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Hello GDIRWIN,

With the help of you, Dimitri, Cap Weir and others I have nearly completed reverse engineering of the MR-2 Electro-Hydraulic Power Steering Pump and can describe the pump's characteristics and give a complete, basic wiring diagram for EV conversions. I will publish the results in the appropriate place on DIY Electric Vehicles website when I finish and can figure out how to do this. To complete this article I would like to know what the signal from the transmission-mounted, vehicle speed sensor such is on my 1999 Toyota Tacoma with standard transmission and no Automatic Braking System (ABS). This is because I use it as an example in the article of vehicles that are not equipped with ABS. The VSS for the MR-2 is taken from its ABS. If yours does not have ABS and does have the transmission-mounted sensor, then maybe you have this information. In any event you might be interested in receiving my current draft because the published version may be delayed until I find this information and the curve, "Vehicle Speed vs Pump Speed". If so, send me an e-mail and I will respond with this draft. Included will be figures such as the MR-2 vehicle speed signal form. My address is [email protected].
EAGERWJ
 

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Hello engineer Bill,

With the help of many DIY Electric Vehicle contributors and others I have very nearly completed reverse engineering of the MR-2 Electro-Hydraulic Power Steering Pump and can describe the pump's characteristics and give a complete, basic wiring diagram for its inclusion in EV conversions. I will publish the results in the appropriate place on DIY Electric Vehicles website when I finish and can figure out how to do this. To complete this article I would like to know what the signal is from the transmission-mounted, vehicle speed sensor on my 1999 Toyota Tacoma with standard transmission and no Automatic Braking System (ABS). This is because I use it as an example in the article of vehicles that are not equipped with ABS. The VSS for the MR-2 is taken from its ABS. If yours does not have ABS and does have the transmission-mounted sensor, then maybe you have this information. In any event you might be interested in receiving my current draft because the published version may be delayed until I find this information and the curve, "Vehicle Speed vs Pump Speed". If so, send me an e-mail and I will respond with this draft. Included will be figures such as the MR-2 vehicle speed signal form. My address is [email protected].
EAGERWJ
 

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Hello dimitri,

With the help of you and other DIY contributors I have nearly completed the reverse engineering of the MR-2 Electro-Hydraulic Power Steering Pump and can describe the pump's characteristics and give a complete, basic wiring diagram for EV conversions can use most of its functions. I will publish the results in the appropriate place on DIY Electric Vehicles website when I finish and can figure out how to do this. To complete this article I would like to know what the signal is from the transmission-mounted, vehicle speed sensor on my 1999 Toyota Tacoma with standard transmission and no Automatic Braking System (ABS). This is because I use it as an example in the article of vehicles that are not equipped with ABS. As you know the VSS for the MR-2 is taken from its ABS. If yours does not have ABS and does have the transmission-mounted sensor, then maybe you have this information or similar information for your vehicle. If so, then it may be practicable to design and make a conditioning circuit that will convert such signals to the MR-2 form if it is not there already. In any event you might be interested in receiving my current draft because the published version may be delayed until I find this information and the curve, "Vehicle Speed vs Pump Speed". If so, send me an e-mail and I will respond with this draft. Included will be figures such as the MR-2 vehicle speed signal form. My address is [email protected].
EAGERWJ
 

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Hello TelnetManta,

With the help of DIY contributors I have nearly completed the reverse engineering of the MR-2 Electro-Hydraulic Power Steering Pump and can describe the pump's characteristics and give a complete, basic wiring diagram for EV conversions. I will publish the results in the appropriate place on DIY Electric Vehicles website when I finish and can figure out how to do this. To complete this article I would like to know what the signal from the transmission-mounted, vehicle speed sensor such is on my 1999 Toyota Tacoma with standard transmission and no Automatic Braking System (ABS). This is because I use it as an example in the article of vehicles that are not equipped with ABS. The VS for the MR-2 is taken from its ABS. If yours does not have ABS and does have the transmission-mounted sensor, then maybe you have this information. In any event you might be interested in receiving my current draft because the published version may be delayed until I find this information and the curve, "Vehicle Speed vs Pump Speed". If so, send me an e-mail and I will respond with this draft. Included will be figures such as the MR-2 vehicle speed signal form. My address is [email protected].
EAGERWJ
 

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Dimitri, thank you for taking the time to post this very helpful information.
I have a question. I have a similar pump out of a 2005 volvo v50. The pump has only 5 leads, pos/neg end 3 other leads for "signals" from the host vehicle.
I have priced the MR2 pumps and have found that they are more expensive and harder to find. The volvo pumps are much cheaper and easier to find.
Can you point me in the direction as to where I could find info as to how to wire my pump?
Ill post a picture of my pump as well.
Thank you for any help.
Marco.

