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Discussion Starter #1
I've already built my 944, a 914, working with a group on a Factory 5 Type 65, repaired and helped with many other vehicles.

Right now an aging Nissan Pathfinder, is the gas guzzling tow vehicle we only drive when required.

I'd love to have an electric option. And before you all say Tesla Cybertruck or wait for the upcoming electric F150, budget is a significant factor in the equation, along with the challenge. I can do the design and install myself, I've gotten pretty good at sourcing good but inexpensive parts, and with Battery Hookup having great deals on good quality modules, a giant battery fit for an F150 gets into the realm of possibility. I have 66kwh of LG Chevy modules going into my 944 to replace the aging LiFePO4. I believe that using 30 of the 10S LG/Chevy Bolt modules would give me a pretty decent pack nearing 200kwh. I would also use a Tesla large drive unit, possibly with the Zero EV custom 4.5:1 gear set into the stock transfer case and driveline. A truck with the 3.31 rear end should give decent top speed while having incredible torque which would allow mild towing and retain the factory 4wd system and suspension. (this is mainly for towing, if I wasn't towing I'd probably look at dropping an S/X subframe under it, but then I wouldn't really need a truck in the first place).

A production F150 will have as much or more power, and torque, probably with dual motor 4wd, and lots of cool features and CCS fast charging. My F150 will cost less and have a larger battery, I'd be amazed if Ford starts with anything above 140-150kwh. Can't do CCS yet, but there are a few Chademo options, and up here in Canada most of the DCFS stations are both Chademo and CCS for the moment.

Mid level trucks are coming down in price as they age, getting into a well equipt XTR/FX4 or Lariat isn't that big a stretch. There are some ECU/similar modules that will become very unhappy, however with Forscan and possibly some signal spoofing I really just need ABS and the transfer case to keep working in the drive system. The trucks already have electric power steering, and that's possibly one system that might be unhappy without an engine, but I don't see why it couldn't be made to work with some effort. The cluster may go away entirely as it may be too difficult to make happy especially the 8" display version.

Are there any Ford guys out there that can tell me what really isn't going to work without an engine & transmission, fuel system etc etc.

I'm not new to the game, however this is a bit bigger project than anything I've built yet.
 

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That all generally makes sense to me, except that I don't know how you are going to fit 30 of those modules in with the stock driveline (axles, shafts...) in place. There's a reason that all of the proposed production electric pickups have separate front and rear drive units (so no shaft down the middle of the truck) and wider frames than conventional trucks.

Good luck with your project; I'm looking forward to updates.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That all generally makes sense to me, except that I don't know how you are going to fit 30 of those modules in with the stock driveline (axles, shafts...) in place. There's a reason that all of the proposed production electric pickups have separate front and rear drive units (so no shaft down the middle of the truck) and wider frames than conventional trucks.

Good luck with your project; I'm looking forward to updates.
Valid points, but for the most part an OEM won't split a pack, I will be filling the engine bay with batteries, as well as the open areas under the body. I forgot to mention it will be a Supercrew, so the truck itself is quite long. I don't have accurate measurements yet, but using online images and known sized items I've done a rough layout and with an efficient battery box/cooling layout, 30 won't be a problem. The battery boxes will be far from the lowest point, however they will likely sit just below the body line, IE even with the running boards.

For comparison, I'm putting 10 modules in my 1986 Porsche 944. It will be a bit tight width-wise in the engine bay, however that will fit 6 modules while keeping the stock radiator for motor/inverter/battery cooling.
 

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Valid points, but for the most part an OEM won't split a pack, I will be filling the engine bay with batteries, as well as the open areas under the body. I forgot to mention it will be a Supercrew, so the truck itself is quite long. I don't have accurate measurements yet, but using online images and known sized items I've done a rough layout and with an efficient battery box/cooling layout, 30 won't be a problem. The battery boxes will be far from the lowest point, however they will likely sit just below the body line, IE even with the running boards.
It's true that production vehicles rarely have a battery in multiple packs, for cost, complexity, and production reasons. In the only factory electric pickup that I'm aware of - the Ford Ranger EV from two decades ago - the frame crossmembers were modified to allow a single pack (although of a convoluted shape) to be used. That truck did not have a transmission or propeller shaft in the middle.

