DIY Electric Car Forums banner
1 - 1 of 1 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I want to convert my RX8 (or potentially sell it and convert a Miata NC) into a time trial electric racing car. I would normally want to convert it to a different gasoline engine but thought this would be more interesting.
  • Your skill level with auto mechanics and fabrication
Willing to learn, but can't do much at present other than simple stereo wiring jobs and changing my oil. I do know a little Solidworks and am planning to learn CANBUS.
  • The range you are hoping to get (how many miles/charge)
60-80 miles of city driving is fine. What is more important to me is range on heavy load - preferably 15-20 miles at least at constant full continuous load (5-10 laps on most racetracks), as well as the power output of the batteries.
  • What level of performance you are hoping to get
I'm targeting 200 kW of continuous power at the motor, hopefully more if available. I would love to have 400 kW peak (60s load) but it's not as important as the continuous rating. I will be willing to install a huge radiator to keep the motor cool.
  • How much money you are willing to put into your project
Not sure exactly how much but at least $20k, with the potential to spend closer to $30-40k.
  • What parts you've already considered, if any.
One motor I thought might work is the Remy HVH250-115 DOM with a Rhinehart PM250DZR (race version of the PM250DZ), running the combo at up to 700V (or 800V if possible) and 700A peak and 700V 300A continuous. The Tesla motors are another option but I don't like those because of their low continuous rating and their inability to be adapted to a gearbox. Also, Li-NMC cells look interesting because their 3.7V voltage means less cells for the same system voltage (which is high at 700-800V).
  • Other things
I want to retain the stock manual transmission (or swap it for something that can handle the torque), as this gives me more options for gear ratios and is more fun to drive. Also, because this is a track car, weight is important - I'm hoping to keep the battery under 500 lbs, but this may not be possible even with the best cells available (two Chevy volt packs in series could do the trick but would also weigh 860lb for the two). Finally, the less fabrication has to be done, the better, especially anything having to do with cutting the car frame. I may end up outsourcing some or all of the mechanics work. I'm also not opposed to spreading out the project over a few years to lessen budget requirements.
 
1 - 1 of 1 Posts
Top