 

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Dimitri, thank you for taking the time to post this very helpful information.
I have a question. I have a similar pump out of a 2005 volvo v50. The pump has only 5 leads, pos/neg end 3 other leads for "signals" from the host vehicle.
I have priced the MR2 pumps and have found that they are more expensive and harder to find. The volvo pumps are much cheaper and easier to find.
Can you point me in the direction as to where I could find info as to how to wire my pump?
Ill post a picture of my pump as well.
Thank you for any help.
Marco.
Hey that's great to hear of another pump option. Best place to find wiring information will be the Factory service manual for the car it came from. Might be able to find it posted on the net or check to see if there are forums for that make model car. Let us know what you find.

Thaniel
 

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Hey that's great to hear of another pump option. Best place to find wiring information will be the Factory service manual for the car it came from. Might be able to find it posted on the net or check to see if there are forums for that make model car. Let us know what you find.

Thaniel
Thaniel thank you. I am happy that I was able to contribute, abeit a small contribution.
I have found in my search that there are many many makes that are using these handy units.
I will check the volvo forums for the schematics.
 

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Based on Dmitri's wiring, is anyone having trouble with the MR2 pump spinning backwards? While it does spin, we're getting suction on the high pressure side of the pump, and aeration in the fluid reservoir whenever we crack the high pressure output fitting. But when we reverse the battery leads to the pump to change motor direction, the positive lead appears to be going directly to ground and immediately blows fuses.

Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.
HANK
 

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"Here are the Toyota part#'s for the electrical Connectors: These part#'s get the Plastic part only, The metal pin wiring parts are sold separately. Maybe someone can add the part#'s for those.
Part#'s Large connector 90980-12068
Middle connector 90980-10897
Small end connector 90980-10942"


Has anyone found the part #s associated with these connectors listed in post one of this thread? The local Toyota dealer is having problems finding them.
 

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I've got the part numbers for the individual pins within the connector shields identified earlier. These are for the "splice" which has the connector and waterproof plug for an individual pin all put together on a six inch pigtail. So you just push this splice into the appropriate slot of the connector and then connect it to a longer wire back into your harness.

The power connector for the pump takes two 82998-12500
The other two connectors use 82998-12440.


I ordered them from toyotapartscenter.net
I ordered six of the smaller ones (12440) just in case I loused one up. It turns out that they're pretty simple, so I've got a couple extra. Both items were $5.24 each as of mid April. With the cost of the connector shields, the whole order wound up at $72 with shipping. It's a little pricey, but I feel a lot better about the arrangement than my previous attempt consisting of squeezed crimp connectors with lots of electrical tape.
 

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An old thread, but I learned so much and thought I would post my experience with this pump.

I recently installed this pump in an an 82 Toyota 4x4, with a gas engine in order to see if I could improve my mileage. On a recent trip from Vancouver to Regina (1700km) I appeared to save 40L, so it looks promising, but more logging on future trips will be required. I manually turned the pump off on the highway and want to use the VSS to control it better.

I did some measurements today and thought I would share them.

The pump draws about 8-9A after a cold start and could pull up to 44A (RPM >2000)in a full turn with my steering box.

I hooked up the TTL port on my function generator and noted the following current draw vs Freq (Hz).

Freq (Hz) Current (Amp)
20 Hz 8.5A
36 Hz 7A
52 Hz 5.6A
63 Hz 5A
83 Hz 4A
110 Hz ~3A
>150 Hz 2.2 to 2.7A

It was neat to ramp the pump speed up and down with the Fn gen.

Also to note, when starting at around 8A and not turning the wheel the pump would wind down little on it's own from around 8A to 5.9A to around 3.5A within about a minute.

But I still want the pump off at highway speeds and noticed that pulling the EFI wire to ground, shuts the pump off with 12V supplied to the pump via the IGN wire. I actually did this using a 1k resistor to be safe, but I bet the MR2, ECU just uses a relay or MOSFET to do this.

I am making a custom Cruise controller for my truck and will interface the VSS and, pump warning and EFI wires to it. I will just use a relay to ground for the EFI wire when it senses around 90kph and turn the pump back on at around 80 kph. The cruise controller also acts as a remote starter module to help set the choke and a PID routine to assist if the RPM is unstable after a really cold start.

