DIY Electric Car Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello:

Hoping to control costs on one hand.

On other hand, hoping for minimum of 30 mile (48 kilometer) range with 70 miles per hour (112 kph) freeway speed after charging vehicle up each night on 110 or 220 volt 60 hertz alternating electrical current.

My skill level with auto mechanics and fabrication is that I have, on my own, changed engine oil and filter, spark plugs, wires, and rotors, alternators, brake pads, one rack and pinion steering system for a Toyota pickup truck, removed and reinstalled radiators for service by radiator shop, and changed a catalytic converter under supervision from a self employed road side mechanic I have employed. I have never removed, disassembled, reassembled, or installed and engine or transmission on my own. Have no intention of doing this conversion on my own.

The range I am hoping to get is a minimum of 30 mile (48 kilometer) range with 70 miles per hour (112 kph) freeway speed after charging vehicle up each night on 110 or 220 volt 60 hertz alternating electrical current.

The amount money I am willing to put into my project in none now because I do not have it now. Just trying to get an amount to strive for a this time.

The parts I already already considered at this time, in terms of type, make, model, etc., are none because I have to learn about those first. Guessing I need to consider electric motors, batteries - where to install this, wiring, that which replaces the trans axle, components for charging the batter over night, and that is all I have considered so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,970 Posts
If "overnight" is effectively 8 hours at 1500 watts, that's about 12 kWh maximum to achieve your target range. That's reasonable, given a target of only 48 km. This would imply a battery with about the capacity of some common plug-in hybrids, and a battery could be salvaged from one of those (although that's certainly not the only option).

If it's a three-speed, it must be an automatic. That is poorly suited to use with an electric motor, so consider swapping that for a manual, or not using the Corolla transaxle at all an instead using the transaxle which comes with a motor salvaged from a production EV (the Nissan Leaf is most common for this).

Unfortunately, the cost of paying someone else to do the conversion would be high - in practical terms, it would probably make more sense to just buy a used EV (such as a Nissan Leaf) or plug-in hybrid (such as a Chevrolet Volt).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If "overnight" is effectively 8 hours at 1500 watts, that's about 12 kWh maximum to achieve your target range. That's reasonable, given a target of only 48 km. This would imply a battery with about the capacity of some common plug-in hybrids, and a battery could be salvaged from one of those (although that's certainly not the only option).

If it's a three-speed, it must be an automatic. That is poorly suited to use with an electric motor, so consider swapping that for a manual, or not using the Corolla transaxle at all an instead using the transaxle which comes with a motor salvaged from a production EV (the Nissan Leaf is most common for this).

Unfortunately, the cost of paying someone else to do the conversion would be high - in practical terms, it would probably make more sense to just buy a used EV (such as a Nissan Leaf) or plug-in hybrid (such as a Chevrolet Volt).
Brian, thank you very much. Looks like you are helping me to avoid that which is better to be avoided. Had crossed my mind to trade out automatic trans axle. In your opinion, could this conversion be feasible if I were able to do all the work myself or still more economical to just buy a used Nissan Leaf or other production EV?
 

·
Registered
1996 Toyota Land Cruiser
Joined
·
497 Posts
The most cost effective way to do a conversion IMO is to get a salvaged Nissan Leaf for $2000-4000 and buy a Resolve-EV controller for $1000. That includes all the big ticket hardware.

I suggest you install the LEAF motor and transaxle in the front of your car, if it will fit.

No way to convert a car to EV without significant fabrication, either. Even the easiest EV conversion is a large project with lots of downtime for the vehicle and unseen costs and hurdles. That's what makes it fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The most cost effective way to do a conversion IMO is to get a salvaged Nissan Leaf for $2000-4000 and buy a Resolve-EV controller for $1000. That includes all the big ticket hardware.

I suggest you install the LEAF motor and transaxle in the front of your car, if it will fit.

No way to convert a car to EV without significant fabrication, either. Even the easiest EV conversion is a large project with lots of downtime for the vehicle and unseen costs and hurdles. That's what makes it fun!
Electric Land Cruiser: Thank you very much for telling me what I need to hear versus what I was hoping to hear. This beats talking to biased sales people. What is an IMO? See? You are over my head.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top