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Discussion Starter #1
I have a recently acquired beetle I'm looking to convert to electric. I am quite knowledgeable in motor controls, electronics, and wiring. Also have access to machine shops and welders. I run a custom automated machine building company, so I'm pretty versed in a wide range of tech.

Goals:
- Decent performance, would like to be able to spin the tires a bit on accel, and just be nice a quick in general
- Would like to be able to get to 65 or 75 mph
- Range not super important, but 40-60 miles would be nice
- Not a daily driver, just a fun ride that I want to add a lot of bells and whistles too (nice stereo, touchscreen controls, ext).
- Would be nice to do in phases, where I could spend more money to improve performance over time.

I'm considering:
- Motor/Controller: HyPer 9 144v motor, with HyPer-Drive X1 controller/inverter (a kit from Thunderstuck)
- Batteries: Used 18650 battery packs (was thinking I would start with 4 packs to be run at 96volts, then maybe add two later to get up to 144volt.

My concerns:
- This is getting crazy pricey with my above selection. Not sure if I'm throwing money away and there is a less expensive way to go?
- AC versus DC motor? Seem most older builds use DC (at least per EVAlbum), and more recently AC are becoming popular. I assume cost of AC has been coming down recently and performance is better. True?
- Someone recommended a salvaging a Nissan Leaf to harvest the parts for use, but I dread dealing with tearing that apart and welding together a Frankenstein. Plus they seem very tough to come by (at least by me -- Ohio) But if it makes sense?

Can anybody offer any tips to me?

Thanks for the help!

Some notes on my progress: http://smeker.org/index.php
 

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Currently doing a body-off resto on my 69 Bug Vert and have the same questions. Will follow this thread. Hopefully some responses....
 

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Hi

BEST would be getting something like a Leaf and using as any parts as you can - this is not for the faint hearted as in involves lots of electronics and CAN stuff

Assuming that is too difficult (it is for me)

DC can be cheap and powerful

AC can be expensive and wimpy - or VERY expensive and powerful

Batteries
Batteries from a crashed production EV are simply massively BETTER than any alternative AND a fraction of the price

I'm using an 11 inch Hitachi forklift motor - $200
Paul & Sabrina controller - $1000
and Chevy Volt Batteries - $1800

I have a Brusa Charger that I got for $700

For a VW I would suggest a 9 inch motor

https://www.diyelectriccar.com/foru...dubious-device-44370p15.html?highlight=duncan
 

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I have a recently acquired beetle I'm looking to convert to electric. I am quite knowledgeable in motor controls, electronics, and wiring. Also have access to machine shops and welders. I run a custom automated machine building company, so I'm pretty versed in a wide range of tech.

Goals:
- Decent performance, would like to be able to spin the tires a bit on accel, and just be nice a quick in general
- Would like to be able to get to 65 or 75 mph
- Range not super important, but 40-60 miles would be nice
- Not a daily driver, just a fun ride that I want to add a lot of bells and whistles too (nice stereo, touchscreen controls, ext).
- Would be nice to do in phases, where I could spend more money to improve performance over time.

I'm considering:
- Motor/Controller: HyPer 9 144v motor, with HyPer-Drive X1 controller/inverter (a kit from Thunderstuck)
- Batteries: Used 18650 battery packs (was thinking I would start with 4 packs to be run at 96volts, then maybe add two later to get up to 144volt.

My concerns:
- This is getting crazy pricey with my above selection. Not sure if I'm throwing money away and there is a less expensive way to go?
- AC versus DC motor? Seem most older builds use DC (at least per EVAlbum), and more recently AC are becoming popular. I assume cost of AC has been coming down recently and performance is better. True?
- Someone recommended a salvaging a Nissan Leaf to harvest the parts for use, but I dread dealing with tearing that apart and welding together a Frankenstein. Plus they seem very tough to come by (at least by me -- Ohio) But if it makes sense?

Can anybody offer any tips to me?

Thanks for the help!

Some notes on my progress: http://smeker.org/index.php

Ohh this sounds like a fun build! Here is my opinion and take it as you want. You are dead on with a hyper 9 system, those are the hottest motors right now and there's a list of reasons they've been selling like crazy since they came out! You can go the salvage leaf parts route and try to hack something together, but that is really hard at least for me. If you follow this design, you'll get an end result that is turn key, kicks butt, and drives better than a factory car would. Parts can be expensive, yes, but they are worth every freakin penny!!



