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I just bought a second hand TCI built circle track glide for $250. I plan to couple it to an AC50. It uses a coupler and no flex plate or t/c. I will keep you updated as to how it works.
 

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Sorry for the late reply. I had forgotten this thread....



Adapter kit and coupler



AC50 + Glide




in the car




External pump


To date I have not driven it but the 150PSI pump puts it in low gear easily. It is turned on by my foot on the brake pedal. I am not using a pressure switch.

It is a TCI full manual oval-track glide. I had to replace the speedo gears and "bullet" as they were removed for racing.

BTW: the adapter uses the GM Crate engine (later small block) crankshaft flange pattern. The coupler can be bought early or late patterns to suit your adapter. ALSO: I had to play with (shorten) the input shaft and coupler length to get my 1/16" end play to assure the front pump was not end loaded and fail.



Miz
 

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John: A 1963 Pontiac Tempest also Had a rear transaxle, some were powerglides. The motor was in the front and drove it with a very small/rigid driveshaft.

Also some Porches were front engine with a rear transaxle.

Just a thought.

Miz
 

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UPDATE:

A manual shift/direct drive powerglide works in an EV really well! I have gotten about 100 miles on mine at this writing.

It weighs 75 lbs.- my T-5 manual weighed 88 Lbs. (plus clutch/flywheel/linkage)

Things I have discovered:

1-They are easy to work with and on.
2-They can not be "idled" when a direct drive coupler is used.
3-Mine ran 170 deg. F. after an hour driving in 109 Deg. F. temps.
4-It works with Regen braking just fine. The clutch/band stays locked all the way down to zero shaft speed.(then a 2-3 second delay until it drops pressure and goes to neutral.)
5-I used a 140 PSI pump, but you might get by with 80 Lbs or so.
6- For EV use, do NOT use Kevlar in the frictions. You can really use the stock-factory parts OR use the RED or BLUE racing friction parts. Kevlar only accelerates wear because it is aggressive.
7-Do NOT use an aluminum front drum, the low band wears them fast.
8-DO use a steel front hub.
9-DO use the rear clutch case savers (made for trans brake duty). It is just good sense and stops case wear for the reverse clutches.
10-DO remove reverse clutches. Run 2 on a light car(2500# or less), run 3 on all others. It reduces friction,wear, heat while in forward gears.
11-There are several small holes to drill out to increase oil flow to critical areas. Get a book.
12-No need to change to a turbo type input shaft for strength.
13-you can eliminate the "kick down" lever and rod, as you dont want a "passing gear drop down when driving an EV."
14-Always loop the cooler circuit. It lubricates a less critical portion of the transmission that the main pressure gallery omits. Only eliminate the loop if you are changing the valve body or really know what you are doing.
15-There is not a single port to supply to both forward and reverse from an external pump. I am plumbed into the low band apply servo cover. I do not have pressure in reverse and must apply throttle a little until it clunks into gear...annoying for sure.

I need to rebuild my Glide this winter and will search for the correct place to pressurise the trans to have both forward and reverse gearing.

Those "air cooled" powerglides may be a better choice for an EV, especially if you are direct coupled. The torque converter makes 80% of the transmission heat. The low gear planetary makes most of the rest.

I like the 1.85 gearing for my purposes. It is lighter duty than the 1.72 version, but my usage is way with in the GM normal standards.

All the 4 and 6 cylinder applications and some of the 283 cars are 1.85 gearing. All the 327 and up V-8 applications are 1.72 gearing.

They can be told externally by the output shaft splines and the shaft diameter is smaller in the 1.85 versions...but they both use the same output yoke....go figure...

In my area, on Craigslist, I routinely find powerglides for $150-$400 or so, depending on the condition or if it was recently rebuilt.

More when I go into the trans....Miz
 

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Kansas EV has a nice unit. There is a small time delay getting one and a large cost. This is mine, I have less than $500 in it.



Direct drive



With an external pump


Miz
 

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DISCLAIMER: I am not discussing vehicle current draw, just vehicle driveability.

Ron brings up a critical point.

Pretty much all vehicles are dependent on the motor's top rpm and the car's final drive ratio.

As Ron said- My 2,000# car and 32" tire likes a 6.14 gear and the AC50's top RPM (6500+). It works by having a 2,000# car and the RPM to give a good top speed.

A powerglide will also work on a torque brute like the Warp 11 or 13, in a similar car. When they are geared for their top RPM the final drive works out to be a shorter 3.55-4.10 (depending on tire size). This combination works by having enough torque to cover the bottom end.

The powerglide would be a poor choice for a smaller motor (AC or DC), or a heavy vehicle (3,500 Lbs and up) or hilly country if you want a top speed over 40 MPH.

Heavy haul trucks have an 18 speed transmission for a reason. To suit the motor torque to the hill and vehicle weight. Electric power is a lot like Diesel power, it has good torque over a narrow RPM band. Gear accordingly or you will be disappointed.

Ivansgarage is building a GMC Sonoma. He is using the original 4L60E transmission. It will work nicely in the truck which will be 3,500Lbs and up in weight. It is still converterless and retains the automatic shift features.



The water cooled AC motor being mocked up with the 4L60E transmission.

The motor specs are not public yet, but it is about 1/3 over an AC50 in torque. This and the 4 speeds will make this a really nice driving combination.

You can kill a nice install by "cheap skating" the gearing. (Trying to make do with what is in the vehicle.)

Everything is in the gearing for your situation.
 
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