DIY Electric Car Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, everyone, I'm Ulli and I'm from Germany.

I use this thread directly to introduce myself and also need your help directly.
Normally I'm into fast bmw and old trucks. For a couple of years I have enjoyed restoring old trucks. i randomly came across a first gen mustang that was converted to electric and weirdly i thought it was super cool. It actually completely contradicts my attitude but I really want to do it myself now.

I already have an offer for a '66 Mustang without engine and transmission.
Now to my questions.
Of course, I want to keep the whole Project as cheap as possible, but it should also be useable. The battery capacity may only last for 60miles (100km) to start with to save money. Since the Mustang shouldn't be weaker or slower than with the original engine, I planned to install a Tesla engine. After a few days of googling, I found the best price/performance ratio for the Tesla Motors. All retrofit engines are much more expensive and have less power. the Problem I have is that the mustang has a solid rear axle so I can't install the tesla motor instead of the differential, so I would have to install the whole subframe of the Tesla. As an example, a German online shop has a retrofit motor with 51kw and 220Nm of torque for $6000. A used tesla motor from 2018 with 220kw and much more torque costs 2000$. Is my basic idea wrong that I try to achieve the original Mustang engine specs with an electric motor? what could you recommend me for another engine that also achieves a sporty driving style with the mustang?

Many thanks for your help.
Ulli
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Welcome. I think there is a Mustang thread or two here already.

Your combination of things doesn't really work so well; a cheap, powerful DIY EV isn't a thing yet. IMO start with 10k per year for as long as project takes as a base budget. Simpler setups can be done in a couple of years, harder projects like fitting a Tesla DU can take a few more. Have a look at how long some of the build threads here are.

The Tesla back end can be fitted but it is very wide, even the 3 is a couple of inches wider than a lot of older cars. You also get stuck with very few wheel options since they need 40mm positive offset and have to fit over the OEM brakes so 19" which look kind of silly on old cars. An S rear is 9" a side wider than a 57 Chevy so none of the subframe can be used, plus the control arms go through the Chevy frame rails and there is no place to put the shocks, I'd imagine a blue-badge will be much the same. But it can be done if you are up for a challenge. Other options are to fit the Tesla motor into where the transmission is, I think somebody has done a gear reduction adapter kit but you can probably buy a used Leaf or two for the price of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey 57Chevy,

Thanks for that Info.

I agree that it's easier to leave the axle as it is and put the engine in the front. Unfortunately, as you say, it is so that the tesla drives already have a gearbox installed and so there would be a double reduction. The easiest way would be to take a retrofit engine, unfortunately these are extremely expensive for a fraction of the performance of the tesla engines.
Do I have to refer to the Mustang combustion engine specs for an electric motor in order to be able to move it in a normal or sporty way? maybe I can use the tesla engine without its gearbox and flange it to the cardan shaft instead of the combustion engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
OK I think I found a Solution to use the Tesla motor with the original rear axle.
With the Model 3 motor, the first gear stage can be used as an output shaft by removing the Inverter and the Differential. The Inverter must then be relocated somewhere else and connected to the Motor via Cables. The Gear Cover of the Motor even has an opening on the Shaft. So I would have to build an Ddapter that fits into the shank of the shaft of gear stage 2 in order to connect it directly to the cardan shaft. Gear stage 2 has a gear reduction of 2.5, which would be like the 2nd gear of a manual Gearbox.




does that sound plausible?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,096 Posts
Tesla requires a lot of slicing and dicing of your long-nosed Ford Falcon.

I think you should consider using a Leaf motor and either a standard transmission (you don't say if car was an automatic transmission) or something like a Torquebox, to run the driveshaft to keep the rear axle the same. A beefier rear axle from a 68 or 69 Mustang will fit, which opens up the option for deeper rear end gears for acceleration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
does that sound plausible?
That is the general gist of it. Use one stage reduction from the Tesla transmission and use the second reduction from the vehicle differential. This won't be a cheap option though, you'll either have to make it yourself or buy one somebody has made.

A Leaf motor on the OEM manual transmission is a cheaper option, you only have to fab an adapter plate and some mounts. Couple it with a Leaf battery and you have a relatively cheap option once you figure out the software/firmware side. How much can you get a three-legged Leaf for? It won't be tire-frying powerful, but it'll do ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you for the tips.

Unfortunately, a Leaf engine is out of the question because first of all I don't have a Gearbox and I'm afraid that after the huge conversion the performance will not be enough and I'm dissatisfied.

The way I see it, I have 3 options

1. rebuild the rear axle so that i can get the tesla motor between the wheels. either with a bmw e36 axle or something else.

2. convert the tesla motor to a cardan shaft output using the 2nd gear stage. and build the Motor in the engine compartment and connect it to the original rear axle with a cardan shaft

3. use a crate motor like the hyper 9. but I'm really unsure whether the performance is enough to have fun.

Fabrication is not a problem for me I have all the machines and knowledge to make all sorts of adaptations. I therefore tend towards option 1 or 2.

what is of course really annoying is that the controllers for the teslka motors are so damn expensive. meanwhile i'm leaning towards the small drive unit.

Unfortunately, we have strict rules in Germany when it comes to cars, so I would like to present the project to our safety inspectors this week, let's see what they think of it.

I will keep you up to date.


greetings Ulli
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,096 Posts
This obsession with Tesla motors 🤦‍♂️ Their constant power rating is crap....they overheat after two laps on a track.

Pretty much any EV motor will outdo what was available in a 1966 Mustang:

"The Windsor Hi-Po V8 used a four-barreled carburetor to supply a whopping 271 bhp and 312 [ft] lb [that's peak torque, starting from zero ft lb & engine wound up to likely 4000 rpm] of torque. It was the most powerful engine option for the Mustang from 1964 to 1966." - shelby-news.com

Meanwhile, the Leaf produces 236 ft lb of torque from zero RPM in factory trim. Use a decent inverter, and go with deep rear end gears, and there's no reason it can't make 300 ft lb...FROM zero km/h.

A standard transmission for a Mustang and a Leaf motor will cost you about half that of a Tesla and no futzing with the craptastic unibody construction that is, for all intents and purposes, a Ford Falcon that came out in its inaugural year with a 144 cu in straight six.

A standard transmission gives you the ability to put your eyeballs into the back of your head (the Leaf revs to over 10,000rpm) during 0-100km/h pulls or to cruise on the Autobahn without crazy RPM from the motor.

Your project, just that a Tesla DU seems like a foolish choice for a car that came from the factory with leaf springs, folded tin unibody, and the handling of an Amish buggy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
What you are describing is a $50k project. If you want a powerful motor then you need a powerful battery to feed it so that rules out most cheaper options right away. The controllers for LDUs aren't expensive in the bigger picture, $2800USD will get you an automotive grade VCU and a control board for the inverter. I personally wouldn't want a Leaf powered Mustang either, it'll be a good EV but it won't be brutal. Revisit ya budget and build a beast out of it IMO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You're right, I found out a little bit about the Hyper 9 and the Nissan Leaf Motor. I'm actually impressed by the specs of the Leaf Motor, plus the fact that it can "easily" be coupled to a manual gearbox via an adapter plate.

I was actually blind and only saw all the videos on youtube where everyone does a tesla swap.

There are even really affordable kits with Leaf motor, controller, Leaf battery etc.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top