Since you aren't shooting for much range, I would recommend the lower voltage model of the hyper 9, also quicker lead time.


-Hyper 9 system with controller 125 HP and 162 ft lbs of torque

-4 tesla modules
-elcon charger

-orion bms 2


This is in my opinon, a beautiful setup! If you want to turn the car into a beast, then go DC motor, but believe it or not, a hyper 9 setup is actually a bit cheaper than a warp 9 and a zilla! Depending on how much you want to spend, you can use either a 2.5kW elcon, or a beast 6.6kW elcon which is my personal favorite. The whole system would be easily setup on can bus, and you'd have a liquid cooled battery pack which you can heat as well.



Tesla modules are currently in my opinion, the best bang for your buck when it comes to lithium these days. Good power, very lightweight, compact, liquid cooled, easy thermal management with orion bms, and a good price in my opinion. I've got the best prices on all of the parts around, and will do my very best to give my support and help you with your project.


My source for these modules is the best, and same source used by most other places. They take great care with the modules, inspect them carefully, keep all of them grouped together per car so your pack is balanced, and they have a lot of low mileage modules. I sell these to help guys like us get the best lithium we can get for a good price.


And of course, I'll help with teaching you about all of the other systems and components as well. I currently have quite a bit of footage I need to edit and sort through as I am making videos for my youtube channel doing things like building the tesla battery pack, motor assembly, bms work, etc. I even take time to skype with guys to help walk them through each step of the bms software settings, and explaining what everything does. I do all I can to teach, because I started out doing this stuff with not a lot of clear information. I set out to help people get the right parts, at the best price, but most importantly, provide the best support and do all that I can to help along the way. Not abandon as I have been by other companies when I was starting out.



If you have questions or need some help getting this stuff at the best price, shoot me an email anytime [email protected]



Cheers,
Adam
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi

BEST would be getting something like a Leaf and using as any parts as you can - this is not for the faint hearted as in involves lots of electronics and CAN stuff

Assuming that is too difficult (it is for me)

DC can be cheap and powerful

AC can be expensive and wimpy - or VERY expensive and powerful

Batteries
Batteries from a crashed production EV are simply massively BETTER than any alternative AND a fraction of the price

I'm using an 11 inch Hitachi forklift motor - $200
Paul & Sabrina controller - $1000
and Chevy Volt Batteries - $1800

I have a Brusa Charger that I got for $700

For a VW I would suggest a 9 inch motor

https://www.diyelectriccar.com/foru...dubious-device-44370p15.html?highlight=duncan
Hi Duncan, thanks so much for your reply. Good info. I'm going to read about your build here in the coming days.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ohh this sounds like a fun build! Here is my opinion and take it as you want. You are dead on with a hyper 9 system, those are the hottest motors right now and there's a list of reasons they've been selling like crazy since they came out! You can go the salvage leaf parts route and try to hack something together, but that is really hard at least for me. If you follow this design, you'll get an end result that is turn key, kicks butt, and drives better than a factory car would. Parts can be expensive, yes, but they are worth every freakin penny!!



Since you aren't shooting for much range, I would recommend the lower voltage model of the hyper 9, also quicker lead time.


-Hyper 9 system with controller 125 HP and 162 ft lbs of torque

-4 tesla modules
-elcon charger

-orion bms 2


This is in my opinon, a beautiful setup! If you want to turn the car into a beast, then go DC motor, but believe it or not, a hyper 9 setup is actually a bit cheaper than a warp 9 and a zilla! Depending on how much you want to spend, you can use either a 2.5kW elcon, or a beast 6.6kW elcon which is my personal favorite. The whole system would be easily setup on can bus, and you'd have a liquid cooled battery pack which you can heat as well.



Tesla modules are currently in my opinion, the best bang for your buck when it comes to lithium these days. Good power, very lightweight, compact, liquid cooled, easy thermal management with orion bms, and a good price in my opinion. I've got the best prices on all of the parts around, and will do my very best to give my support and help you with your project.


My source for these modules is the best, and same source used by most other places. They take great care with the modules, inspect them carefully, keep all of them grouped together per car so your pack is balanced, and they have a lot of low mileage modules. I sell these to help guys like us get the best lithium we can get for a good price.


