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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I want to start an EV conversion on our 1987 Nissan Patrol.

But charging is just a blur to me, I get that home chargers use the connector of your choosing, but can I just buy a certain plug, and a charger off of evshop.eu (which I found to be a supplier in Europe) and plug it in at (for example,) my local grocery store? Are all plugs universal In the Netherlands? (And if that's the case, Europe aswell I'd guess).

And what's the deal with the speed of charging? I looked on chargemap.com, but it has different speeds and charging capabilities. Are all of these AC chargers? Or are some like the Tesla superchargers, where they have the charger in the post, and just discharge a bunch of DC straight into your battery?

Thanks for the help!
 

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It would probably be worth reading a reasonable overview of EV charging systems. You could try the Wikipedia page for Charging Stations, although it's not ideal.

AC charging means getting AC power (120 V or 240 V) from the charging station, which is converted to battery voltage by the car's onboard charger. Power is limited by the circuit supplying the charging station, and the onboard charger. Home chargers are almost all AC.

DC charging means getting DC power at battery voltage from the charging station, so the charging station does the conversion from AC and the control of voltage. Power is limited by the circuit supplying the charging station, the charger in the charging station, and the ability of the car's battery to accept charge. "Fast" chargers are DC.

In any case, control equipment in the car communicates with the charging station to determine the power (and voltage, if DC) which is suitable. That means that the car and charging station need both a compatible connector (there are several styles) and systems supporting the same communication protocol.

Any reasonable charging system map lets you select which connectors you can use and shows the mode (AC or DC) and power (if DC) of charging available. I believe that most charging stations in Europe of the same level are compatible ("Type 2" for AC, "CCS Combo EU" for AC and DC), but you can check that out by using their "Search" feature to filter for the various . Their mobile app lets you do the usual filtering as well. Chargemap is really only interested in selling you a pass to use with the charging stations in their system. In the chargemap legend, the "Standard" power is AC, "Fast" is DC, and I don't know what's going on in-between.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It would probably be worth reading a reasonable overview of EV charging systems. You could try the Wikipedia page for Charging Stations, although it's not ideal.

AC charging means getting AC power (120 V or 240 V) from the charging station, which is converted to battery voltage by the car's onboard charger. Power is limited by the circuit supplying the charging station, and the onboard charger. Home chargers are almost all AC.

DC charging means getting DC power at battery voltage from the charging station, so the charging station does the conversion from AC and the control of voltage. Power is limited by the circuit supplying the charging station, the charger in the charging station, and the ability of the car's battery to accept charge. "Fast" chargers are DC.

In any case, control equipment in the car communicates with the charging station to determine the power (and voltage, if DC) which is suitable. That means that the car and charging station need both a compatible connector (there are several styles) and systems supporting the same communication protocol.

Any reasonable charging system map lets you select which connectors you can use and shows the mode (AC or DC) and power (if DC) of charging available. I believe that most charging stations in Europe of the same level are compatible ("Type 2" for AC, "CCS Combo EU" for AC and DC), but you can check that out by using their "Search" feature to filter for the various . Their mobile app lets you do the usual filtering as well. Chargemap is really only interested in selling you a pass to use with the charging stations in their system. In the chargemap legend, the "Standard" power is AC, "Fast" is DC, and I don't know what's going on in-between.
Thanks, how can I tell what chargers support DC and AC? I presume that some must have the functionality built in, eventhough it doesn't use the AC to DC conversion in the charger.
 

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Hi, I want to start an EV conversion on our 1987 Nissan Patrol.

But charging is just a blur to me, I get that home chargers use the connector of your choosing, but can I just buy a certain plug, and a charger off of evshop.eu (which I found to be a supplier in Europe) and plug it in at (for example,) my local grocery store? Are all plugs universal In the Netherlands? (And if that's the case, Europe aswell I'd guess).

And what's the deal with the speed of charging? I looked on chargemap.com, but it has different speeds and charging capabilities. Are all of these AC chargers? Or are some like the Tesla superchargers, where they have the charger in the post, and just discharge a bunch of DC straight into your battery?

