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I am looking to repurpose my old 10-30R dryer receptacle and replace it with a 14-30R receptacle. I opened up the existing electrical box and confirmed that there are 4 wires coming from the wall (2 hot, 1 neutral, and 1 bare copper). The ground wire is currently not connected to anything (as one would assume). I presume this will be a relatively simple job, but before I go ahead and wire the new 14-30R receptacle, is there a way to confirm that the ground is indeed a true ground and not tied in to the neutral wire at some point that I can’t visually see? My house was built in 1991 so this was before 14-30R was required by code, however, I am hoping whoever installed the original 10-30R had some foresight and that was the reason a ground wire was also run there.

Wanting to install the new receptacle to charge my Volt. Clipper creek chargers require a ground to function properly which forms the basis for the above question.
 

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... is there a way to confirm that the ground is indeed a true ground and not tied in to the neutral wire at some point that I can’t visually see?
I don't think there's an easy way, because neutral and ground are tied together at the service entrance. You could disconnect the neutral for that circuit at the panel, and see if the ground wire is still grounded (has continuity to a known ground), while the neutral should be floating (no continuity to a known ground).
 

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I don't think there's an easy way, because neutral and ground are tied together at the service entrance. You could disconnect the neutral for that circuit at the panel, and see if the ground wire is still grounded (has continuity to a known ground), while the neutral should be floating (no continuity to a known ground).
That’s a possibility that I could try. Here’s a different question, if the neutral and ground are tied together at the service entrance and I wire up the 14-30R receptacle and plug in my charger, do I need to worry about possibly generating a charge on the car chassis through the neutral wire?
 

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It is the neutral that the Volt evse needs for it's 110v supply, even if you convert it to 240volt.You also need the ground or the evse will detect a ground fault. It is impossible for the evse to ever cause the car chassis to be energized, that's what it prevents, basically. Neutral and ground both go to the same place, but can only be together in the panel. Otherwise you will have current in the ground wire which is bad. Just hook the 4 wires up properly and you'll be good.
 

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Sorry, I was assuming you are using the evse that came with the car. If you're using a 240v Clipper Creek that only has 2 hots and a ground, you can use the neutral as a ground. Regardless, there has to be a ground.
 
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