And of course, I'll help with teaching you about all of the other systems and components as well. I currently have quite a bit of footage I need to edit and sort through as I am making videos for my youtube channel doing things like building the tesla battery pack, motor assembly, bms work, etc. I even take time to skype with guys to help walk them through each step of the bms software settings, and explaining what everything does. I do all I can to teach, because I started out doing this stuff with not a lot of clear information. I set out to help people get the right parts, at the best price, but most importantly, provide the best support and do all that I can to help along the way. Not abandon as I have been by other companies when I was starting out.



If you have questions or need some help getting this stuff at the best price, shoot me an email anytime [email protected]



Cheers,
Adam

Hey Adam,

I've seen you post here and on Reddit, and have checked out your website in the past. That beetle you did was pretty sweet, I'll send you a email in the coming days here. I'm curious about those lithium batteries you used on that beetle build. Seems really compact and a lot of power. Talk to you soon!
 

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Ohh this sounds like a fun build! Here is my opinion and take it as you want. You are dead on with a hyper 9 system, those are the hottest motors right now and there's a list of reasons they've been selling like crazy since they came out! You can go the salvage leaf parts route and try to hack something together, but that is really hard at least for me. If you follow this design, you'll get an end result that is turn key, kicks butt, and drives better than a factory car would. Parts can be expensive, yes, but they are worth every freakin penny!!



Since you aren't shooting for much range, I would recommend the lower voltage model of the hyper 9, also quicker lead time.


-Hyper 9 system with controller 125 HP and 162 ft lbs of torque

-4 tesla modules
-elcon charger

-orion bms 2


This is in my opinon, a beautiful setup! If you want to turn the car into a beast, then go DC motor, but believe it or not, a hyper 9 setup is actually a bit cheaper than a warp 9 and a zilla! Depending on how much you want to spend, you can use either a 2.5kW elcon, or a beast 6.6kW elcon which is my personal favorite. The whole system would be easily setup on can bus, and you'd have a liquid cooled battery pack which you can heat as well.



Tesla modules are currently in my opinion, the best bang for your buck when it comes to lithium these days. Good power, very lightweight, compact, liquid cooled, easy thermal management with orion bms, and a good price in my opinion. I've got the best prices on all of the parts around, and will do my very best to give my support and help you with your project.


My source for these modules is the best, and same source used by most other places. They take great care with the modules, inspect them carefully, keep all of them grouped together per car so your pack is balanced, and they have a lot of low mileage modules. I sell these to help guys like us get the best lithium we can get for a good price.


And of course, I'll help with teaching you about all of the other systems and components as well. I currently have quite a bit of footage I need to edit and sort through as I am making videos for my youtube channel doing things like building the tesla battery pack, motor assembly, bms work, etc. I even take time to skype with guys to help walk them through each step of the bms software settings, and explaining what everything does. I do all I can to teach, because I started out doing this stuff with not a lot of clear information. I set out to help people get the right parts, at the best price, but most importantly, provide the best support and do all that I can to help along the way. Not abandon as I have been by other companies when I was starting out.



If you have questions or need some help getting this stuff at the best price, shoot me an email anytime [email protected]



Cheers,
Adam

Hey Adam,

I've seen you post here and on Reddit, and have checked out your website in the past. That beetle you did was pretty sweet, I'll send you a email in the coming days here. I'm curious about those lithium batteries you used on that beetle build. Seems really compact and a lot of power. Talk to you soon!
Thanks for the nice note! Yesss those cells are amazing, but those modules were super difficult to build as well. Doable, just a crap load of work. Unfortunately the company that made those, Xalt Energy in Michigan, no longer makes those cells as they are spoiled with multi million dollar contracts for electric busses. They’ve got other great cells, but those large format 75 ah cells are my favorite. They’re also rated to 14,000 cycles!! So yes they’re legendary haha..

Those cells were improved from the original 75 ah cells from Kokam in Korea. Unfortunately prices on those are very, very, expensive but I could help you get in with those cells if you really want them. They’ll put out 1200A like it’s nothing! I’ve since stopped using them because conversions cost enough already to do them professionally as a business, and those cells I think are around $300 per cell at least? It’s ridiculous!

I’ve got lots of connections with lithium across the world, and also have access to some small format cells which can handle extreme C rates if you need high performance. These are other Korean made cells that are used in military UAV aircraft.