Thanks for the help!
Converting ICE to EV is one thing, getting it road legal and registered as an EV is almost certain not possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Converting ICE to EV is one thing, getting it road legal and registered as an EV is almost certain not possible.
Yeah, we're looking into that, I think if we get a certified drivetrain it only requires an RDW check.
 

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can I just buy a certain plug, and a charger off of evshop.eu (which I found to be a supplier in Europe) and plug it in at (for example,) my local grocery store? Are all plugs universal In the Netherlands? (And if that's the case, Europe aswell I'd guess).

...... and just discharge a bunch of DC straight into your battery?

Thanks for the help!
Let's start with the DC. Bottomline is, yes, the offboard charger does the AC to DC conversion and DC goes straight into your car. Getting there is a different story though. There are two approaches, CHAdeMO and CCS. For CHAdeMO there are already some DIY solutions available. However, CCS is going to be the leading standard. Unfortunately that is much more difficult to implement. There is one DIY project that has it up and running that I am aware of and there are several initiatives to get this working. I am involved in one of those.

AC is much more straightforward. Bottomline is that a (or multiple) onboard chargers need (in NL) 220V and convert that to DC in your car.
Way forward in my opinion is Type 2, Mode 3.
Most simple approach is to use an AVC2 https://evwest.com/support/avc2_instructions.pdf
If you want more "intelligence" then I can recommend the Thunderstruck EVCC Chargers :: EVCC (Charge Controller)
Myself I am working on an even more dynamic module, the ChargeLink that bridges between BMS, Charging station and charger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Let's start with the DC. Bottomline is, yes, the offboard charger does the AC to DC conversion and DC goes straight into your car. Getting there is a different story though. There are two approaches, CHAdeMO and CCS. For CHAdeMO there are already some DIY solutions available. However, CCS is going to be the leading standard. Unfortunately that is much more difficult to implement. There is one DIY project that has it up and running that I am aware of and there are several initiatives to get this working. I am involved in one of those.

AC is much more straightforward. Bottomline is that a (or multiple) onboard chargers need (in NL) 220V and convert that to DC in your car.
Way forward in my opinion is Type 2, Mode 3.
Most simple approach is to use an AVC2 https://evwest.com/support/avc2_instructions.pdf
If you want more "intelligence" then I can recommend the Thunderstruck EVCC Chargers :: EVCC (Charge Controller)
Myself I am working on an even more dynamic module, the ChargeLink that bridges between BMS, Charging station and charger.
Thanks!
So if I get a TC 3.3KW charger for now, until I expand my battery pack to >200V, it will work on its own for AC charging at 3,3KW?
 

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Thanks!
So if I get a TC 3.3KW charger for now, until I expand my battery pack to >200V, it will work on its own for AC charging at 3,3KW?
Depends on what you mean by "on it's own" :)
You need a BMS going into charge mode and if you want to use mode 3, you need to interact with the charging station.
But shortcuts are possible (would not recommend them and not allowed by RDW) and you can juist power the charger using a Schuko plug.
You also need to think about the mandatory driveaway protection.
I see you are from NL too, feel free do send me an e-mail or give me a call for some "quickstart" tips. Contact details can be found on my (new/work in progress) site www.evcreate.nl.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Depends on what you mean by "on it's own" :)
You need a BMS going into charge mode and if you want to use mode 3, you need to interact with the charging station.
But shortcuts are possible (would not recommend them and not allowed by RDW) and you can juist power the charger using a Schuko plug.
You also need to think about the mandatory driveaway protection.
I see you are from NL too, feel free do send me an e-mail or give me a call for some "quickstart" tips. Contact details can be found on my (new/work in progress) site www.evcreate.nl.
I mean, if I get a TC 3,3KWH charger, can I hook it up to a type 2 plug (not going with DC for now because it's too complex) and plug it in at any station? Or do I need some kind of controller or something to talk to charge stations I'm plugging in to?
 

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Yes, you need something to talk to the charging stations. They don't just provide juice when you insert a cable like a home outlet does.
That "some kind of controller" are the three options I mentioned above (AVC2, EVCC, ChargeLink).
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes, you need something to talk to the charging stations. They don't just provide juice when you insert a cable like a home outlet does.
That "some kind of controller" are the three options I mentioned above (AVC2, EVCC, ChargeLink).
I see! Thanks for the help!
 
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