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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all!

I hope everyone is doing well and staying healthy.

I really appreciate anyone who takes the time to read this post, and especially those and reply.

I would love some help with this conversion as I am finding it very difficult to set a budget for it. There are a variety of options for every part and a variety of ways to set a system up.

Ill start with the grit:
Vehicle: 1991 range rove
Weight: ~4500-5000 lbs
Range: I am trying to build a modular system so I can start with 50-100mi range and add more batteries as a save up.

Parts I am thinking about:
I feel like the motor is the biggest question mark.
Motor: This one is tough because I am not looking to race, but the vehicle is heavy. I have thought about the Kostov motor a10 or a11 due to price, but an AC motor would be preferred (I live in a hilly area). Ac options ive considered the Curtis AC-76 or the hyper9. [I am not sure any of these motors would actually move the truck]

Controller: not sure yet, depends on motor selection

Battery:I wane back and forth, I think tesla batter packs would be the easiest and lightest options. I could save on my budget and get 6 packs for a shorter range. Or I could could spend a little more and get a complete model 3 pack.
I am not sure if using a third party bms system or cooling system is as simple in the real world as It is in my head.

BMS: Orion

Charger: the eltek valeo, mostly because it works well with the orion bms.

I did not list other items, mostly because I *feel* that other part selection is a little more straight forward.

Thanks for reading!

Please let me know if there is any additional information that may help.

For those who are interested.

Background: This 2-door range rover was my dream vehicle since I was a kid. Saved up and purchased a fairly clean truck from Spain. The day I picked it up, The engine overheated and broke down two hours from my house. Fortunately, the rover broke down in front of a church and some great people helped me out of that disappointing situation. I am now in the position were I must save up once again to repair the vehicle that I just purchased :p. I have two options, find an old rebuilt engine or buy a new one. An old rebuilt engine may be 3-5k but does not come with a warranty or any guarantee. A new motor might require a new beefier transmission and would cost 8-24k. I figured if I elected to go with a new motor it might be worthwhile to convert the truck to an EV. Regardless of the route I choose, I am hoping to pick an economical option (I was prepared to repair an hold vehicle, but I didn't expect to have to repair the engine the same day I picked it up).

Again, Thank you for reading!
 

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... I think tesla batter packs would be the easiest and lightest options. I could save on my budget and get 6 packs for a shorter range. Or I could could spend a little more and get a complete model 3 pack.
Just to make life easier, these would be six modules in the standard terminology; a complete Tesla Model S or X pack has 14 or 16 (depending on variant) identical modules. The complete Model 3 pack has four very large (especially long) modules (two of each of two different sizes).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ahh, yes. thanks for clarifying. The "Budget" battery option I am considering is six Tesla modules. The Battery pack I am considering is the complete Model 3 pack.

I also considered the complete Nissan leaf pack, but they are 24kwh and I could only find those used at ~70% capacity at best.
 

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Ac options ive considered the Curtis AC-76...
Curtis Instruments makes controllers; HPEVS sells motors (I don't know if they make them or have them made for them) named "AC-nn". There would not be a Curtis motor of any model.

The HPEVS AC-76 is no longer in production, but EV West may still have some stock of them - they list a few items which must have been sitting around for several years.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Do you know if any of the Motors would be powerful enough to move the truck? (Hopefully up to Highway speeds)

The motor dictates everything else.

If I would need to go to use a different motor or even two motors, I would need more batteries just to reach the required voltage.
 

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The Battery pack I am considering is the complete Model 3 pack.
That's a huge (literally) challenge to fit into any vehicle which was not designed to fit a large under-floor battery pack. Even if you take it apart, the modules are very long so it is hard to imagine where they would go in a Range Rover.

I also considered the complete Nissan leaf pack, but they are 24kwh and I could only find those used at ~70% capacity at best.
Nissan Leaf battery packs are various capacities depending on the year and option:
  • 24 kWh
  • 30 kWh (starting 2016)
  • 40 kWh (starting 2017)
  • 62 kWh (optional starting recently)
There presumably won't be any of the new 62 kWh available yet, but you may be able to find higher than 24 kWh.
 

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Motor: This one is tough because I am not looking to race, but the vehicle is heavy. I have thought about the Kostov motor a10 or a11 due to price, but an AC motor would be preferred (I live in a hilly area). Ac options ive considered the Curtis AC-76 or the hyper9. [I am not sure any of these motors would actually move the truck]
Do you know if any of the Motors would be powerful enough to move the truck? (Hopefully up to Highway speeds)

The motor dictates everything else.

If I would need to go to use a different motor or even two motors, I would need more batteries just to reach the required voltage.
The HyPer 9 or any HPEVS motor seems marginal for such a heavy vehicle, if you want anything close to the performance normally expected of a road vehicle in this century.

HPEVS sells a double motor which is two motors on a common shaft and in a common case... but it still needs two controllers. The need for two controllers is one reason that double motors make no sense to me - it's simpler to just get one properly sized motor. If you do use two motors, that means your battery needs more capability to deliver current, but doesn't change the voltage (the controllers are wired in parallel with each other).
 
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