Shoot me an email and we can talk lithium, I’d love to help connect you with whatever I can.

Cheers,

Adam
[email protected]
 

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Hey Adam,

I've seen you post here and on Reddit, and have checked out your website in the past. That beetle you did was pretty sweet, I'll send you a email in the coming days here. I'm curious about those lithium batteries you used on that beetle build. Seems really compact and a lot of power. Talk to you soon!
Adam can clarify the installation, but if you're referring to this photo (from the Hawkeye website) of a stack of cells in the front:

... that appears to be only about half of the battery (40 of the 80 cells or 11 kWh of the 22 kWh total); the rest is presumably in the luggage shelf area behind the back seat, because it's not in the engine compartment.

This front pack is also missing any substantial housing and doesn't appear to have any sort of thermal management; properly housing and supporting (structurally, thermally, and electrically) the cells is a significant part of the bulk, weight, and cost of the battery. A complete module of XALT cells typically looks like this:

and a pack with enclosure including thermal management, containing one of more of those modules, typically looks like this:

(Images are from XALT Energy website)
Most production EVs and plug-in hybrids other than Tesla use similar pouch cells, and package them similarly to XALT; the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf are examples, with modules that are used in many conversions.

In a typical XALT pack, 22 kWh of battery weighs about 125 kg (275 pounds). the latest XALT specs for the bare cells alone is 239 Wh/kg, or 92 kg for 80 cells at 75 Ah per cell and 3.68 V per cell nominal. The 2C discharge rating would correspond to about 45 kW.
 

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Hey Adam,

I've seen you post here and on Reddit, and have checked out your website in the past. That beetle you did was pretty sweet, I'll send you a email in the coming days here. I'm curious about those lithium batteries you used on that beetle build. Seems really compact and a lot of power. Talk to you soon!
Adam can clarify the installation, but if you're referring to this photo (from the Hawkeye website) of a stack of cells in the front:

... that appears to be only about half of the battery (40 of the 80 cells or 11 kWh of the 22 kWh total); the rest is presumably in the luggage shelf area behind the back seat, because it's not in the engine compartment.

This front pack is also missing any substantial housing and doesn't appear to have any sort of thermal management; properly housing and supporting (structurally, thermally, and electrically) the cells is a significant part of the bulk, weight, and cost of the battery. A complete module of XALT cells typically looks like this:

and a pack with enclosure including thermal management, containing one of more of those modules, typically looks like this:

(Images are from XALT Energy website)
Most production EVs and plug-in hybrids other than Tesla use similar pouch cells, and package them similarly to XALT; the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf are examples, with modules that are used in many conversions.

In a typical XALT pack, 22 kWh of battery weighs about 125 kg (275 pounds). The 2C discharge rating would correspond to about 45 kW.
Brian,

Thanks for the follow up. You are correct, the other half of the battery back is behind the rear seat.

Each of the 4 modules weighs 85 lbs off the scale complete, for a total weight of 340 lbs for the batteries and all structural parts of it. The modules are made out of 1/4” lexan polycarbonate, which is extremely tough. The bottom of the modules, which cannot be seen as the carpet hides them, have thick mounts that securely bolt the modules through the car and are supported with decent sized steel support bars underneath in the event of a roll over.

Obviously this is no factory OEM module, but I tried my best to make it as safe and clean looking as possible, and I think it turned out pretty well. Full credit to John Wayland at PlasmaBoy Racing as he taught me that module design and showed me how to build one, same design he has used on his legendary White Zombie, electric Datsun. I just added the white plastic divider things that I designed on the tops to make accidental shorts a little less likely.
 

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A salvaged Leaf sure seems to be the bang-for-buck champion. You can find them in good shape for $6-8k all day (the batteries got significantly more resilient in March 2013). Less if you can find a good wreck.

That gives you 24kWh of battery in a 400lb pack that doesn't require any coolant plumbing, and is easily reconfigured into various sizes and shapes. I suspect your car would only need half that for your goals.

The Leaf motor puts out 210ftlb of torque and spins to 10k. While I have yet to get my project on the road, Thunderstruck sells a few controllers that have yet to disappoint me:

https://www.thunderstruck-ev.com/dilithium-vcu.html

Even if you only take the motor and batteries and destroy the rest, you're still about even vs buying Tesla batteries and aftermarket AC motors. You also have an opportunity to recoup costs by selling the rest. Free contactors, heater, AC compressor, connectors, throttle, wire, fusebox, relays...Even if you pick up a Leaf motor, full pack, and controller without buying the whole car, you're still likely under $5k for a package that beats the Tesla + Hyper9 combo in power.

