter), entire Nissan Leaf battery pack (all the casing, wires, precharge circuit, BMS, etc.), Leaf Chademo and standard plug, a Tota Prius pedal, a box of SPIM08HP cells, and 2 Honda Civic Hybrid boxes. Currently I'm testing it at 225-ish Volts with max motor amps set to 100 Amps. The endgoal with this build is to make at least 270-300 HP, though that may require me to do a custom inverter. I hope I can at least get 150-200 HP out of the stock inverter for a few seconds, or short burst. http://cloud.tapatalk.com/s/5e271e2777206/VID_941371115_140030_689.mp4http://cloud.tapatalk.com/s/5e271e0b92c72/VID_712900727_043732_358.mp4
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Completely forgot I had a thread on here😅. Well even though the plans have changed slightly, I guess I'll pick up where I left off:
I am converting a 2001 2.5L Mercury Cougar to electric using a mix of parts from the Nissan Leaf, Tesla Model S, Toyota Prius, Ford Focus Electric, and Honda Civic Hybrid. The goal is to make a fun city car to rival the range and performance of my 2012 Ford Focus Electric (which is currently stripped out a bit in the back for fun), and eventually surpass it in both when I can get my hands on a battery pack over 60 kWh. Here's most of the parts I have or are currently planning to get:

Car: 2001 Mercury Cougar V6 - $450

Motor: 2011 Nissan Leaf (EM61) - $430

Inverter: 2011 Nissan Leaf Inverter with P and S (Paul Holmes) brainboard/ logic board. - (Inverter): $250, (P and S Brainboard): $340

Coupler: Brat Industries Nissan Leaf Coupler. Still need to take to machine shop and have the center piece of clutch plate pressed in. - $221

Adapter Plate: Will update when purchased.

Transmission: 2005 Ford Focus MTX-75. Plan to swap in the differential and ring gear from the Cougar MTX-75. - $258 (includes diff. and ring gear price)

Onboard Charger: 2014 Tesla Model S Onboard Charger (Gen 2, Part Number: 1014963-00-G) - $430

DCDC Converter: 2011 Nissan Leaf DCDC Converter - $250

Battery: 2012 Nissan Leaf 24 kWh Battery - $2,110 (from Battery Hookup)

BMS: For now, using the BMS/LBC that came with the battery pack. May eventually go to Orion BMS. - $ (refer to Battery)

Precharge Circuit: Reusing what came with Leaf battery

Charge Ports: Currently going to use the J1772 and Chademo that came with DCDC Converter, eventually switch to CCS. - $ (refer to DCDC Converter)

Battery Case: 2 Honda Civic Hybrid boxes (one can hold half the battery pack), but may just cut the Leaf case and use that instead. - $50 from picknpull

Vacuum Pump: Volvo Vacuum Pump. Also have the option of using the spare Focus Electric Vacuum pump I have. - $25

AC Compressor: Leaning towards my spare Ford Focus Electric compressor, or a Nissan Leaf compressor.

Power Steering: Update when bought, probably going to get the Opel Zafira B pump.

"Gas" Pedal: Toyota Prius Pedal - $15

Rotors: Drilled/Slotted Rotors, brake pads, and shims from eBay. - $244

CV Axles: Mercury Cougar 2.0L manual trans., still need to buy extension piece and bracket - $152

Suspension: Vogtland Lowering Springs, RockAuto Struts, Strut Bellows, Strut Mounts, Stabilizer Bar Endlinks, and polyurethane sway bar bushings. - $636
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
As mentioned before, I picked the Cougar up for $450. The rear passenger tire was separating, the interior had been torn apart and stuffed in the trunk (owner claims he was doing a part out of the car, and decided to just sell it as a whole instead, the engine had a vacuum leak, the front bumper was torn, spoiler was torn off, the poor car looked as if it hadn't been cleaned in years, and the automatic transmission couldn't shift past 2nd gear. Plus, not many muscle heads like the New Edge Cougar (even though it is a really good handling FWD car that is a successor to the Ford Probe, and fun to drive), as they would compare it to its RWD predecessors. Anyway, I got the car back to my house, and began the process of giving it a much needed bath, along with reassembling the interior. The last picture is after I cleaned the exterior.



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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The first picture is how messy of a condition the car was in. It took some time, but I eventually got it clean. I also began cleaning and putting back on the interior pieces. While cleaning the exterior, I ran into quite a bit brown widows, so I doused the underside of the car with bug spray to kill the critters. With the rear seats out and eventually the gas tank, I plan to put the battery modules in those two areas.



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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This is just when I began de-ICEing the Cougar. I drained the coolants, and began the removal of the exhaust system, intake, exhaust heat shield, gas tank, and EVAP canister. Also bought some new gas struts for hatch so it would stay up.



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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
With the arrival of the 24 kWh Nissan Leaf battery pack, I was able to begin disassembly of it for testing my motor/inverter. Breaking down a potentially 400 Volt battery that can generate 500 amps (so can produce over 217,000 Watts!) was a little nerve racking though. After disassembly, I took it to my room so I can run test on the motor/inverter. Now for some more terminology:

  • Max Continuous Discharge- Max amount of power you can make a cell produce without severely overheating it. This is the rating your battery pack should be built around.

