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2007 Proton Jumbuck GLi running Nissan eNV200 Gear
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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
So now I have most of the front end pulled off.

So many 10mm nuts, so many plastic clips!

 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Ready to pull the motor tomorrow!

So happy!

 
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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Motor is "out"

123290
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Now the motor is actually out:

 
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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Congrats on getting it out!

A cable Come Along (or "Hoist Puller") would have helped there. Lots of control and more oomph than the mower. Can't argue with results though!
View attachment 123293
Oh 100% it would have been easier to use a come along.

However I got there, and hopefully I can lift it with the crane, stick it on the dollies like I did the battery, and it'll be easy to wheel into place under the other car soon.

Then hopefully I can have it all sitting at the right heights and get her bolted up.

I'm standing here looking at it and I can't Bieber how close the K-Frames are.

The Proton was built in Malaysia in 2007 off early 90's Mitsubishi stampings, and the Nissan was built in 2014 by Nissan.

Yet so many things are so close!
 
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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
So I found out that the Jumbuck Strut Tops fit onto the Nissan Struts perfectly!


And my CAD model is finished printing and I now have it test sat into place for the Dash:

123304


 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
So the motor is ready to roll into position!

 
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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
So I was able to get the motor into place:

 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
I have also done a test fit of the motor for sizing:

 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
And for todays exercise, I have shown my workflow for creating the adaptor plate, I'm not sure if I quire like this yet, but we'll see how it goes.

 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
And for todays exercise, I have shown my workflow for creating the adaptor plate, I'm not sure if I quire like this yet, but we'll see how it goes.

So I decided after much chopping and changing that building that plate alone out of 3mm or 5mm would be excessively hard to bend up and shape and be super heavy.

So I changed up the design to use 2.5mm plate which is cheaper and easier to bend and added a heap of inserts to it, and some nice beefy 50mm tubing to make up the rest of the load carrying.

This way load is more evenly distributed, and although I drop below a factor of 1 on the stress test, those parts will actually be seam welded, so the load is actually not going to find hard corners, instead it's going to find a lot of welded edges to take the strain.

Thankfully I know a few structural welders.

 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Okz so it was time to do the CAD for the CAD of the rear motor mount.

So Cardboard Aided Design assisting computer Aided Design

 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
So I 3D printed my motor mounts!

 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
REALLY REALLY BIG PROGRESS THIS WEEK!!!!

So I have the design for a rear subframe nailed down, and I have decided that my best way forward will be to flip the eNV200 Battery Upside Down.

I am going with Independent Trailer Suspension similar to this:

Which ends up giving me this:
Auto part Electronic device Automotive exterior Electronics accessory Font

Table Wood Rectangle Toy Font

Toy Automotive wheel system Auto part Machine Automotive exterior

Product Rectangle Automotive exterior Font Auto part

Beam Engineering Metal Auto part Wood


Now that CAD file I have for the independent suspension isn't great, so it's not entirely accurate beyond the mounting points.

However I have it off to the engineer, and he's all over it like a fat kid on a cupcake, really excited for the build.

So next week I should know what I need to do from here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
So a lot of people on Reddit commented that the Suspension doesn't look real, doesn't look like it would work, and so on and so forth.

So...updated Suspension.

Arm Human body Lego Machine Font

Lego Machine Toy Auto part Plastic

Tire Font Automotive exterior Toy Rectangle

Surveillance camera Camera Cameras & optics Camera accessory Font

Product Motor vehicle Lego Automotive tire Automotive exterior


Everything is now in there very tight, very close, but it all fits.

Just.
 

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So a lot of people on Reddit commented that the Suspension doesn't look real, doesn't look like it would work, and so on and so forth.
Comments like that are strange, given that this is a simple straightforward trailing arm design, and in details is nearly identical to some production suspensions (typically in Australian off-road-capable camping and travel trailers).

As with those trailers, the shock absorber mounting angle is poor - that may be the source of some "won't work" comments. If the isn't room to mount them vertically outside of the frame, it would be preferable to at least angle them forward so they have a rising rate of travel rather than falling.

An issue with any trailing arm suspension is the adverse effect on toe of lateral force in cornering; that's why this design is now rarely used in production cars. Without a compensation from linking the arms on a twisting beam at the pivot, the remaining approach to improving this is to make them slightly semi-trailing: the pivot axis should be angled off of purely lateral by placing the inner pivot slightly rearward of the outer pivot (and aligned with each other, of course).
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Comments like that are strange, given that this is a simple straightforward trailing arm design, and in details is nearly identical to some production suspensions (typically in Australian off-road-capable camping and travel trailers).
Yeah well that's where I got the idea, as an Australian, I see these on trailers all the time, it's super common to me.

As with those trailers, the shock absorber mounting angle is poor - that may be the source of some "won't work" comments. If the isn't room to mount them vertically outside of the frame, it would be preferable to at least angle them forward so they have a rising rate of travel rather than falling.
Yeah that could be an option to me, absolutely, I'm just concerned about restricting the travel of the trailing arm is all, as there is very little room under the car.

An issue with any trailing arm suspension is the adverse effect on toe of lateral force in cornering; that's why this design is now rarely used in production cars. Without a compensation from linking the arms on a twisting beam at the pivot, the remaining approach to improving this is to make them slightly semi-trailing: the pivot axis should be angled off of purely lateral by placing the inner pivot slightly rearward of the outer pivot (and aligned with each other, of course).
One option I've seen is that being 50x50x5 box, some people are inserting a 40x40x5 box through the centre going full width, and also welding a 50x50x5 box between then, essentially making it a trailing solid axle.

When I have a few hours I could CAD it up, but essentially joining the two arms at the trailing edge.

Why people do this on trailers, I'm not exactly sure, but I've seen it on car trailers, likely because the loads vary and they want a "predictable" system.
 
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