Tesla batteries are certainly better, but you pay for it, coolant is annoying, and they're an odd shape. I'm reserving Tesla batteries for projects where weight is a real concern for performance and they'll fit easily, even with plumbing.

With regard to the Hyper9...Maybe I'm ignorant of something that will bite me in my project, but I don't see any reason to go with an aftermarket motor that costs more, puts out less power, and won't spin as fast. You still have similar packaging/adaptation concerns between the two.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
A salvaged Leaf sure seems to be the bang-for-buck champion. You can find them in good shape for $6-8k all day (the batteries got significantly more resilient in March 2013). Less if you can find a good wreck.

That gives you 24kWh of battery in a 400lb pack that doesn't require any coolant plumbing, and is easily reconfigured into various sizes and shapes. I suspect your car would only need half that for your goals.

The Leaf motor puts out 210ftlb of torque and spins to 10k. While I have yet to get my project on the road, Thunderstruck sells a few controllers that have yet to disappoint me:

https://www.thunderstruck-ev.com/dilithium-vcu.html

Even if you only take the motor and batteries and destroy the rest, you're still about even vs buying Tesla batteries and aftermarket AC motors. You also have an opportunity to recoup costs by selling the rest. Free contactors, heater, AC compressor, connectors, throttle, wire, fusebox, relays...Even if you pick up a Leaf motor, full pack, and controller without buying the whole car, you're still likely under $5k for a package that beats the Tesla + Hyper9 combo in power.

Tesla batteries are certainly better, but you pay for it, coolant is annoying, and they're an odd shape. I'm reserving Tesla batteries for projects where weight is a real concern for performance and they'll fit easily, even with plumbing.

With regard to the Hyper9...Maybe I'm ignorant of something that will bite me in my project, but I don't see any reason to go with an aftermarket motor that costs more, puts out less power, and won't spin as fast. You still have similar packaging/adaptation concerns between the two.
Damn, you got me thinking here. Any tips on locating these other than Copart?
 

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There seem to be a lot more in southern California than anywhere else, so my experience might be quite biased.

I found mine on Craigslist, though it was an ad from a wrecking yard (it had been sidewiped and totaled)...You might try calling around to these places or say "So if you find a Leaf"...eBay always has components, but it'll be way cheaper to get the whole car. Might could try cars.com, Autotrader, even Facebook marketplace, etc...

My suspicion is that a lot of professional dismantlers have gotten wind of the reusability of EVs and are snatching all the wrecks up to part out profitably...Dunno.
 

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With regard to the Hyper9...Maybe I'm ignorant of something that will bite me in my project, but I don't see any reason to go with an aftermarket motor that costs more, puts out less power, and won't spin as fast. You still have similar packaging/adaptation concerns between the two.
The high price is the result of being a new (not used) product for a specialty market. The power limitation is presumably results from a lack of cooling. The speed limitation is driven by voltage.

I believe that the intent of the HyPer9 is to match the expectations of the existing industrial mobile equipment (and traditional EV conversion) market, but with a modern motor instead of a brushed DC motor. That means:
  • lower operating voltage than a typical OEM EV, with corresponding lower speed
  • standard mounting face
  • plain shaft
  • available with compatible controller that is independent of any other vehicle systems
For people whose conversions would not benefit from these features, there would be little appeal. In a Beetle conversion, if someone wants to use the original transaxle and well-understood mounting and shaft coupling solutions, the HyPer9 might be a good match. In a Beetle conversion without these constraints (and with CV-jointed axle shafts), a Chevrolet Bolt motor (as used by Yabert in his Westfalia T3 with Chevy Bolt drivetrain). A Leaf motor would have suitable power, but on the Leaf transaxle it wouldn't fit in the car, and without the Leaf transaxle it would need to be adapted to the VW transaxle... that's fundamentally similar to mounting a HyPer9 or other traditional motor, but the mounting adapter and shaft coupler are not readily available.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
With regard to the Hyper9...Maybe I'm ignorant of something that will bite me in my project, but I don't see any reason to go with an aftermarket motor that costs more, puts out less power, and won't spin as fast. You still have similar packaging/adaptation concerns between the two.
The high price is the result of being a new (not used) product for a specialty market. The power limitation is presumably results from a lack of cooling. The speed limitation is driven by voltage.