  • Peak Discharge- Absolute max amount of power a cell can produce. Reaching this point can only be done for as little as a couple seconds, or as long as 10 seconds depending on the cell chemistry/setup. Reaching peak discharge often is not recommended, as it can shorten a batteries life span and potentially cause it to overheat.

  • Balance Charging (Balancing)- Balance charging is vital for lithium batteries connected in series. It is used to regulate the charge on the cells and make sure they receive an equal amount of charge. Without a Battery Management System (BMS) to balance cells, there is a chance a cell in a series connection will get finished charging before the others, and rather than having the BMS cut charging off for that cell, it will instead keep charging past it's rated max voltage. This can lead to a battery fire.
Battery Pack: Came with the required wires, thermistors, and Lithium Battery Controller (LBC). Fully charged, the 2011 Nissan Leaf battery pack is rated for 403.2 Volts, 64 Ah. This comes to 24,000 Watt Hours, or 24 kWh ( You find this number using Ohms Law, which sates if you multiply your Volts by Amperage, you'll get the Wattage. So 403.2 x 64 = 24,000. Now since 1,000 Watts hours is equal to 1 kWh, you'll need to divide the Wattage answer by 1,000. So 24,000 / 1,000 = 24).
-The pack can produce a max continuous discharge of 240 amps, and a peak discharge of 540 amps. Once again, using the same formula above (Volts x Amps = Watts), you can theoretically produce 96 kW (128 HP) MCD and 217 kW (291 HP) PD.
-There are 48 battery modules in the battery pack, and each module contains 4 individual cells. In total, there are 96 cells (48 modules x 4 cells per module). Each cell is rated for 2.8 Volts fully discharged, 4.2 Volts fully charged, and 32 Amp hours of capacity. Each module is a 2 Series, 2 Parallel connection rated for 5.6 Volts fully discharged, 8.4 Volts fully charged, and 64 Ah.


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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
For motor testing, I began by connecting the wires from my custom brainboard to their designated spots. Next, I took a 120 Volt AC to 12 DC power supply, connected pin 38 to the positive terminal of power supply, and pin 20 to the negative terminal of power supply, and plugged the power supply up to the wall outlet. Within a second or two I hear the clicking of the relay, followed the contactors closing.

Link to video of contactor testing: New video by Aaron Green

  • Pins 1 - Pin 11: These pins are for the motor resolver (12 Volt plug on bottom of motor)

  • Pin 14: Control board Ground

  • Pins 17, 19, 20: Ground for 12 V input power (can use these ground wires for the accelerator pedal, brake input, contactors, relay, etc.)

  • Pins 21, 23, 24: USB cable connections. Can take a phone charger cable, cut the end that goes to the phone off, strip it back, and connect corresponding wires (red wire is pin 21, USB VCC. Green wire is pin 23, USB Data+. White wire is pin 24, USB Data-.

  • Pin 26: Forward/Reverse Pin, changes motor direction.

  • Pin 27: 0-5 Volts analog brake input

  • Pin 29: 0-5 Volts analog throttle (this pin goes to the wiper 0-5 Volts pin on a Toyota Prius accelerator pedal)

  • Pin 30: +5 Volts from control board. This used to send a constant 5 volts to either the analog brake or analog throttle.

  • Pins 32, 34: CAN Low (32) and CAN High (34). Canbus doesn't function on 2011 Version of Paul's board.

  • Pin 35: Percharge Out+. Powers the precharge relay in the precharge circuit.

  • Pin 36: Contactor out+. Powers the positive coil of the main contactor in the precharge circuit.

  • Pin 37: Contactor out+. Powers the positive coil of the main contactor in the precharge circuit.

  • Pin 38:+ 12 Volt input power

  • Pin 40: +12 volt input power.








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Hi, I'm in the process of converting a 2001 Mercury Cougar to electric. It will be powered by a 2011 Nissan Leaf motor (EM61), a Leaf inverter (with Paul Holmes drop in board) and a Nissan Leaf battery pack. Right now I have a Nissan Leaf Inverter, Paul Holmes Drop-in board (currently running in the inverter), entire Nissan Leaf battery pack (all the casing, wires, precharge circuit, BMS, etc.), Leaf Chademo and standard plug, a Tota Prius pedal, a box of SPIM08HP cells, and 2 Honda Civic Hybrid boxes. Currently I'm testing it at 225-ish Volts with max motor amps set to 100 Amps. The endgoal with this build is to make at least 270-300 HP, though that may require me to do a custom inverter. I hope I can at least get 150-200 HP out of the stock inverter for a few seconds, or short burst. http://cloud.tapatalk.com/s/5e271e2777206/VID_941371115_140030_689.mp4http://cloud.tapatalk.com/s/5e271e0b92c72/VID_712900727_043732_358.mp4
View attachment 115533
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Hello. Nice car. We didnt have them in my country. Out of interest what made you use the Paul H board instead of a Open inverter one. And or did you consider using a Prius inverter with your Nissan motor? Just curious.
 
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