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In the forklift they will be doing about 1500 rpm

You will be feeding them more volts and using higher rpm's

I'm using a Hitachi 11 inch motor - it's 48v and 10 KW - 1400 rpm
When I was feeding it 130v it would only do 3500 rpm in my car - 100 kph

Feeding it 144v however was fine

(I'm now feeding it 1200 amps and 340v - and I have taken it up to 5300 rpm)

I would worry that a 72 volt motor may need too high a voltage to get the revs you need
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Gents, I may have found something suitable and was just hoping for the thumbs up?
It’s a Daewoo 7.5kw 48V motor with a part number of 954/a164332 if anyone could give me a yay or a nay?
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
I’ve missed out in this motor but, still looking and, I’ve tracked down a forklift dismantlers about 250 miles away that say they can definitely help.
I’ve just messaged them with the spec I’m after and am now waiting for them to get back to me.
I’ve also invested in a ‘how to convert your car to electric’ manual for so exciting pre bedtime reading!
Hopefully I’ll start moving forward at some point!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
While my quest for a motor continues, I thought I cut up one of the other 924 shells I have and have a good look at the feasibility of mounting some of the batteries under the boot floor.
The depth from the top of the boot floor to the top of the gearbox isn’t as deep as I expected but, I think I could probably build a carrier that was deeper on the sides of the transmission.
It there great variety in sizes and dimensions of the various battery packs that I’ll be able to pick up from a damaged car?
 

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While my quest for a motor continues, I thought I cut up one of the other 924 shells I have and have a good look at the feasibility of mounting some of the batteries under the boot floor.
It is certainly convenient to have multiple body shells to work with. I have often thought that by the time someone has completely torn apart and understood a vehicle for a conversion, they will likely have destroyed one body shell, and they probably know enough to do a couple of different styles of conversion of that model.

The depth from the top of the boot floor to the top of the gearbox isn’t as deep as I expected but, I think I could probably build a carrier that was deeper on the sides of the transmission.
My understanding is that is the fuel tank location. You just have to look at the tank shape, which has a flat top (against the cargo compartment floor, which has been cut out of this body) and drops down on each side of the transmission, to see what volume is available and how it is shaped. Unfortunately, prismatic cells are rigid rectangular blocks which don't pack well into spaces like that, pouch cells are flat rectangular pouches which only work reasonably when stacked into larger rectangular boxes, and little cylindrical cells take an enormous amount of fabrication work to assemble into functional modules.

Here's a tank sitting - upside down - in the cargo space above where it gets mounted, borrowed from a blog about the fuel tank showing which shows its shape and size:

The big dent in the middle is where it fits over the rear end of the transmission.

I had not seen a 924 spare tire well before - that's hilarious. :D Apparently the well is sized and shaped for a full size tire sticking way up into the cargo space, and the stock spare is a collapsible thing that tucks down in the well (diagonally) so it doesn't stick up... until you have a flat and need to put the flat tire in there. Just looking at the bare body I first wondered why they didn't set the spare flat, extending forward over the transmission (and resulting in a big bay for battery)... then I realized where the fuel tank goes.

It there great variety in sizes and dimensions of the various battery packs that I’ll be able to pick up from a damaged car?
There is certainly variation. You won't be able to fit an entire pack, but you will be able to mount modules salvaged from a production EV, in a different arrangement than used in car designed to fit them. All modules are rectangular boxes, but they vary in proportions, and their size depends on both the total battery capacity and the number of modules it is split into. Some of the smaller modules are from the Nissan Leaf, because the original version splits 40 kWh or less of capacity into 48 modules (and a later updates bonds those together in pairs for 24 twice-as-tall blocks); the largest that I've seen are from the Tesla Model 3, which puts up to 75 kWh of capacity in only four very long and substantially wide modules.
 
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