I don't want the pump to start if the remote starter is functioning or if I just turn the key on (engine off, recall I'm still driving with a carb) so my controller will not able the pump unless it detects the engine started and the brake is depress so the EFI wire on the pump will come in handy here.

Other notes:

My reservoir had a leak when I received it. I also had to re-position reservoir return line so I had to the remove it anyway. I ended up getting a new O ring from a local bearing supplier for $0.50 ea. They just matched one up, so I got some spares at that price.

I am using Mobile, 100% Synthetic ATF like I have been doing for years with zero issues with this pump.

I swapped out the cheap 30A relay I was initially using and am now using a 75A, 12V device from Tyco, Part# V23232-D0001-X001. ebay was a good source for these for me to Canada.
 

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@ 5440

I just obtained a 2002 MR2 PS pump and am planning on putting it in the S10 I am converting. Could you post a wiring diagram that non-electricians like myself would understand? Thanks. :)

Bill Yancey
 

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GM Hydroboost for brakes USING MR2 Power Steering EHPS pump

Hello Group I am starting my conversion, and I was wondering since the Gen3 MR2 pump is the best for Power Steering, is it safe to run the brakes off it using a GM hyrdoboost kit?

I'd like to know that this is safe. Here is some information about Hydroboost, this you can find on a 2001 Silverado, most Disels use hydroboost, because the engine has little or no vacuum.

Hydroboost braking systems have been around for a long time. They have been used on many GM truck models and have been used on race cars for years. How does a hydroboost system work? Before I answer that question let me explain how the conventional power brake systems work. Most power brake systems employ a vacuum booster to provide pedal assistance when braking. That large drum attached to your brake cylinder in your engine compartment uses vacuum produced by your engine to help push the plunger in the brake cylinder when you apply pressure on the pedal.​
A hydroboost system uses hydraulic pressure to assist in pushing the plunger in the brake cylinder when you step on the pedal. The hydroboost unit simply replaces the vacuum booster and fits between the firewall and the brake master cylinder. Most hydroboost systems piggy-back on the power steering system for the hydraulic pressure.​
What are the advantages to the hydroboost system? The most noticeable difference is in the braking response and reduced pedal effort. A typical vacuum system depends on your engine for the vacuum source. Once engines are modified, they often do not produce sufficient vacuum to provide the assist necessary and therefore, stopping your car requires more pedal effort on the part of the driver. The hydroboost system is much smaller and frees up space in the engine compartment for things like deeper valve pan covers, etc.​
http://corvettec3.ca/hydro.htm]
 

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I have yet to get my MR2 pump to work correctly, but I wold like to see this work, if I can get it to work. Main question might be the pressure differences between the two systems.
 

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From what I gather which isn't much... is that, the GM Hydroboost requires 800-1200 psi, and the MR2 power steering pump is at 2000 psi @ 40 amps.

Can somebody verify this?

Now I am aware with the 3rd Gen P/S pump when you don't turn the steering wheel, the pump will not turn on... Will this be the same for the brakes? The hydroboost, has about 3 brakes before it will require a pump, but lets assume just one brake...
[I think another thread should be started on this topic - I'm just a newbie]
 

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Re: GM Hydroboost for brakes USING MR2 Power Steering EHPS pump

Hello Group I am starting my conversion, and I was wondering since the Gen3 MR2 pump is the best for Power Steering, is it safe to run the brakes off it using a GM hyrdoboost kit?
How do you measure safe? For me I think that is a hard question to answer. Since a failure at the pump still doesn't keep the car from stopping so not sure I would consider it a saftey question? However...

Does it work? I can answer that. In my conversion I am using a hydroboost from a mustang and a later model MR2 pump. Works great. People that have driven the car have actually been disapointed as it drives like a regular car. (the expect a EV to drive differently or somethign) I have the MR2 pump plumbed also into the power steering and hydroboost. Steering and braking feel is not noticably different from my ICE car.

I'll add this. The pump does make noise and mine is running all the time the key is on. When I brake hard it loads the pump a noticable amount. I'm considering having a shut down circuit or something so it turns off when not moving or something. I just love dead scilence when sitting still. When moving I don't notice the sound due to road noise etc.

Thaniel.
 

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Now I am aware with the 3rd Gen P/S pump when you don't turn the steering wheel, the pump will not turn on...
That is from the circuitry in the MR2. If you don't have or wire in such sensors and circuitry well....
 

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Your suggesting the vss signal from the car has to be hooked up to the gen 3 p/s pump. For my first build, I am going to abandon this idea of using the hydroboost, a vacuum pump should be sufficient.
 

