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Discussion Starter #1
Label says: Desc. PD18MHV3.0A
and
Part number P6280068

400 VAC
65kw

I bought this at auction with high hopes of doing a cool project with it but really I am in over my head.
Its around 120 lbs and very bulky. I will not ship.

$1,200 O/B/O

I don't know 100% that it works but it seems like it is in good shape and hardly used. An aluminum adapter plate seems to be bolted to the face. It is liquid cooled, AC 3 phase and heavy duty! Made specifically for Makani, an ex-google ex-shell wind generation company.

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These motors are very well engineered in-wheel axial flux motors, rated at 1250 Nm of torgue.
Yeah, that's 792 foot pounds.
That probably sounds like a lot to most people, but for comparison an early Nissan Leaf motor puts out 320 Nm and is geared 7.94:1, for 2541 Nm to the wheels, so two of these Protean motors produce the same force driving the vehicle (given the same tire diameter) as an early Leaf... and later Leafs and everything else in production have more.

Excellent reference! :)

While I'm not a fan of in-wheel motors, I applaud Protean for this very clear and usefully informative documentation.

Whoever buys it probably will want (at least) two.
Yes, if someone is doing a vehicle and it is anything other than a rear-wheel-drive "tadpole" trike, they would likely need two, and for good performance AWD would be both desirable and good way to take advantage of the in-wheel motor packaging.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Perhaps make an adapter that hooks it up to the input shaft of the trans and use as an engine replacement.
Not the intended application but it should work.
 

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Perhaps make an adapter that hooks it up to the input shaft of the trans and use as an engine replacement.
Not the intended application but it should work.
That would be awkward: it's an in-wheel motor with a rotating case, supported on one side (the hub carrier, so in this sort of application the case would be awkwardly spinning.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
no, hub and associated wires would be stationary, the "brake drum" parts spins and interfaces to the trans pilot shaft. Yes, visible motor bits would be spinning, like the belts and pullies of an ICE car. Maybe its nostalgic ;-)
 

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no, hub and associated wires would be stationary, the "brake drum" parts spins and interfaces to the trans pilot shaft. Yes, visible motor bits would be spinning, like the belts and pullies of an ICE car. Maybe its nostalgic ;-)
As I said, only the hub (and the bundle of cables coming out of it) would be stationary - everything else you see (which does look like a brake drum and backing plate) spins. Compared to a engine, it's like having just the pulleys stationary and the entire engine spinning (there were actually engines like that on aircraft and in a few cars over 100 years ago, called rotaries). There would be nothing to bolt the transmission case to, so you would need to build a structure for that.

It might be amusing for a street rod with no hood... but seriously, it belongs inside a wheel or behind a propeller.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I think i overestimated the weight. Datasheet says 36 kg, which is around 80 lbs. With the bracket on it perhaps it is more. All I know is I am barely able to lift it, and was not about to try to get it into the frunk of my Tesla without help.
 
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