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Ok so a DC-DC conerter is unreliable? I mean why would I need a 12v battery? anyways if its recommended I will buy one
It's as usual, you get what you pay for. :D

A well built DC/DC will of course be extremely reliable, but even a high quality product might fail and when the DC/DC fails your whole car will go black in an instant. If you're driving when it's dark a total blackout will of course be extremely dangerous since you'll lose your head lights.

A DC/DC will also shut down or current limit the output if you temporarely overload it. For example, if you get a short circuit somewhere the DC/DC might cause a black or brown out until the fuse blows or, if you're unlucky, the DC/DC will limit itself to protect the fuse and you'll manually have to figure out where the short is and pull the fuse. Not so good.

A small battery is a good safe guard for many of these problems. A battery doesn't back off like a DC/DC if there's a short circuit but will provide current enough to blow the fuse. Also; a battery will take care of peak currents so you can choose a DC/DC that covers the need for, for example, 90% of the time but that will need a little help from the battery for the initial current rush when you switch something on, like the high beam.

Some people only use a 12 Volt battery instead of a DC/DC, but that has it's own draw backs like that you need a separate charger for it plus that it means your 12 Volt system will be running at ~11.5 Volt rather than ~13.5 Volt (which is the normal charging current for the 12 Volt battery in a car). This will make your lamps yellowish and weak and also mean that the margins for the Soliton 1 will be very narrow (it starts to warn for low voltage at 11 Volt and shuts down at 10 Volt).

In Europe there's also a legal demand that a broken down car must have a battery big enough to provide power to the hazard flashers for at least 24 hours. I don't know if there's similar rules in US as well but it's worth checking out before you start your conversion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Nice, in my province and in canada they are lost!
I called the federal government and they have nothing about electric cars

I called the provincial government and they have no clue

I called the SAAQ(Insurance society of quebec) they keep transfering me..

I called my city and they said buy an hybrid instead... lol

Im having e-mail conversations with people in my province and they all told me to convert and to insure it as an ICE car and not to mention my electric conversion
 

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Nice, in my province and in canada they are lost!
I called the federal government and they have nothing about electric cars

I called the provincial government and they have no clue

I called the SAAQ(Insurance society of quebec) they keep transfering me..

I called my city and they said buy an hybrid instead... lol

Im having e-mail conversations with people in my province and they all told me to convert and to insure it as an ICE car and not to mention my electric conversion
Isn't life fun!:rolleyes:
:D

Be careful about that last option. Over here in the UK if you insure a car and fail to describe anything and everything that might make it different to standard then the insurer will take your money but you won't have any viable cover in the event of a claim and then will be found to be driving without insurance.
 

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I mean why would I need a 12v battery? anyways if its recommended I will buy one
Your car already has one, as long as it's still working just use the stock 12v battery. No need to replace it unless it's dead, it's too heavy or you need the room for EV parts. You don't need to really touch ANY of the 12v system, you simply need to find a new way to charge the stock battery (that's what the dc/dc converter will do).
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Isn't life fun!:rolleyes:
:D

Be careful about that last option. Over here in the UK if you insure a car and fail to describe anything and everything that might make it different to standard then the insurer will take your money but you won't have any viable cover in the event of a claim and then will be found to be driving without insurance.
Yeah, well good news! I just spoke to the SAAQ, a guy with tons of EV knowledge! I was impressed. Anyways, this guy told me the province doesn't have a formal way to describe how to make ev conversions. He told me to summit a booklet or plans with a lot of description on how the car will be weight distribution, power used, and up to the wiring capacities and OHMs Im just not sure what Ohms are... He told me I have to summit the project before creating it. Once that is done they will call me and tell me if it is approved or not. If it is not approved they will tell me why and what to do to get it approved. Hope it works :D
 

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Good luck for the imatriculation of your vehicule with the SAAQ!!..

I build some EV parts for this guy http://www.voitureselectriques.ca/fr/voitures/voitures.shtml , and this one is incapable to register his vehicules. The SAAQ cause it a lot of problem. He lost lot of money to try to be legal.
 

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In a way I'm glad Alberta (oil country) seems oblivious to electric cars, everyone I've asked seems to say that as long as the car passes a normal safety you can register it. These items mainly include horn/wipers/lights/brakes/e-brake/tires/steering/ball joints/bearings with little mention of the propulsion system. Since my Porsche is already registered as a gas vehicle I will simply go in and request to have the "fuel" changed from gas to electric. I expect blank stares and people who don't know where the form is to change fuel type, and if there is an option for "electric". I haven't gotten a firm answer from the insurance company about coverage, there's no problem in basic coverage and they were very friendly and willing to help, however I might need an appraisal to have the vehicle covered for its EV value instead of gas "book" value.

However on the other side, there is no tax break, rebate, incentive or anything related to the use of an electric car in this province. When I contacted my local branch of government they basically laughed at me when I suggested the implementation of some sort of electric car incentive if one wasn't already in place. They said maybe we’ll look into it when you can actually buy an electric car *insert sarcastic laugh here* (this was a couple of months ago). But to be clear this Province is only “rich” because of oil, and I’m sure they don’t want to give that up anytime soon, they depend on oil revenue as their cash cow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Yabert, yes I called this guy because he now builds electric car as a living. he's the one that told me how hard it is to get the car approved by the SAAQ but when I called the SAAQ I spoke to Marc Barré, Engineer for modified cars, he said it MUST be a 1997 or older! while the guy you helped is still trying to get the newer mazda 3 approved.

He said it wont be hard to get it approved if I summit a detailed doccument of my project with safety features
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
rwaudio, I know what you mean by government, federal or provincial. Here, in quebec, we make most of our money because of Hydroquebec making tons of electricity by using green renewable energy. But we do not have anything to help run or build electric cars

I called several times at the government phone likes and all of the reacted like you said. Oh electric car *insert laugh here* umm no we have nothing for that...

that is why I was suprised to find someone at the SAAQ that had a good knowledge on electric cars!

I wish we had the new governmental subventions, 10,000$ if it is completely electric!
 
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