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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
Any information going around on the Tesla's air conditioner compressor?

I am looking for the a/c system options for my conversion.
I settled on driving a typical Sanden R134 compressor from the tailshaft of the motor.
Yet maybe the Tesla compressor is good?
Any idea what voltage it takes in? How many amps could it draw?

Any positive/negatives you see on this plan?
I once checked about the Nissan Leaf setup, and I believe it's more complicated than typical auto a/c systems.
I think the Leaf has two expansion valves and a "special" evaporator with two different loops inside?
I have no idea if this is correct, please do correct if I'm wrong!

Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I just saw the:
Benling 27cc a/c scroll compressor (from evtv.me)

It states it's 15,700 Btu...
Anybody got an idea how many BTUs are "typical" 2017 vehicles?
Something like a Toyota Corolla, not a Cadillac Escalade.
Any thoughts on the BTU number of those systems?
 

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I've been looking into this recently too.

I dont believe the Tesla system has been hacked yet. I dont know about other cars. I read a post here, maybe Dr Jeff with the delorian that he plugged it in but it required CAN communication or something else fancy to work.

I had three options
Masterflux
EVTV scroll compressor
one more i cant remember but it was the most expensive.

All i think were capable of 15000BTU's, and i havent seen much higher than that. Since i'm converting a sedan i want that. I also want 400v so i can plug it straight to my battery and have a smaller DC-DC converter. The complete masterflux system with controller is about $1500ish.
I've decided to try the EVTV compressor, its the cheapest, one of the most powerful and runs straight from battery.

I wish i could provide you links for the products and better descriptions but i'm on a different computer and having made a decision, i've quickly forgotten all the details why :eek:

PS dont forget to size your evaporator and condensor appropriately, all that power wont go anywhere otherwise.
 

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Has anybody found any technical data about this compressor lately ?
The last post on this thread was a few years ago.
I am interested in hacking this compressor for EV conversion projects. I live in Florida and it gets excruciatingly hot and AC is a must have option. I plan to use this compressor on a 1999 Corvette for now until I get my act together on a full blown EV conversion.
I have a compressor on my bench now that I am dissecting. It looks like it uses two phase electrical as an input. They are heavy gauge wires that can handle about 100 amps or so.
I need to know what that source is for sure. How many volts ?
AC or DC ?
The motor uses three phase input and is attached to a board that looks like a speed control. There is a plug off to the side that has four 18 gauge wires. I am thinking it is the motor control. How does the motor control work ? I will post some pictures of the board when I take it off. It has to be de-soldered first. I don't want to damage it unless I have to.
 

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Not sure what model you have, but the easiest to hack will be the pre 2014 Denso ES34C which is PWM controlled. Later compressors are CANbus controlled and will require access to a functional vehicle. I have an ES34C and will also be looking at it shortly. I've attached a snip from the Tesla wiring diagram.
 

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Success! I got the ES34C running. It is very easy to control and very tolerant of input conditions. It takes a PWM signal anywhere from 35 to 400 hz. Control range is from 5% (max speed) to 85% (min speed) duty cycle.

I supplied 12V to Pin 7 (VIgn), Grounded pins 1 (Gnd) and 6 (On/Off), and left pins 3 (Diag) and 5 (Power (FB)) unconnected. The 12V PWM signal was input to pin 6 (PWMin).

Note that the colors on the wires coming out of the compressor body do not agree with the Tesla wiring diagram I attached in the previous post (colors may change at the mating connector).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
jsimonkeller,
Maybe in a site like RockAuto.com?
You could check 2015 model year, then compare with 16, 17, and 18.
Maybe those part numbers change?


Keep us posted!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
From my uninformed opinion: I doubt the compressor runs its main motor on 12volts.
I would imagine it wants high voltage, a la battery-packs.
What that high voltage is? That's the question. (300 volts? I don't know!)

Maybe tiger can answer us.


I wouldn't see a problem testing the compressor without the full refrigerant loop... yet just for short testing cycles. Remember the refrigerant loop also contains diffused compressor oil... which an open-loop wont be providing.


Yet I wouldn't mind testing it in a couple of short bursts.


As for the PWM controller, I don't know what tiger did, yet if I had to do it right now, I would grab a raspberry pi (or an Arduino) and go to town.


Let us know what you plan on doing next!!
 

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As far as a I know, all Denso ES34C compressors are PWM controlled. Don't look at the date ranges on the Ebay listings. Try to find units for sale that show a picture with the same label that I posted.

You need a HV source connected to test the compressor for it to operate. 12V is only for control. As far as a PWM controller, search for "PWM Generator" on Ebay. There are a number of low cost boards available for less than $10.
 

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You need a HV DC source to test with. Not sure what the minimum requirement is, but I tested with 360V. If I remember correctly, the load with the compressor at max speed (but unloaded), was in the around 10 amps - so 3.3kW.
 

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Success! I got the ES34C running. It is very easy to control and very tolerant of input conditions. It takes a PWM signal anywhere from 35 to 400 hz. Control range is from 5% (max speed) to 85% (min speed) duty cycle.

I supplied 12V to Pin 7 (VIgn), Grounded pins 1 (Gnd) and 6 (On/Off), and left pins 3 (Diag) and 5 (Power (FB)) unconnected. The 12V PWM signal was input to pin 6 (PWMin).

Note that the colors on the wires coming out of the compressor body do not agree with the Tesla wiring diagram I attached in the previous post (colors may change at the mating connector).
I see you have pin 6 grounded and PWM? In the telsa diagram On/Off was pin 2, but you said that was 6... is this a typo?

Thanks...
 

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Yes, typo! Pins 1 (Gnd) and 2(On/Off) were grounded.
Thanks for the confirmation on that. I'm planning to hook up my compressor as follows:

Pin 1: Ground
Pin 2: To be grounded by the AC thermostat
Pin 6: Hooked to PWM board (in pics)
Pin 7: +12 V

Should this work for controlling it?

I'm thinking about running it at 50% PWM since my system is likely much smaller than a model S.

Thanks,
 

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This is connected to the HV battery (360V) via a contactor. PWM control input is 12VDC. Current draw at maximum load is in the neighbourhood of 12 amps @ 360V, so somewhere around 4.5kW draw.
 

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This is connected to the HV battery (360V) via a contactor. PWM control input is 12VDC. Current draw at maximum load is in the neighbourhood of 12 amps @ 360V, so somewhere around 4.5kW draw.
Is it AC or DC?
I was planning to place a second electric compressor in parallel with mechanical on a semi-truck and add a fan, place Harbour freight gasoline generator in the back of cabin and add charger to truck batteries, this way I was going to use stock Air conditioner system without much additional devices.
If you say it is DC, do you think simple transformer from AC 110V to AC 300V through DIODE and Capacitors will work?
Thank you for attention!
 
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