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Discussion Starter #1
My dog chewed up my plug on my charger. I thought it would be an easy fix. Seems like I need a NEMA 5-15 plug but I don't know what to do with the two little thin wires, can anyone help me? It is the 120v, 12A 60 HZ, 1440 W charger that came with the car 2017. It has 5 wires 3 thick are white, green and black (or dark grey) the two thin wires are light blue and tan. It is a 3 prong straight blade plug. Thank you in advance. I already called Ford and they of course only have a charger and no supporting parts. I looked all over the internet and you tube but couldn't find anything.
 

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As you have already determined, it's hard to imagine that the thicker wires could be anything other than
black -> line pin
white -> neutral pin
green -> ground pin​

Since there are no other pins in a NEMA 5 connector, there only remaining connection which makes sense for the thinner wires is to the line and neutral. Ford might have done this to allow the charger to read voltage at the plug, without voltage drop due to current flow in the thicker wires (which actually supply the charging current). Unfortunately, that's only a reasonable guess, and even if it is right which of the two thinner wires is which is unknown.

If you can open the charger case (without damaging it or causing other issues, such as with warranty coverage), perhaps you can see where the other end of the blue and tan wires go - that might provide a hint, although it's unlikely unless someone has posted internal details of the charger online.
 

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Thinner wires could be connected to a thermistor, that measures plug temperature, or/and some sort of digitally interfacing chip, that stores current limit for a particular plug.
It would be best if you can take apart remainings of the old plug to figure it out. Or at least measure the resistance across the thinner wires that are coming out of the old plug.
 

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It may also be that manufacturer reused the cable, that goes from the charger to the vehicle (where blue and tan wires would be prox and pilot). In that case your 2 wires are not used, just disregard them.

I would suggest to connect the power wires and try to plug it in - it won't blow up - I promise :)
You may get one of these 3:
1) Everything will work normally (which means 2 wires were not used).
2) Charger will work, but in fall-back mode with limited charging current.
3) Charger will not work at all and it will indicate an error.
 

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It would be best if you can take apart remainings of the old plug to figure it out. Or at least measure the resistance across the thinner wires that are coming out of the old plug.
I was assuming, perhaps incorrectly, that the original plug was gone or destroyed. Certainly if you have it, examine it. If the small wires are just connected to pins, and the plug is relatively intact, you can simply test with an ohmmeter to determine the connections.

Thinner wires could be connected to a thermistor, that measures plug temperature, or/and some sort of digitally interfacing chip, that stores current limit for a particular plug.
I had not considered the possibility of an active device in the plug. It's hard for me to imagine any reason for this other than temperature, but a thermistor seems like a remote possibility.

Some EV chargers have a set of plugs to go onto outlets of different current capacities and voltages, so their plugs must identify themselves to the charger. Given the provided specs this is just a 120V 12A charger, so there is presumably only one fixed plug, and no reason to expect any of this complication. Certainly there is no interface to the receptacle (such as that in a fast charging plug) and no handshaking with the power source.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So I very carefully used an exacto knife and weeded out the rubber around the chewed plug so I could find out where the wires went to. Alas, that didn't really help me out with my limited knowledge. What I found was the two little wires didn't go to the any of the prongs. They went to a rubber plug just above the ground wire in the center of the plug. I don't know what that connector? (blue and orange stripe) is. Is that just a connector or is that some type of a resistor? The thin wires are bare about half an inch before they enter that "thing" I took pictures that hopefully explain it better than I can. Thanks!
In the first picture you can see where the rubber that looks like little pincers wrapped around the ground so you know the direction everything was set
 

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Try to connect power wires only and plug it in (don't connect thin wires to anywhere). Let's see how the charger behaves.
Do you have a multimeter? It would be helpful if you can measure resistance across the resistor-like thing.
It can be a thermistor, fixed resistor, junction or a 1-wire digital chip.
 

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How much experience do you have with high voltage electrical circuits and electricity in general? If not much, please don't do anything - it may be very dangerous. Just buy a new charger - they're not expensive (and sell the chewed one off the eBay..).
 
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