If you haven't looked at it yet, I suggest the Ford Body Builder Advisory Service for reference information.
Example: 2018 F-150 Body Builders Layout Book

For comparison, I'm putting 10 modules in my 1986 Porsche 944. It will be a bit tight width-wise in the engine bay, however that will fit 6 modules while keeping the stock radiator for motor/inverter/battery cooling.
I shudder when I see underhood spaces filled with massive battery modules, especially overhanging the front right out the radiator location. It is often all too high and too far forward. I hope the 944's dynamics are not completely ruined by that.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's true that production vehicles rarely have a battery in multiple packs, for cost, complexity, and production reasons. In the only factory electric pickup that I'm aware of - the Ford Ranger EV from two decades ago - the frame crossmembers were modified to allow a single pack (although of a convoluted shape) to be used. That truck did not have a transmission or propeller shaft in the middle.

If you haven't looked at it yet, I suggest the Ford Body Builder Advisory Service for reference information.
Example: 2018 F-150 Body Builders Layout Book


I shudder when I see underhood spaces filled with massive battery modules, especially overhanging the front right out the radiator location. It is often all too high and too far forward. I hope the 944's dynamics are not completely ruined by that.
Thanks for the links, that will be quite helpful for the preliminary layout before I get the truck. It will let me confirm if my numbers were close.

As for the 944, it's currently too light on the front, the pack will be up against the firewall and sitting on the suspension crossmember so rearward and as low as possible. Likely not that much different than the stock engine from a centre of gravity standpoint, however it will probably be up 100lbs over the stock weight in the front (meaning 100lbs higher and more forward than idea, exactly as you said) The stock radiator will be in place with the battery box a few inches behind it.

In the rear I'm going to look at the possibility of running the drive unit in reverse and swap the lubrication pump direction so that I can run the motor in front of the axle because the remaining 4 modules will be behind the axle as low as practical where the fuel tank/spare tire was. Flipping the motor would put the batteries forward quite a bit allowing them to be behind the motor vs above and behind it. There are a few known compromises with this setup, the car isn't ideal for 66kwh but the desire is more of a "small" grand touring car, not a track car.
 

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Porsche 944 sidetrack

In the rear I'm going to look at the possibility of running the drive unit in reverse and swap the lubrication pump direction so that I can run the motor in front of the axle because the remaining 4 modules will be behind the axle as low as practical where the fuel tank/spare tire was. Flipping the motor would put the batteries forward quite a bit allowing them to be behind the motor vs above and behind it.
That makes sense, but the motor and inverter would probably not fit between the arms of the 944 suspension and behind the torsion bar housing.
 

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Easy to toss around kWh numbers, but the back of my envelope says that your F150's going to be pretty useless as a truck carrying all that battery in a '150.

I'd go Super Duty. Ideally an F250 DIESEL. That way you'll be sprung for a lot of pack up front and you'll still have GVWR-constrained payload and towing left to have the semblance of a truck.

Tesla as a powertrain I'm not so sure about. If you want a truck, not a car with a box on it for moving friends' girlfriends' shoe collections (I kid you not, it was a truck box full when they moved apartments), do not fall into the car design trap like Tesla did.
 

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By the time you're done, a used Model X will probably be cheaper (tows 5,000 lb)...Or a Polestar (3,300 lb).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Re: Porsche 944 sidetrack

That makes sense, but the motor and inverter would probably not fit between the arms of the 944 suspension and behind the torsion bar housing.
That's definitely possible, however the front drive unit is angled up unlike the rear drive unit in it's OEM position.