I believe that the intent of the HyPer9 is to match the expectations of the existing industrial mobile equipment (and traditional EV conversion) market, but with a modern motor instead of a brushed DC motor. That means:
  • lower operating voltage than a typical OEM EV, with corresponding lower speed
  • standard mounting face
  • plain shaft
  • available with compatible controller that is independent of any other vehicle systems
For people whose conversions would not benefit from these features, there would be little appeal. In a Beetle conversion, if someone wants to use the original transaxle and well-understood mounting and shaft coupling solutions, the HyPer9 might be a good match. In a Beetle conversion without these constraints (and with CV-jointed axle shafts), a Chevrolet Bolt motor (as used by Yabert in his Westfalia T3 with Chevy Bolt drivetrain). A Leaf motor would have suitable power, but on the Leaf transaxle it wouldn't fit in the car, and without the Leaf transaxle it would need to be adapted to the VW transaxle... that's fundamentally similar to mounting a HyPer9 or other traditional motor, but the mounting adapter and shaft coupler are not readily available.
Thanks for this. Been back and forth trying to figure out my best options here.

If I were to install a leaf motor on the VW trans, would I not be limited in rpm due to the VW trans? Stock VW motor maxes about 5k rpm I think, while the leaf motor is about 10k. Would this not be an issue?
 

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If I were to install a leaf motor on the VW trans, would I not be limited in rpm due to the VW trans? Stock VW motor maxes about 5k rpm I think, while the leaf motor is about 10k. Would this not be an issue?
If the transaxle can't handle input speeds much higher than the engine can run, then it would make the upper part of the motor's operating range unavailable... but that's okay as long as you can shift, because then you can just keep the motor speed between 2800 rpm and whatever the transaxle can handle and you have full motor power available.

If you pick one gear and leave it there, then you are limiting performance somewhat because you would need to pick a gear that doesn't run the transaxe too fast for safety at the highest highway speed, which will be a taller (higher) gear than ideal for the motor so you won't have as much power as possible at low speed. For instance, you might need to pick 3rd gear for highway speed, but need 2nd or 1st at low speed to get maximum motor power.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hi

I'm using an 11 inch Hitachi forklift motor - $200
Paul & Sabrina controller - $1000
and Chevy Volt Batteries - $1800
Hi Duncan, did you end up using and staying with the Chevy Volt batteries for your build? Putting 3 volt modules @ 48v in series only gets to about 6.5 KW and (per some rough Ebay pricing) would cost in the $2500 range. How do you do you configuration?
 

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Hi
I bought a Volt battery from CarParts dot Com - $1800 US

That was a complete battery - you can quite easily dismantle it to to the module level - seven x 2 kwh modules and two x 1 kwh modules

I did not have enough space for all the modules but I put three x 2 kwh + 1 x 1 Kwh into a single lump - and the same again for another "lump"

My controller is good for 400 volts so I put the lumps in series

I run from 295 volts (empty) to 340 volts (full) - which is a bit conservative but then I'm pulling up to 1200 amps (for a couple of seconds)

Very impressed with the engineering on the Volt battery
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Hey Guys,

So still working thru my design and planning out my wiring plan. Thinking about HV power flow, maintenance switches, main battery pack, 12v accessory battery, ext and not sure best method for overall power flow. I've attached my rough plan on the overall flow (not showing fuses, and detailed wiring, just the overall "turn this off, and everything below is off" type diagram. Can anyone comment and tell me what I'm doing wrong here? Any thoughts either way? Thanks for the advise!!!

Edit: while I don't have them, 99% sure I'm going with Leaf battery modules. I have the motor and Zilla 1K HV controller already. And leaning towards/designing around a Thunderstruck Charger and BMS and DC-DC converter. I've read thru all the manuals, but am still left with this general design plan questions. Thanks for the help!

 

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Discussion Starter #20
If anyone is interested, attached is an image of the preliminary motor/controller mount with contactor and maintenance shut-offs. This end of things is pretty simple from a power flow standpoint, still debating on what to do per my post above tho.

And a link to a detailed 3D model that can be exploded and sectioned for the curious: https://autode.sk/2YhFP6f


 
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