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I'm not doing an electric car conversion, but I wanted to let the OP know that this is great info! I have Nissan with an ICE and a large turbo. I had to remove the power steering to fit the turbo and wanted my PS back. I stumbled upon this site during my research. I've looked into many other EHPS setups, and IMHO, the 3rd Gen Spyder is the best setup. The Volvo unit is a little easier to wire, but doesn't give you the speed sensitive steering like the Toyota does.

To answer some questions, you don't need the ECU wired in for it to work. The 2 wires connected to the ECU serve 2 purposes. The IDUP line stands for "Idle Up". This is basically a signal sent to the ECU to tell it that the pump is going to pull a large electrical load on the system and to increase the idle to compensate. The EFI signal is sent from the ECU to tell the EHPS system that the motor is running and that the EHPS system can be activated. With your electric cars, this wouldn't really be needed unless you wanted to wire it up so that the EHPS was deactivated if you had the key in the ACC position so that your battery consumption would be a little lower. IIRC this wire is brought low to de-activate the EHPS, and then high to enable it. Because I have an ICE vehicle with a standalon EMS, I'll be using this wire so that the system doesn't run with the engine off.

The last 3 wires, SIL, TC, TS, are all for OBD signal transmission and aren't needed. You also don't need to hook up WL (Warning Lamp), but it's not hard to do, and will flash a code if there is a failure in the system.

I hope this helps, and thanks again for the info!
 

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I'm not doing an electric car conversion, but I wanted to let the OP know that this is great info! I have Nissan with an ICE and a large turbo. I had to remove the power steering to fit the turbo and wanted my PS back. I stumbled upon this site during my research. I've looked into many other EHPS setups, and IMHO, the 3rd Gen Spyder is the best setup. The Volvo unit is a little easier to wire, but doesn't give you the speed sensitive steering like the Toyota does.

To answer some questions, you don't need the ECU wired in for it to work. The 2 wires connected to the ECU serve 2 purposes. The IDUP line stands for "Idle Up". This is basically a signal sent to the ECU to tell it that the pump is going to pull a large electrical load on the system and to increase the idle to compensate. The EFI signal is sent from the ECU to tell the EHPS system that the motor is running and that the EHPS system can be activated. With your electric cars, this wouldn't really be needed unless you wanted to wire it up so that the EHPS was deactivated if you had the key in the ACC position so that your battery consumption would be a little lower. IIRC this wire is brought low to de-activate the EHPS, and then high to enable it. Because I have an ICE vehicle with a standalon EMS, I'll be using this wire so that the system doesn't run with the engine off.

The last 3 wires, SIL, TC, TS, are all for OBD signal transmission and aren't needed. You also don't need to hook up WL (Warning Lamp), but it's not hard to do, and will flash a code if there is a failure in the system.

I hope this helps, and thanks again for the info!
We are in the same boat.

I have a Turbo as well and trying to get as much clearance as I can.
I have running the old MR2 Steering pump (1991-1995), which is way more complicated then the spyder (2000-2005).
I have almost 7 months with the system and I am very satisfy, I hooked it up with the ECU, Driver and Steering Sensor, which it makes it kind of quite and will shots off when there is no signal from the Steering Sensor nor the Speed Sensor, It short OFF as well when hits 80mph.
The ECU went off a couple of months ago, But because I have it all hooked up with the warning light, I checked the codes and was very easy to find the problem.
I looked at this thread long time ago and I am thinking on upgrading my old pump.
Now that you jump in and give more Information about what all the rest of the wiring does, I might considering on doing the upgrade.
I really would like to get as more info about the spyder pump to be able to hook it up the way it came from factory.

However, I am a little confused on the wiring diagram.
On my old system it has only two wires for the Warning light, which in the spyder has four wires.

WL (4-C W) is current from the ECU, to the Warning Light.
14-B W-B (Warning Light) is ground for the Warning Light.

Now how about the other 2 wires?.
I am lost at this spot.

7.5 Fuse from the Gauge (10-B W-B) Warning Light?. Is this from the ACC, Ignition Switch or Accessory?.
(12-A) color W-B?. All what I know I'ts ground, which that makes it easy to hook up with out knowing what is it for.:D

Do the Spyder Warning light has 4 outlets?, I thought it was just 2, ground and current, which is all what the Warning light needs to light up.

If the Spyder warning light has 4 wires, Then I need the Spyder Warning light as well to mount it on my cluster.

Any one who can shine my Day would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Miguel.
 
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