As you can see from this image (borrowed from Stealth EV's product listing for the Small front drive unit).
I have no affiliation to Stealth EV but I'm borrowing their image so I think it's fair to link to their product page. https://stealthev.com/product/tesla-front-drive-unit/

This may or may not sit above the suspension arms I'll have to confirm measurements. It will easily fit in with the motor rearward of the axle.

I should probably throw this in my 944 thread instead.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Easy to toss around kWh numbers, but the back of my envelope says that your F150's going to be pretty useless as a truck carrying all that battery in a '150.

I'd go Super Duty. Ideally an F250 DIESEL. That way you'll be sprung for a lot of pack up front and you'll still have GVWR-constrained payload and towing left to have the semblance of a truck.

Tesla as a powertrain I'm not so sure about. If you want a truck, not a car with a box on it for moving friends' girlfriends' shoe collections (I kid you not, it was a truck box full when they moved apartments), do not fall into the car design trap like Tesla did.
This is the kind of feedback I'm looking for, thank you!
I'll have to compare payloads closer between models/trims, I had seen the range of 2250-3300lbs payload and 12,000lbs towing (or just above can't remember)

I have about 900lbs coming out so far but component weights are hard to find reliable info on, (also assuming full tank of gas) I will be putting in roughly 2300lbs, or a net change around 1300lbs give or take assuming there's more weight I haven't accounted for in the emissions/fuel systems, stock battery etc.

This leaves payload in the 1000-2000lbs range depending on trim (which I will find out based on the actual trucks I'm considering).

I'll compare the F250 as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
By the time you're done, a used Model X will probably be cheaper (tows 5,000 lb)...Or a Polestar (3,300 lb).
This would be an excellent option, however in western Canada they are few and far between, and based on the towing others have done I'd need a 100D even with supercharger access which is growing but not extensive in the areas I'd like to use the truck. Most have a used price still north of 100k CAD.

My budget for the truck itself is 15-25k and around $25k in parts (there will be more small items but this is ideally offset by selling the engine/transmission and other parts). I have lots of leftover contactors, wire, dc/dc converter, some instrumentation and other small items that add up.

Please keep in mind this is CANADIAN DOLLARS, or roughly $29,500- 36,800 USD TOTAL depending on the cost of the truck.

Sadly we can't import Tesla's from the USA so suggesting importing one is a no go.
 

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Sadly we can't import Tesla's from the USA so suggesting importing one is a no go.
Why not? The federal government has a whole agency to facilitate imports from the U.S. to Canada (the Registrar of Imported Vehicles), and a Tesla is sold in identical form in the U.S. and Canada so documenting that it meets Canadian regulations should be trivial (other than perhaps the common lack of daytime running lights in U.S. market vehicles).

Do you mean that Tesla won't support (with warranty coverage, access to authorized service, or Supercharger access) an imported vehicle? I don't know why they would care, since they don't have dealers to be upset at losing a sale.
 

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I'll have to compare payloads closer between models/trims, I had seen the range of 2250-3300lbs payload...

I have about 900lbs coming out so far but component weights are hard to find reliable info on, (also assuming full tank of gas) I will be putting in roughly 2300lbs, or a net change around 1300lbs give or take...

This leaves payload in the 1000-2000lbs range depending on trim (which I will find out based on the actual trucks I'm considering).
I think you'll find that 2200 pounds is the about the highest payload available for an F-150 that anyone would actually buy; higher values than that assume an ideal configuration (regular cab, only one specific engine, no other options other than payload package). Look at the Maximum Payload Capabilities table in the F-150 specs, and keep in mind that those payloads assume base trim and zero options, and that every value over a tonne has a double asterisk leading to a note that it "Requires Heavy Duty Payload Package".

Take 1300 pounds (590 kg) plus a 80 kg driver out of those payloads, and you don't have much of a truck left. I suspect that any F-150 that you could actually find on a dealer's lot would have very little remaining payload after 200 kWh of battery.
 
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